Civil Rights Since 1787

A Reader on the Black Struggle

Author: Jonathan Birnbaum,Clarence Taylor

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814782159

Category: History

Page: 936

View: 8259

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Winner of the 2001 Gustavus Myers Program Book Award. Contrary to simple textbook tales, the civil rights movement did not arise spontaneously in 1954 with the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision. The black struggle for civil rights can be traced back to the arrival of the first Africans, and to their work in the plantations, manufacturies, and homes of the Americas. Civil rights was thus born as labor history. Civil Rights Since 1787 tells the story of that struggle in its full context, dividing the struggle into six major periods, from slavery to Reconstruction, from segregation to the Second Reconstruction, and from the current backlash to the future prospects for a Third Reconstruction. The "prize" that the movement has sought has often been reduced to a quest for the vote in the South. But all involved in the struggle have always known that the prize is much more than the vote, that the goal is economic as well as political. Further, in distinction from other work, Civil Rights Since 1787 establishes the links between racial repression and the repression of labor and the left, and emphasizes the North as a region of civil rights struggle. Featuring the voices and philosophies of orators, activists, and politicians, this anthology emphasizes the role of those ignored by history, as well as the part that education and religion have played in the movement. Civil Rights Since 1787 serves up an informative mix of primary documents and secondary analysis and includes the work of such figures as Ella Baker, Mary Frances Berry, Clayborne Carson, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Eric Foner, Herb Gutman, Fannie Lou Hamer, A. Leon Higginbotham, Darlene Clark Hine, Jesse Jackson, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Manning Marable, Nell Painter, Frances Fox Piven and Richard Cloward, A. Philip Randolph, Mary Church Terrell, and Howard Zinn.

Human Trafficking

Applying Research, Theory, and Case Studies

Author: Noël Bridget Busch-Armendariz,Maura Nsonwu,Laurie Cook Heffron

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1506305709

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 1826

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Human Trafficking: Applying Research, Theory, and Case Studies is a practical, interdisciplinary text that draws from empirically grounded scholarship, survivor-centered practices, and an ecological perspective to help readers develop an understanding of the meaning and scope of human trafficking. Throughout the book, authors Noël Bridget Busch-Armendariz , Maura Nsonwu, and Laurie Cook Heffron address the specific vulnerabilities of human trafficking victims, their medical-psycho-social needs, and issues related to direct service delivery. They also address the identification of human trafficking crimes, traffickers, and the impact of this crime on the global economy. Using detailed case studies to illuminate real situations, the book covers national and international anti-trafficking policies, prevention and intervention strategies, promising practices to combat human trafficking, responses of law enforcement and service providers, organizational challenges, and the cost of trafficking to human wellbeing.

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939

Author: Robert L Harris Jr.,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023151087X

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 4658

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This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.

The Routledge History of Twentieth-Century America

Author: Jerald Podair,Darren Dochuk

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317485661

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 7430

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The Routledge History of the Twentieth-Century United States is a comprehensive introduction to the most important trends and developments in the study of modern United States history. Driven by interdisciplinary scholarship, the thirty-four original chapters underscore the vast range of identities, perspectives and tensions that contributed to the growth and contested meanings of the United States in the twentieth century. The chronological and topical breadth of the collection highlights critical political and economic developments of the century while also drawing attention to relatively recent areas of research, including borderlands, technology and disability studies. Dynamic and flexible in its possible applications, The Routledge History of the Twentieth-Century United States offers an exciting new resource for the study of modern American history.

Freedom's Main Line

The Journey of Reconciliation and the Freedom Rides

Author: Derek Catsam

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813173108

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 6180

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Black Americans in the Jim Crow South could not escape the grim reality of racial segregation, whether enforced by law or by custom. In Freedom’s Main Line: The Journey of Reconciliation and the Freedom Rides, author Derek Charles Catsam shows that courtrooms, classrooms, and cemeteries were not the only front lines in African Americans’ prolonged struggle for basic civil rights. Buses, trains, and other modes of public transportation provided the perfect means for civil rights activists to protest the second-class citizenship of African Americans, bringing the reality of the violence of segregation into the consciousness of America and the world. In 1947, nearly a decade before the Supreme Court voided school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, sixteen black and white activists embarked on a four-state bus tour, called the Journey of Reconciliation, to challenge discrimination in busing and other forms of public transportation. Although the Journey drew little national attention, it set the stage for the more timely and influential 1961 Freedom Rides. After the Supreme Court’s 1960 ruling in Boynton v. Virginia that segregated public transportation violated the Interstate Commerce Act, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and other civil rights groups organized the Freedom Rides to test the enforcement of the ruling in buses and bus terminals across the South. Their goal was simple: “to make bus desegregation,” as a CORE press release put it, “a reality instead of merely an approved legal doctrine.” Freedom’s Main Line argues that the Freedom Rides, a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement, were a logical, natural evolution of such earlier efforts as the Journey of Reconciliation, their organizers following models provided by previous challenges to segregation and relying on the principles of nonviolence so common in the larger movement. The impact of the Freedom Rides, however, was unprecedented, fixing the issue of civil rights in the national consciousness. Later activists were often dubbed Freedom Riders even if they never set foot on a bus. With challenges to segregated transportation as his point of departure, Catsam chronicles black Americans’ long journey toward increased civil rights. Freedom’s Main Line tells the story of bold incursions into the heart of institutional discrimination, journeys undertaken by heroic individuals who forced racial injustice into the national and international spotlight and helped pave the way for the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Freedom Facts and Firsts

