Anarchist Portraits

Author: Paul Avrich

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691006093

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 3853

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From the celebrated Russian intellectuals Michael Bakunin and Peter Kropotkin to the little-known Australian bootmaker and radical speaker J. W. Fleming, this book probes the lives and personalities of representative anarchists. "It is . . . in Mr. Avrich's composite picture of anarchism in America that the contradictions, the strength and weaknesses of anarchism as an ideology, as well as the extraordinary dedication and strength of character of its exponents, can be seen most clearly". --James Joll, New York Times Book Review "Believers in anarchism, along with those willing to probe beyond the rote dismissals of the creed as a violent tumult, have a rare intellectual feast in Avrich's work". --Colman McCarthy, Washington Post Book World "So powerfully does [Avrich] make his case that sometimes in Anarchist Portraits the impossible dream seems not quite so impossible". --Gary Kern, Washington Times "Avrich is the foremost American scholar of anarchism in this generation". Robert Zaller, Philadelphia Inquirer

The Dynamite Club

How a Bombing in Fin-de-Siècle Paris Ignited the Age of Modern Terror

Author: John M. Merriman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300217935

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1526

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Distinguished historian John Merriman maintains that the Age of Modern Terror began in Paris on February 12, 1894, when anarchist Emile Henry set off a bomb in the Café Terminus, killing one and wounding twenty French citizens. The true story of the circumstances that led a young radical to commit a cold-blooded act of violence against innocent civilians makes for riveting reading, shedding new light on the terrorist mindset and on the subsequent worldwide rise of anarchism by deed. Merriman’s fascinating study of modern history’s first terrorists, emboldened by the invention of dynamite, reveals much about the terror of today.

Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present

Author: Max Boot

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0871403501

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 2746

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“Destined to be the classic account of what may be the oldest . . . hardest form of war.”—John Nagl, Wall Street Journal Invisible Armies presents an entirely original narrative of warfare, which demonstrates that, far from the exception, loosely organized partisan or guerrilla warfare has been the dominant form of military conflict throughout history. New York Times best-selling author and military historian Max Boot traces guerrilla warfare and terrorism from antiquity to the present, narrating nearly thirty centuries of unconventional military conflicts. Filled with dramatic analysis of strategy and tactics, as well as many memorable characters—from Italian nationalist Guiseppe Garibaldi to the “Quiet American,” Edward Lansdale—Invisible Armies is “as readable as a novel” (Michael Korda, Daily Beast) and “a timely reminder to politicians and generals of the hard-earned lessons of history” (Economist).

Rochdale Village

Robert Moses, 6,000 Families, and New York City's Great Experiment in Integrated Housing

Author: Peter Eisenstadt

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801459689

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 880

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From 1963 to 1965 roughly 6,000 families moved into Rochdale Village, at the time the world's largest housing cooperative, in southeastern Queens, New York. The moderate-income cooperative attracted families from a diverse background, white and black, to what was a predominantly black neighborhood. In its early years, Rochdale was widely hailed as one of the few successful large-scale efforts to create an integrated community in New York City or, for that matter, anywhere in the United States. Rochdale was built by the United Housing Foundation. Its president, Abraham Kazan, had been the major builder of low-cost cooperative housing in New York City for decades. His partner in many of these ventures was Robert Moses. Their work together was a marriage of opposites: Kazan's utopian-anarchist strain of social idealism with its roots in the early twentieth century Jewish labor movement combined with Moses's hardheaded, no-nonsense pragmatism. Peter Eisenstadt recounts the history of Rochdale Village's first years, from the controversies over its planning, to the civil rights demonstrations at its construction site in 1963, through the late 1970s, tracing the rise and fall of integration in the cooperative. (Today, although Rochdale is no longer integrated, it remains a successful and vibrant cooperative that is a testament to the ideals of its founders and the hard work of its residents.) Rochdale's problems were a microcosm of those of the city as a whole-troubled schools, rising levels of crime, fallout from the disastrous teachers' strike of 1968, and generally heightened racial tensions. By the end of the 1970s few white families remained. Drawing on exhaustive archival research, extensive interviews with the planners and residents, and his own childhood experiences growing up in Rochdale Village, Eisenstadt offers an insightful and engaging look at what it was like to live in Rochdale and explores the community's place in the postwar history of America's cities and in the still unfinished quests for racial equality and affordable urban housing.

