Palomino

Clinton Jencks and Mexican-American Unionism in the American Southwest

Author: James J. Lorence

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252094808

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 7396

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The first comprehensive biography of progressive labor organizer, peace worker, and economist Clinton Jencks (1918–2005), this book explores the life of one of the most important political and social activists to appear in the Southwestern United States in the twentieth century. A key figure in the radical International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers (IUMMSW) Local 890 in Grant County, New Mexico, Jencks was involved in organizing not only the mine workers but also their wives in the 1951 strike against the Empire Zinc Company. He was active in the production of the 1954 landmark labor film dramatizing the Empire Zinc strike, Salt of the Earth, which was heavily suppressed during the McCarthy era and led to Jencks's persecution by the federal government. Labor historian James J. Lorence examines the interaction between Jencks's personal experience and the broader forces that marked the world and society in which he worked and lived. Following the work of Jencks and his equally progressive wife, Virginia Derr Jencks, Lorence illuminates the roots and character of Southwestern unionism, the role of radicalism in the Mexican-American civil rights movement, the rise of working-class feminism within Local 890 and the Grant County Mexican American community, and the development of Mexican-American identity in the Southwest. Chronicling Jencks's five-year-long legal battle against charges of perjury, this biography also illustrates how civil liberties and American labor were constrained by the specter of anticommunism during the Cold War. Drawing from extensive research as well as interviews and correspondence, this volume highlights Clinton Jencks's dramatic influence on the history of labor culture in the Southwest through a lifetime devoted to progress and change for the social good.

Mexican Labor & World War II

Braceros in the Pacific Northwest, 1942-1947

Author: Erasmo Gamboa

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295978499

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 8806

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A study of the bracero program during World War II. It describes the labor history of Mexican and Chicano workers in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. It analyses the ways in which Braceros were active agents of their own lives. It also describes the living and working conditions in migrant farm camps.

¡Chicana Power!

Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement

Author: Maylei Blackwell

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292726902

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 8954

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The first book-length study of women's involvement in the Chicano Movement of the late 1960s and 1970s, ¡Chicana Power! tells the powerful story of the emergence of Chicana feminism within student and community-based organizations throughout southern California and the Southwest. As Chicanos engaged in widespread protest in their struggle for social justice, civil rights, and self-determination, women in el movimiento became increasingly militant about the gap between the rhetoric of equality and the organizational culture that suppressed women's leadership and subjected women to chauvinism, discrimination, and sexual harassment. Based on rich oral histories and extensive archival research, Maylei Blackwell analyzes the struggles over gender and sexuality within the Chicano Movement and illustrates how those struggles produced new forms of racial consciousness, gender awareness, and political identities. ¡Chicana Power! provides a critical genealogy of pioneering Chicana activist and theorist Anna NietoGomez and the Hijas de Cuauhtémoc, one of the first Latina feminist organizations, who together with other Chicana activists forged an autonomous space for women's political participation and challenged the gendered confines of Chicano nationalism in the movement and in the formation of the field of Chicana studies. She uncovers the multifaceted vision of liberation that continues to reverberate today as contemporary activists, artists, and intellectuals, both grassroots and academic, struggle for, revise, and rework the political legacy of Chicana feminism.

Chicano Timespace

The Poetry and Politics of Ricardo Sánchez

Author: Miguel R. López

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9780890969625

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 199

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The premature death of Ricardo Sánchez in 1995 marked the passing of an almost legendary figure in Chicano literature and in the Chicano political movement. A troubadour of Chicano Movement poetry, he established an anti-aesthetic that became the norm. Sánchez's autobiographical poetry forges a link between genres of the past and present and establishes him as the first great tragic figure of contemporary Chicano literature.In a body of work that spanned spatial, temporal, and cultural boundaries, Sánchez dealt with issues of power and of linguistic and cultural barriers between Anglo, Native American, and Mexican American peoples in the United States.While he lived, critics showed reluctance to engage Sánchez's work fully, perhaps in part because of his reputation as a confrontational, even outrageous individual. Focusing on Canto y grito mi liberación and Hechizospells, Miguel R. López examines Sánchez's work and places him in the context of the past, present, and future of Chicano literature. López explains clearly the relation of time and space in Sánchez's prolific work and shows him as a writer committed to his craft as well as to his political stance.In the end, the portrait that emerges is of a poet whose work was linguistically and thematically complex and one who was more passionate, controversial, and forthright in his expression than any other contemporary Chicano writer.

