Anarchism II

What is Anarchism?

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712373

Category: Fiction

Page: 801

View: 5560

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Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism I What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti- foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]

Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism IV

Modern civilisation faces three potentially catastrophic crises:

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712357

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 994

View: 834

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Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism IV What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti- foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]

Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism V

Anarchism is a socio-economic and political theory, but not an ideology

Author: Heinz Duthel

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742712349

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 964

View: 8440

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Discover Entdecke Decouvrir Anarchism I What is Anarchism? Anarchism is a political theory, which is skeptical of the justification of authority and power, especially political power. Anarchism is usually grounded in moral claims about the importance of individual liberty. Anarchists also offer a positive theory of human flourishing, based upon an ideal of non-coercive consensus building. Anarchism has inspired practical efforts at establishing utopian communities, radical and revolutionary political agendas, and various forms of direct action. This entry primarily describes “philosophical anarchism”: it focuses on anarchism as a theoretical idea and not as a form of political activism. While philosophical anarchism describes a skeptical theory of political legitimation, anarchism is also a concept that has been employed in philosophical and literary theory to describe a sort of anti- foundationalism. Philosophical anarchism can mean either a theory of political life that is skeptical of attempts to justify state authority or a philosophical theory that is skeptical of the attempt to assert firm foundations for knowledge. Anarchism in political philosophy maintains that there is no legitimate political or governmental authority. In political philosophy anarchy is an important topic for consideration—even for those who are not anarchists—as the a-political background condition against which various forms of political organization are arrayed, compared, and justified. Anarchy is often viewed by non-anarchists as the unhappy or unstable condition in which there is no legitimate authority. Anarchism as a philosophical idea is not necessarily connected to practical activism. There are political anarchists who take action in order to destroy what they see as illegitimate states. The popular imagination often views anarchists as bomb-throwing nihilists. But philosophical anarchism is a theoretical standpoint. In order to decide who (and whether) one should act upon anarchist insight, we require a further theory of political action, obligation, and obedience grounded in further ethical reflection. Simmons explains that philosophical anarchists “do not take the illegitimacy of states to entail a strong moral imperative to oppose or eliminate states” (Simmons 2001: 104). Some anarchists remain obedient to ruling authorities; others revolt or resist in various ways. The question of action depends upon a theory of what sort of political obligation follows from our philosophical, moral, political, religious, and aesthetic commitments. Bibliography Bakunin, Mikhail, 1873 [1990], Statism and Anarchy (Gosudarstvennost’ i anarkhii?a), Marshall S. Shatz (trans.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. –––, 1882/1908 [1910/1970], God and the State (Dieu et l’État), New York: Dover Publishing. Ben-Dor, Oren, 2000, Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham’s Constitutionalism, Oxford: Hart Publishing. Bentham, Jeremy, 1843, “Anarchical Fallacies”, in The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2. Edinburgh: Tait. [Bentham 1843 available online]

Bakunin: Statism and Anarchy

Author: Michael Bakunin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139935801

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 6270

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Statism and Anarchy is a complete English translation of the last work by the great Russian anarchist Michael Bakunin, written in 1873. Then he assails the Marxist alternative, predicting that a 'dictatorship of the proletariat' will in fact be a dictatorship over the proletariat, and will produce a new class of socialist rulers. Instead, he outlines his vision of an anarchist society and identifies the social forces he believes will achieve an anarchist revolution. Statism and Anarchy had an immediate influence on the 'to the people' movement of Russian populism, and Bakunin's ideas inspired significant anarchist movements in Spain, Italy, Russia and elsewhere. In a lucid introduction Marshall Shatz locates Bakunin in his immediate historical and intellectual context, and assesses the impact of his ideas on the wider development of European radical thought. A guide to further reading and chronology of events are also appended as aids to students encountering Bakunin's thought for the first time.

The Bloomsbury Companion to Anarchism

Author: Ruth Kinna

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1441142703

Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 388

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The Continuum Companion to Anarchism is a comprehensive reference work to support research in anarchism. The book considers the different approaches to anarchism as an ideology and explains the development of anarchist studies from the early twentieth century to the present day. It is unique in that it highlights the relationship between theory and practice, pays special attention to methodology, presents non-English works, key terms and concepts, and discusses new directions for the field. Focusing on the contemporary movement, the work outlines significant shifts in the study of anarchist ideas and explores recent debates. The Companion will appeal to scholars in this growing field, whether they are interested in the general study of anarchism or in more specific areas. Featuring the work of key scholars, The Continuum Companion to Anarchism will be an essential tool for both the scholar and the activist.

Anarchism, science, and sex

eugenics in eastern Spain, 1900-1937

Author: Richard Cleminson

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 287

View: 3491

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This study examines the reception of the controversial science of eugenics in Catalan and Valencian anarchist reviews in the early twentieth century, setting anarchist discourse on sexuality, theories of degeneration, inheritance and disease in the contex

Making Sense of Anarchism

Errico Malatesta’s Experiments with Revolution, 1889-1900

Author: Davide Turcato

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113727140X

Category: History

Page: 275

View: 9494

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Can we make sense of anarchism or is that an oxymoron? Guided by the principle that someone else's rationality is not an empirical finding but a methodological presumption, this book addresses that question as it investigates the ideas and action of one of the most prominent and underrated anarchists of all times: the Italian, Errico Malatesta.

The American Historical Association's guide to historical literature

Author: Mary Beth Norton

Publisher: Oxford Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 2027

View: 8325

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This entirely new edition of a keystone reference is the place to start researching any topic in any field of history. Hundreds of historians from around the world have selected and provided commentary on the best and most useful works in their fields--almost 27,000 annotated citations--to provide unprecedented bibliographic guidance of extraordinary breadth, from prehistory to the twentieth century. Presented in an accessible format, this completely new work has been ten years in planning and execution. It is divided into sections arranged by chronology and national and regional history, with each section introduced by a brief historiographical essay. And it also contains expanded coverage of Africa, Asia, and North and South America. Each bibliographic citation is identified by a unique reference number and includes all essential data, along with a brief critical annotation written by a specialist in the field. Also included are guides to the contributors of annotations and complete author and subject indexes. An indispensable work for scholars, students, librarians, and general readers, the AHA Guide to Historical Literature is essential for anyone who is serious about history.

Medicine, madness, and social history

essays in honour of Roy Porter

Author: Roberta E. Bivins,John V. Pickstone

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: 9780230525498

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 396

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Honoring and extending the work of historian Roy Porter, this volume offers lively, accessible and often topical chapters presenting orginal research on the social history of medicine, madness and the Enlightenment.

Spain at war

the Spanish Civil War in context, 1931-1939

Author: George Richard Esenwein,Adrian Shubert

Publisher: Longman Pub Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 7250

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The Spanish Civil War (July 1936-April 1939) killed several hundred thousand soldiers and civilians and created psychological scars that would take over half a century to heal. Here, two of the ablest young historians of modern Spain examine the ill-fated Second Republic (1931-1936) and its tragic aftermath in their full historical background. Alongside the military and political dimensions, the book breaks new ground in exploring such themes as the impact of the war on gender relations; the varieties of terrorism; and the role of propaganda.

Anarchism

A Documentary History of Libertarian Ideas, Volume Two: The Anarchist Current (1939-2007)

Author: Robert Graham

Publisher: Black Rose Books Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 8953

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Explores an elaborate genealogy of anti-authoritarian thought.