Bakunin: Statism and Anarchy

Author: Michael Bakunin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139935801

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

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Statism and Anarchy is a complete English translation of the last work by the great Russian anarchist Michael Bakunin, written in 1873. Then he assails the Marxist alternative, predicting that a 'dictatorship of the proletariat' will in fact be a dictatorship over the proletariat, and will produce a new class of socialist rulers. Instead, he outlines his vision of an anarchist society and identifies the social forces he believes will achieve an anarchist revolution. Statism and Anarchy had an immediate influence on the 'to the people' movement of Russian populism, and Bakunin's ideas inspired significant anarchist movements in Spain, Italy, Russia and elsewhere. In a lucid introduction Marshall Shatz locates Bakunin in his immediate historical and intellectual context, and assesses the impact of his ideas on the wider development of European radical thought. A guide to further reading and chronology of events are also appended as aids to students encountering Bakunin's thought for the first time.

Making Sense of Anarchism

Errico Malatesta’s Experiments with Revolution, 1889-1900

Author: Davide Turcato

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113727140X

Category: History

Page: 275

View: 5155

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Can we make sense of anarchism or is that an oxymoron? Guided by the principle that someone else's rationality is not an empirical finding but a methodological presumption, this book addresses that question as it investigates the ideas and action of one of the most prominent and underrated anarchists of all times: the Italian, Errico Malatesta.

The Proud Tower

A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914;Barbara W. Tuchman's Great War Series

Author: Barbara W. Tuchman

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0307798119

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 7132

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The Proud Tower, the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Guns of August, and The Zimmerman Telegram comprise Barbara W. Tuchman’s classic histories of the First World War era During the fateful quarter century leading up to World War I, the climax of a century of rapid, unprecedented change, a privileged few enjoyed Olympian luxury as the underclass was “heaving in its pain, its power, and its hate.” In The Proud Tower, Barbara W. Tuchman brings the era to vivid life: the decline of the Edwardian aristocracy; the Anarchists of Europe and America; Germany and its self-depicted hero, Richard Strauss; Diaghilev’s Russian ballet and Stravinsky’s music; the Dreyfus Affair; the Peace Conferences in The Hague; and the enthusiasm and tragedy of Socialism, epitomized by the assassination of Jean Jaurès on the night the Great War began and an epoch came to a close. Praise for The Proud Tower “[Barbara W. Tuchman’s] Pulitzer Prize–winning The Guns of August was an expert evocation of the first spasm of the 1914–1918 war. She brings the same narrative gifts and panoramic camera eye to her portrait of the antebellum world.”—Newsweek “A rare combination of impeccable scholarship and literary polish . . . It would be impossible to read The Proud Tower without pleasure and admiration.”—The New York Times “An exquisitely written and thoroughly engrossing work . . . The author’s knowledge and skill are so impressive that they whet the appetite for more.”—Chicago Tribune “[Tuchman] tells her story with cool wit and warm understanding.”—Time From the Trade Paperback edition.

Sacco and Vanzetti

The Anarchist Background

Author: Paul Avrich

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691026046

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 8616

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An in-depth study of the lives of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, based on anarchist sources and new materials, provides answers to crucial questions about one of the most notorious cases in American legal history. Bibliog.

Anarchist Voices

An Oral History of Anarchism in America

Author: Paul Avrich

Publisher: AK Press

ISBN: 9781904859277

Category: Political Science

Page: 574

View: 6666

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In Anarchist Voices, Avrich lets anarchists speak for themselves.

American Anarchism

The Politics of Gender, Culture, and Community from Haymarket to the First World War