Historia

The Literary Making of Chicana and Chicano History

Author: Louis Gerard Mendoza

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585441792

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6839

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The author probes the contributions of literature in the great debate over Chicano identity, exploring the contributions of Mexican-America writers to this often hotly contested issue.

Soldados Razos at War

Chicano Politics, Identity, and Masculinity in the U.S. Military from World War II to Vietnam

Author: Steven Rosales

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816532443

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3680

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"This book explores the catalysts that motivated Mexican American youth to enlist from World War II through the Vietnam War"--Provided by publisher.

From Indians to Chicanos

The Dynamics of Mexican-American Culture, Third Edition

Author: James Diego Vigil

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 1478634839

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 2272

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Anthropologist-historian James Diego Vigil distills an enormous amount of information to provide a perceptive ethnohistorical introduction to the Mexican-American experience in the United States. He uses brief, clear outlines of each stage of Mexican-American history, charting the culture change sequences in the Pre-Columbian, Spanish Colonial, Mexican Independence and Nationalism, and Anglo-American and Mexicanization periods. In a very understandable fashion, he analyzes events and the underlying conditions that affect them. Readers become fully engaged with the historical developments and the specific socioeconomic, sociocultural, and sociopsychological forces involved in the dynamics that shaped contemporary Chicano life. Considered a pioneering achievement when first published, From Indians to Chicanos continues to offer readers an informed and penetrating approach to the history of Chicano development. The richly illustrated Third Edition incorporates data from the latest literature. Moreover, a new chapter updates discussions of immigration, institutional discrimination, the Mexicanization of the Chicano population, and issues of gender, labor, and education.

Memory, Community and Activism

Mexican Migration and Labor in the Pacific Northwest

Author: Jerry García,Gilberto García

Publisher: Michigan State University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 2495

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Memory, Community, and Activismis the first book-length study to critically examine the Mexican experience in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Many books deal with Chicano history, but few ever attempt to interpret or analyze it beyond the confines of the American Southwest. Eleven essays by leading scholars on the Mexican experience in the Northwest shed new light on immigration/migration, the Bracero program, the Catholic Church, race and race relations, Mexican culture, unionization, and Chicana feminism. This collection analyzes the Mexican experience from the early twentieth century to the present.

Becoming Mexican American

Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945

Author: George J. Sanchez

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199880034

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 2077

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Twentieth-century Los Angeles has been the locus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between variant cultures in American history. Yet this study is among the first to examine the relationship between ethnicity and identity among the largest immigrant group to that city. By focusing on Mexican immigrants to Los Angeles from 1900 to 1945, George J. S?nchez explores the process by which temporary sojourners altered their orientation to that of permanent residents, thereby laying the foundation for a new Mexican-American culture. Analyzing not only formal programs aimed at these newcomers by the United States and Mexico, but also the world created by these immigrants through family networks, religious practice, musical entertainment, and work and consumption patterns, S?nchez uncovers the creative ways Mexicans adapted their culture to life in the United States. When a formal repatriation campaign pushed thousands to return to Mexico, those remaining in Los Angeles launched new campaigns to gain civil rights as ethnic Americans through labor unions and New Deal politics. The immigrant generation, therefore, laid the groundwork for the emerging Mexican-American identity of their children.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674037649

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 3960

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The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

