Apollo in the Age of Aquarius

Author: Neil M. Maher

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674977823

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 8968

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In summer 1969, astronauts landed on the moon and hippie hordes descended on Woodstock—two era-defining events that are not entirely coincidental. Neil M. Maher shows how NASA’s celestial aspirations were tethered to terrestrial concerns of the time: the civil rights struggle, the antiwar movement, environmentalism, feminism, and the culture wars.

Apollo in the Age of Aquarius

Author: Neil M. Maher

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067497199X

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2665

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In summer 1969, astronauts landed on the moon and hippie hordes descended on Woodstock—two era-defining events that are not entirely coincidental. Neil M. Maher shows how NASA’s celestial aspirations were tethered to terrestrial concerns of the time: the civil rights struggle, the antiwar movement, environmentalism, feminism, and the culture wars.

Inventing the American Astronaut

Author: Matthew H. Hersch

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137025298

Category: Science

Page: 219

View: 3413

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Who were the men who led America's first expeditions into space? Soldiers? Daredevils? The public sometimes imagined them that way: heroic military men and hot-shot pilots without the capacity for doubt, fear, or worry. However, early astronauts were hard-working and determined professionals - 'organization men' - who were calm, calculating, and highly attuned to the politics and celebrity of the Space Race. Many would have been at home in corporate America - and until the first rockets carried humans into space, some seemed to be headed there. Instead, they strapped themselves to missiles and blasted skyward, returning with a smile and an inspiring word for the press. From the early days of Project Mercury to the last moon landing, this lively history demystifies the American astronaut while revealing the warring personalities, raw ambition, and complex motives of the men who were the public face of the space program.

Arc of Justice

A Saga of Race, Civil Rights, and Murder in the Jazz Age

Author: Kevin Boyle

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429900164

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 620

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An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

No Requiem for the Space Age

The Apollo Moon Landings and American Culture

Author: Matthew D. Tribbe

Publisher: OUP Us

ISBN: 0199313520

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 7821

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'No Requiem for the Space Age' paints a portrait of a nation in the midst of questioning the very values that had guided it through the post-war years as it began to develop new conceptions of progress that had little to do with blasting ever more men to the moon. Here is a narrative of the 1960s and 1970s unlike any told before, with the story of Apollo as the story of America itself in a time of dramatic cultural change.

Of a Fire on the Moon

Author: Norman Mailer

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0553390627

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 1935

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For many, the moon landing was the defining event of the twentieth century. So it seems only fitting that Norman Mailer—the literary provocateur who altered the landscape of American nonfiction—wrote the most wide-ranging, far-seeing chronicle of the Apollo 11 mission. A classic chronicle of America’s reach for greatness in the midst of the Cold War, Of a Fire on the Moon compiles the reportage Mailer published between 1969 and 1970 in Life magazine: gripping firsthand dispatches from inside NASA’s clandestine operations in Houston and Cape Kennedy; technical insights into the magnitude of their awe-inspiring feat; and prescient meditations that place the event in human context as only Mailer could. Praise for Of a Fire on the Moon “The gift of a genius . . . a twentieth-century American epic—a Moby Dick of space.”—New York “Mailer’s account of Apollo 11 stands as a stunning image of human energy and purposefulness. . . . It is an act of revelation—the only verbal deed to be worthy of the dream and the reality it celebrates.”—Saturday Review “A wild and dazzling book.”—The New York Times Book Review “Still the most challenging and stimulating account of [the] mission to appear in print.”—The Washington Post Praise for Norman Mailer “[Norman Mailer] loomed over American letters longer and larger than any other writer of his generation.”—The New York Times “A writer of the greatest and most reckless talent.”—The New Yorker “Mailer is indispensable, an American treasure.”—The Washington Post “A devastatingly alive and original creative mind.”—Life “Mailer is fierce, courageous, and reckless and nearly everything he writes has sections of headlong brilliance.”—The New York Review of Books “The largest mind and imagination [in modern] American literature . . . Unlike just about every American writer since Henry James, Mailer has managed to grow and become richer in wisdom with each new book.”—Chicago Tribune “Mailer is a master of his craft. His language carries you through the story like a leaf on a stream.”—The Cincinnati Post