Author: Brigitte Anne Koenig

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 1018

View: 7751

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Stalin

Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

Author: Stephen Kotkin

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698170105

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 976

View: 7559

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A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler’s son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivization of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts. Where did such power come from? In Stalin, Stephen Kotkin offers a biography that, at long last, is equal to this shrewd, sociopathic, charismatic dictator in all his dimensions. The character of Stalin emerges as both astute and blinkered, cynical and true believing, people oriented and vicious, canny enough to see through people but prone to nonsensical beliefs. We see a man inclined to despotism who could be utterly charming, a pragmatic ideologue, a leader who obsessed over slights yet was a precocious geostrategic thinker—unique among Bolsheviks—and yet who made egregious strategic blunders. Through it all, we see Stalin’s unflinching persistence, his sheer force of will—perhaps the ultimate key to understanding his indelible mark on history. Stalin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime’s inner geography of power, bringing to the fore fresh materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin’s psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin’s near paranoia was fundamentally political, and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution’s structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin demonstrates the impossibility of understanding Stalin’s momentous decisions outside of the context of the tragic history of imperial Russia. The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement, a work that recasts the way we think about the Soviet Union, revolution, dictatorship, the twentieth century, and indeed the art of history itself. Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 will be published by Penguin Press in October 2017

Designs for Anarchist Postage Stamps

With Sixteen Portraits

Author: Clifford Harper

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780946061143

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 53

View: 7500

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16 portraits of anarchist luminaries - Godwin, Stirner, Proudhon, Goldman, Berkman, Herbert Read, Durruti, Bakunin, Louise Michel, Zapata etc - together with an essay by Colin Ward on anarchism and stamps, and an afterword by Clifford Harper on his own personal connections to the postal service. Another beautifully crafted vehicle for the incredible artwork of Cliff Harper.

Black Flame

The Revolutionary Class Politics of Anarchism and Syndicalism

Author: Lucien Van der Walt,Michael Schmidt

Publisher: A K PressDistribution

ISBN: 9781904859161

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 1160

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Part one of a two-part history of the non-Marxist, libertarian form of socialism, aka anarchism. From its origins in the 18th century and the conflicts with Marx in the First International to insurrections, trade unions and specific anarchist organisations, the hidden history of an alternative tradition is revealed. The ideas about socialism so prevalent today, that it equates with state ownership, that is the perogative of the Party, that it has somehow failed, are all dismantled in this scholarly engagement with a complex ideology.

Asyl und Aufenthalt

die Schweiz als Zuflucht und Wirkungsstätte von Slaven im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert

Author: Monika Bankowski

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Asylum, Right of

Page: 484

View: 2683

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Living Without Domination

The Possibility of an Anarchist Utopia

Author: Samuel Clark

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409485196

Category: Philosophy

Page: 182

View: 2868

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Living Without Domination defends the bold claim that humans can organise themselves to live peacefully and prosperously together in an anarchist utopia. Clark refutes errors about what anarchism is, about utopianism, and about human sociability and its history. He then develops an analysis of natural human social activity which places anarchy in the real landscape of sociability, along with more familiar possibilities including states and slavery. The book is distinctive in bringing the rigour of analytic political philosophy to anarchism, which is all too often dismissed out of hand or skated over in popular history.

The War on Terrorism and the Terror of God

Author: Lee Griffith

Publisher: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 399

View: 2419

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Uniquely relevant in a world shaken by recent acts of terror, this title calls people of faith to the way of peace, the Christian response to evil and violence.

Anarchy & Culture

The Aesthetic Politics of Modernism

Author: David Weir

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781558490833

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 303

View: 3199

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Anarchism is generally understood as a failed ideology, a political philosophy that once may have had many followers but today attracts only cranks and eccentrics. This book argues that the decline of political anarchism is only half the story; the other half is a tale of widespread cultural success. David Weir develops this thesis in several ways. He begins by considering the place of culture in the political thought of the classical anarchist thinkers William Godwin, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Mikhail Bakunin, and Peter Kropotkin. He then shows how the perceived "anarchy" of nineteenth-century society induced writers such as Matthew Arnold, Henry James, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky to turn away from politics and seek unity in the idea of a common culture. Yet as other late nineteenth-century writers and artists began to sympathize with anarchism, the prospect of a common culture became increasingly remote. In Weir's view, the affinity for anarchism that developed among members of the artistic avant-garde lies behind much of fin de siecle culture. Indeed, the emergence of modernism itself can be understood as the aesthetic realization of anarchist politics. In support of this contention, Weir shows that anarchism is the key aesthetic principle informing the work of a broad range of modernist figures, from Henrik Ibsen and James Joyce to dadaist Hugo Ball and surrealist Luis Bunuel. Weir concludes by reevaluating the phenomenon of postmodernism as only the most recent case of the migration of politics into aesthetics, and by suggesting that anarchism is still very much with us as a cultural condition.