The Borderlands of Race

Mexican Segregation in a South Texas Town

Author: Jennifer R. Nájera

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292767552

Category: Social Science

Page: 195

View: 7690

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Throughout much of the twentieth century, Mexican Americans experienced segregation in many areas of public life, but the structure of Mexican segregation differed from the strict racial divides of the Jim Crow South. Factors such as higher socioeconomic status, lighter skin color, and Anglo cultural fluency allowed some Mexican Americans to gain limited access to the Anglo power structure. Paradoxically, however, this partial assimilation made full desegregation more difficult for the rest of the Mexican American community, which continued to experience informal segregation long after federal and state laws officially ended the practice. In this historical ethnography, Jennifer R. Nájera offers a layered rendering and analysis of Mexican segregation in a South Texas community in the first half of the twentieth century. Using oral histories and local archives, she brings to life Mexican origin peoples' experiences with segregation. Through their stories and supporting documentary evidence, Nájera shows how the ambiguous racial status of Mexican origin people allowed some of them to be exceptions to the rule of Anglo racial dominance. She demonstrates that while such exceptionality might suggest the permeability of the color line, in fact the selective and limited incorporation of Mexicans into Anglo society actually reinforced segregation by creating an illusion that the community had been integrated and no further changes were needed. Nájera also reveals how the actions of everyday people ultimately challenged racial/racist ideologies and created meaningful spaces for Mexicans in spheres historically dominated by Anglos.

Youth, Identity, Power

The Chicano Movement

Author: Carlos Muñoz

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9780860919131

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 3518

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Youth, Identity, Power is a study of the origins and development of Chicano radicalism in America. Written by a leader of the Chicano Student Movement of the 1960s who also played a role in the creation of the wider Chicano Power Movement, this is the first fill-length work to appear on the subject. It fills an important gap in the history of political protest in the United States. The author places the Chicano movement in the wider context of the political development of Mexicans and their descendants in the US, tracing the emergence of Chicano student activists in the 1930s and their initial challenge to the dominant racial and class ideologies of the time. Munoz then documents the rise and fall of the Chicano Power Movement, situating the student protests of the sixties within the changing political scene of the time, and assessing the movement's contribution to the cultural development of the Chicano population as a whole. He concludes with an account of Chicano politics in the 1980s. Youth, Identity, Power was named an Outstanding Book on Human Rights in the United States by the Gustavus Myers Center in 1990.

Invisible No More

Understanding the Disenfranchisement of Latino Men and Boys

Author: Pedro Noguera,Aída Hurtado,Edward Fergus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136700498

Category: Education

Page: 336

View: 1619

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Latino men and boys in the United States are confronted with a wide variety of hardships that are not easily explained or understood. They are populating prisons, dropping out of high school, and are becoming overrepresented in the service industry at alarming degrees. Young Latino men, especially, have among the lowest wages earned in the country, a rapidly growing rate of HIV/AIDS, and one of the highest mortality rates due to homicide. Although there has been growing interest in the status of men in American society, there is a glaring lack of research and scholarly work available on Latino men and boys. This groundbreaking interdisciplinary volume, edited by renowned scholars Pedro Noguera, Aída Hurtado and Edward Fergus addresses the dearth of scholarship and information about Latino men and boys to further our understanding of the unique challenges and obstacles that they confront during this historical moment. The contributors represent a cross section of disciplines from health, criminal justice, education, literature, psychology, economics, labor, sociology and more. By drawing attention to the sweeping issues facing this segment of the population, this volume offers research and policy a set of principles and overarching guidelines for decreasing the invisibility and thus the disenfranchisement of Latino men and boys.

How Race Is Made in America

Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

Author: Natalia Molina

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520280075

Category: History

Page: 207

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How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity. Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scripts, which highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.