The Long Space Age

The Economic Origins of Space Exploration from Colonial America to the Cold War

Author: Alexander MacDonald

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300219326

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 6434

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A NASA insider highlights the current and historic roles of private enterprise in humanity s pursuit of spaceflight"

Sun of Apollo

Author: Darab Lawyer,Clinton Libbey

Publisher: Abny Media Group, LLC

ISBN: 0984716815

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 4855

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December 21st, 2012 - the most anticipated and talked about day in human history. The day when a galactic alignment between the Sun, the Earth and the center of the Milky Way Galaxy will occur, marking the end of a 26,000-year life cycle.In 2012, the cosmic battle of the ages rages on as the world transitions from the Age of Pisces into the new Age of Aquarius - the time, it is thought, when balance between men and women will finally be achieved. When Darius Prince, a 30-year-old highly ambitious Wall Street stockbroker, receives a cryptic message on his trading screen, his life takes an unexpected turn for the worse. As he sorts through the bizarre meanings behind the symbolic message, he discovers a trail of clues that lead him to believe he has a higher purpose - and that somebody is out to destroy him. When a comet aligns with Stonehenge, he begins having apocalyptic visions of the future and is confined to a mental institution. Labeled paranoid and bipolar by his doctor, he escapes when an attack is made on his life and embarks on a series of quests to find his soulmate and fulfill his destiny.The first in a fictional series that intertwines biblical prophecy with the legendary Grail Myth, SUN OF APOLLO ventures deep inside an apocalyptic New World Order in 2012 - the rise of the New Roman Empire.

Stealing God's Thunder

Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod And the Invention of America

Author: Philip Dray

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812968107

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 7789

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A detailed portrait of Benjamin Franklin concentrates on his scientific experiments and discoveries and explores the implications of his empirical research and his revolutionary inventions for the evolution of American democracy.

American Enlightenments

Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason

Author: Caroline Winterer

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300224567

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9865

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A provocative reassessment of the concept of an American golden age of European-born reason and intellectual curiosity in the years following the Revolutionary War The accepted myth of the “American Enlightenment” suggests that the rejection of monarchy and establishment of a new republic in the United States in the eighteenth century was the realization of utopian philosophies born in the intellectual salons of Europe and radiating outward to the New World. In this revelatory work, Stanford historian Caroline Winterer argues that a national mythology of a unitary, patriotic era of enlightenment in America was created during the Cold War to act as a shield against the threat of totalitarianism, and that Americans followed many paths toward political, religious, scientific, and artistic enlightenment in the 1700s that were influenced by European models in more complex ways than commonly thought. Winterer’s book strips away our modern inventions of the American national past, exploring which of our ideas and ideals are truly rooted in the eighteenth century and which are inventions and mystifications of more recent times.

Florida's Space Coast

The Impact of NASA on the Sunshine State

Author: William Barnaby Faherty

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813025636

Category: History

Page: 205

View: 6364

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The author recreates the history of Florida's "Space Coast," revealing how science and government conspired to reshape this piece of the state's Western shoreline permanently. (Science & Mathematics)