The Accidental Archives of the Royal Chicano Air Force

Author: Stephanie Sauer

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9781477308707

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 4845

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How do you write a history of a group that has been written out of history? In The Accidental Archives of the Royal Chicano Air Force, world-famous archaeologist La Stef and the clandestine Con Sapos Archaeological Collective track down the "facts" about the elusive RCAF, the Rebel Chicano Art Front that, through an understandable mix-up with the Royal Canadian Air Force, became the Royal Chicano Air Force. La Stef and her fellow archaeologists document the plight and locura que cura of the RCAF, a group renowned for its fleet of adobe airplanes, ongoing subversive performance stance, and key role as poster makers for the United Farm Workers Union during the height of the Chicano civil rights movement. As the Con Sapos team uncovers tensions between fact and fiction in historical consciousness and public memory, they abandon didactic instruction and strive instead to offer a historiography in which various cultural paradigms already intersect seamlessly and on equal ground. That they often fail to navigate the blurred lines between "objective" Western archival sciences and Indigenous/Chicana/o cosmologies reflects the very human predicament of documenting the histories of complicated New Worlds everywhere. Uniquely blending art history, oral history, cultural studies, and anthropology, The Accidental Archives of the Royal Chicano Air Force suspends historical realities and leaps through epochs and between conversations with various historical figures, both dead and alive, to offer readers an intimate experience of RCAF history.

Chicano

Una Novela

Author: Richard Vasquez

Publisher: HarperCollins Español

ISBN: 0062238086

Category: Fiction

Page: 560

View: 5523

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Este libro, que fue un bestseller la primera vez que fue publicado hace 35 años, cuenta la historia de la familia Sandoval, una familia que huye a los Estados Unidos en busca de una mejor vida. Héctor, el patriarca de los Sandoval trabaja en el campo y lucha por alimentar a su familia mientras se enfrenta a la discriminación y la injusticia que encuentra esta nueva sociedad. De sus hijos, sólo Pete logra alcanzar una existencia un tanto más cómoda, o por lo menos por un tiempo. Pero cuando Mariana, la hija de Pete se enamora de un estudiante americano llamado David, el choque cultural es inminente. Por temor a lo que digan sus amigos y su familia, David se rehúsa a casarse con Mariana que sin embargo está embarazada con su hijo. Las complicaciones de su relación y la complejidad de sus diferencias culturales reflejan la cambiante realidad de la política racial en la cultura americana contemporánea.En la introducción, el aclamado y reconocido periodista Rubén Martínez, autor de Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail y The New Americans analiza el impacto que tuvo la primera publicación de Chicano, lo que hizo por la carrera del autor y se pregunta cómo ha cambiado nuestra percepción del texto desde su primera aparición.

Limits to Globalization

The Disruptive Geographies of Capitalist Development

Author: Alexander Von Humboldt Chair Eric Sheppard, PhD

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199681163

Category:

Page: 224

View: 2457

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This book summarizes how globalizing capitalism-the economic system now presumed to dominate the global economy-can be understood from a geographical perspective. This is in contrast to mainstream economic analysis, which theorizes globalizing capitalism as a system that is capable of enabling everyone to prosper and every place to achieve economic development. From this perspective, the globalizing capitalism perspective has the capacity to reduce poverty. Poverty's persistence is explained in terms of the dysfunctional attributes of poor people and places. A geographical perspective has two principal aspects: Taking seriously how the spatial organization of capitalism is altered by economic processes and the reciprocal effects of that spatial arrangement on economic development, and examining how economic processes co-evolve with cultural, political, and biophysical processes. From this, globalizing capitalism tends to reproduce social and spatial inequality; poverty's persistence is due to the ways in which wealth creation in some places results in impoverishment elsewhere.

Barrio Urbanism

Chicanos, Planning and American Cities

Author: David R. Diaz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135943206

Category: Architecture

Page: 360

View: 9314

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This, the first book on Latinos in America from an urban planning/policy perspective, covers the last century, and includes a substantial historical overview the subject. The authors trace the movement of Latinos (primarily Chicanos) into American cities from Mexico and then describe the problems facing them in those cities. They then show how the planning profession and developers consistently failed to meet their needs due to both poverty and racism. Attention is also paid to the most pressing concerns in Latino barrios during recent times, including environmental degradation and justice, land use policy, and others. The book closes with a consideration of the issues that will face Latinos as they become the nation's largest minority in the 21st century.

Class and Race Formation in North America

Author: James W. Russell

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802096784

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 3578

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"Russell's meticulously researched and highly detailed book presents a critically important people's history of North America. It provides rich insights and demonstrates the potential of comparative research to broaden our perspective." - Dan Zuberi, University of British Columbia