We Are As Gods

Back to the Land in the 1970s on the Quest for a New America

Author: Kate Daloz

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610392264

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 5425

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Between 1970 and 1974 ten million Americans abandoned the city, and the commercialism, and all the inauthentic bourgeois comforts of the Eisenhower-era America of their parents. Instead, they went back to the land. It was the only time in modern history that urbanization has gone into reverse. Kate Daloz follows the dreams and ideals of a small group of back-to-the-landers to tell the story of a nationwide movement and moment. And she shows how the faltering, hopeful, but impractical impulses of that first generation sowed the seeds for the organic farming movement and the transformation of American agriculture and food tastes. In the Myrtle Hill commune and neighboring Entropy Acres, high-minded ideas of communal living and shared decision-making crash headlong into the realities of brutal Northern weather and the colossal inconvenience of having no plumbing or electricity. Nature, it turns out, is not always a generous or provident host—frosts are hard, snowfalls smother roads, and small wood fires do not heat imperfectly insulated geodesic domes. Group living turns out to be harder than expected too. Being free to do what you want and set your own rules leads to some unexpected limitations: once the group starts growing a little marijuana they can no longer call on the protection of the law, especially against a rogue member of a nearby community. For some of the group, the lifestyle is truly a saving grace; they credit it with their survival. For others, it is a prison sentence. We Are As Gods (the first line of the Whole Earth Catalog, the movement's bible) is a poignant rediscovery of a seminal moment in American culture, whose influence far outlasted the communities that took to the hills and woods in the late '60s and '70s and remains present in every farmer's market, every store selling Stonyfield products, or Keen shoes, or Patagonia sportswear.

German Rocketeers in the Heart of Dixie

Making Sense of the Nazi Past During the Civil Rights Era

Author: Monique Laney

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300198035

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 1046

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This thought-provoking study by historian Monique Laney focuses on the U.S. government-assisted integration of German rocket specialists and their families into a small southern community at the end of World War II. In 1950, Wernher von Braun and his team of rocket experts relocated to Huntsville, Alabama, a town that would celebrate the team, despite their essential role in the Nazi war effort a decade earlier, for their contributions to the U.S. Army missile program and later to NASA's space program. Based on oral histories, provided by members of the African American and Jewish communities, the rocketeers' families, and co-workers, friends, and neighbors, Laney's book demonstrates how the histories of German Nazism and Jim Crow in the American South intertwine in narratives about the past. This is a critical reassessment of a singular time that links the Cold War, the “Space Race,” and the Civil Rights era while addressing important issues of transnational science and technology, and asking Americans to consider their country's own history of racism when reflecting on the Nazi past.

Subversives

The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power

Author: Seth Rosenfeld

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429969326

Category: History

Page: 752

View: 4849

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Subversives traces the FBI's secret involvement with three iconic figures at Berkeley during the 1960s: the ambitious neophyte politician Ronald Reagan, the fierce but fragile radical Mario Savio, and the liberal university president Clark Kerr. Through these converging narratives, the award-winning investigative reporter Seth Rosenfeld tells a dramatic and disturbing story of FBI surveillance, illegal break-ins, infiltration, planted news stories, poison-pen letters, and secret detention lists. He reveals how the FBI's covert operations—led by Reagan's friend J. Edgar Hoover—helped ignite an era of protest, undermine the Democrats, and benefit Reagan personally and politically. At the same time, he vividly evokes the life of Berkeley in the early sixties—and shows how the university community, a site of the forward-looking idealism of the period, became a battleground in an epic struggle between the government and free citizens. The FBI spent more than $1 million trying to block the release of the secret files on which Subversives is based, but Rosenfeld compelled the bureau to release more than 250,000 pages, providing an extraordinary view of what the government was up to during a turning point in our nation's history. Part history, part biography, and part police procedural, Subversives reads like a true-crime mystery as it provides a fresh look at the legacy of the sixties, sheds new light on one of America's most popular presidents, and tells a cautionary tale about the dangers of secrecy and unchecked power.

Defiant Braceros

How Migrant Workers Fought for Racial, Sexual, and Political Freedom

Author: Mireya Loza

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469629771

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 9217

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In this book, Mireya Loza sheds new light on the private lives of migrant men who participated in the Bracero Program (1942–1964), a binational agreement between the United States and Mexico that allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican workers to enter this country on temporary work permits. While this program and the issue of temporary workers has long been politicized on both sides of the border, Loza argues that the prevailing romanticized image of braceros as a family-oriented, productive, legal workforce has obscured the real, diverse experiences of the workers themselves. Focusing on underexplored aspects of workers' lives--such as their transnational union-organizing efforts, the sexual economies of both hetero and queer workers, and the ethno-racial boundaries among Mexican indigenous braceros--Loza reveals how these men defied perceived political, sexual, and racial norms. Basing her work on an archive of more than 800 oral histories from the United States and Mexico, Loza is the first scholar to carefully differentiate between the experiences of mestizo guest workers and the many Mixtec, Zapotec, Purhepecha, and Mayan laborers. In doing so, she captures the myriad ways these defiant workers responded to the intense discrimination and exploitation of an unjust system that still persists today.

Hasselblad & the Moon Landing

Author: Deborah Ireland

Publisher: Ammonite Press

ISBN: 9781781453346

Category:

Page: 96

View: 4977

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On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people ever to set foot on the Moon, their iconic "small steps" captured forever by the camera the astronauts carried with them: the Hasselblad 500EL. This book looks at the history of the Apollo 11 mission through the lens of the Hasselblad, while narrating the parallel challenge to create a camera that could work on the Moon. It considers the cameras used, and the photographs captured, during the Space Race between Russia and America; looks at the experience of taking photographs on the Moon for the first time; and reflects on the legacy of those images, and their part in the enduring Moon Landing conspiracy theories. The second half of the book presents a commemorative album of photographs taken in space using the Hasselblad 500EL. While the Apollo 11 astronauts left their three cameras behind on the Moon, where they remain to this day, they brought back film magazines containing 1,400 photographs. A selection of the finest of these is shown alongside the mission timeline and transcripts of the conversations between the astronauts and mission control at Houston.

Moondust

In Search of the Men who Fell to Earth

Author: Andrew Smith

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 0747588147

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 5641

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In 1999, Andrew Smith was interviewing Charlie Duke, astronaut and moon walker, for the Sunday Times. During the course of the interview, which took place at Duke's Texan home, the telephone rang and Charlie left the room to answer it. When he returned, some twenty minutes later, he seemed visibly upset. It seemed that he'd just heard that, the previous day, one of his fellow moon walkers, the astronaut Pete Conrad, had died. The more Charlie spoke the more Andrew realised that his grief was something more than the mere fact of losing a friend. 'Now theres only nine of us,' he said. Only nine. Which meant that, one day not long from now, there would be none, and when that day came, no one on earth would have known the giddy thrill of gazing back at us from the surface of the moon. The thought shocked Andrew, and still does. Moondust is his attempt to understand why. The Apollo moon programme has been called the last optimistic act of the 20th Century. Over a strange three year period between 1969 and 1972, twelve men made the longest and most eccentric of all journeys, and all were indelibly marked by it. In Moondust Andrew sets out to interview all the remaining astronauts who walked on the moon, and to find out how their lives were changed for ever by what had happened. 'Where do you go after you've been to the moon?' In addition to this question that would prove hugely troubling to many of the returned astronauts, they also had to deal with the fantasies of faceless millions at their backs, for this was the first truly global media event. The walkers would forever be caught between the gravitational pull of the moon and the earth's collective dreaming.

The Science of Kissing

What Our Lips Are Telling Us

Author: Sheril Kirshenbaum

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 0446575135

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 4038

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From a noted science journalist comes a wonderfully witty and fascinating exploration of how and why we kiss. When did humans begin to kiss? Why is kissing integral to some cultures and alien to others? Do good kissers make the best lovers? And is that expensive lip-plumping gloss worth it? Sheril Kirshenbaum, a biologist and science journalist, tackles these questions and more in THE SCIENCE OF KISSING. It's everything you always wanted to know about kissing but either haven't asked, couldn't find out, or didn't realize you should understand. The book is informed by the latest studies and theories, but Kirshenbaum's engaging voice gives the information a light touch. Topics range from the kind of kissing men like to do (as distinct from women) to what animals can teach us about the kiss to whether or not the true art of kissing was lost sometime in the Dark Ages. Drawing upon classical history, evolutionary biology, psychology, popular culture, and more, Kirshenbaum's winning book will appeal to romantics and armchair scientists alike.