400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience

Author: Jessie Carney Smith,Linda T Wynn

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 1578592607

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 6841

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Spanning nearly 400 years from the early abolitionists to the present, this guide book profiles more than 400 people, places, and events that have shaped the history of the black struggle for freedom. Coverage includes information on such mainstay figures as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and Rosa Parks, but also delves into how lesser known figures contributed to and shaped the history of civil rights. Learn how the Housewives' League of Detroit started a nationwide movement to support black businesses, helping many to survive the depression; or discover what effect sports journalist Samuel Harold Lacy had on Jackie Robinson's historic entrance into the major leagues. This comprehensive resource chronicles the breadth and passion of an entire people's quest for freedom.

The Logic of Political Violence

Lessons in Reform and Revolution

Author: Craig Rosebraugh

Publisher: PM Press

ISBN: 0974288411

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 8376

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Within Westernized societies, particularly the United States, there has been a near-universal acceptance that nonviolent action has been the foundation on which the progress and/or success of political and social justice movements have been built. Yet, contrary to popular belief, political violence has played a crucial role in advancing historic justice struggles. This breakthrough study examines the historic roles that both nonviolence and political violence have played in international social and political movements. The profound and well-researched conclusions presented advocate the necessity of political and social revolution in the United States--using any means necessary. This is an excellent resource for those contemplating political and social change and for anyone involved in political and social movements, especially those wondering why single-issue pursuits rarely, if ever, are successful. Challenging the predominant societal norms on the political and social change process in the United States, this is an important contribution to the struggle that may very well become the new American revolution.

Boston Against Busing

Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the 1960s and 1970s

Author: Ronald P. Formisano

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807869708

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 8627

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Perhaps the most spectacular reaction to court-ordered busing in the 1970s occurred in Boston, where there was intense and protracted protest. Ron Formisano explores the sources of white opposition to school desegregation. Racism was a key factor, Formisano argues, but racial prejudice alone cannot explain the movement. Class resentment, ethnic rivalries, and the defense of neighborhood turf all played powerful roles in the protest. In a new epilogue, Formisano brings the story up to the present day, describing the end of desegregation orders in Boston and other cities. He also examines the nationwide trend toward the resegregation of schools, which he explains is the result of Supreme Court decisions, attacks on affirmative action, white flight, and other factors. He closes with a brief look at the few school districts that have attempted to base school assignment policies on class or economic status.

I've Got a Home in Glory Land

A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad

Author: Karolyn Smardz Frost

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1466806125

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 2276

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It was the day before Independence Day, 1831. As his bride, Lucie, was about to be "sold down the river" to the slave markets of New Orleans, young Thornton Blackburn planned a daring—and successful—daylight escape from Louisville. But they were discovered by slave catchers in Michigan and slated to return to Kentucky in chains, until the black community rallied to their cause. The Blackburn Riot of 1833 was the first racial uprising in Detroit history. The couple was spirited across the river to Canada, but their safety proved illusory. In June 1833, Michigan's governor demanded their extradition. The Blackburn case was the first serious legal dispute between Canada and the United States regarding the Underground Railroad. The impassioned defense of the Blackburns by Canada's lieutenant governor set precedents for all future fugitive-slave cases. The Blackburns settled in Toronto and founded the city's first taxi business. But they never forgot the millions who still suffered in slavery. Working with prominent abolitionists, Thornton and Lucie made their home a haven for runaways. The Blackburns died in the 1890s, and their fascinating tale was lost to history. Lost, that is, until a chance archaeological discovery in a downtown Toronto school yard brought the story of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn again to light.

A People s Art History of the United States

250 Years of Activist Art and Artists Working in Social Justice Movements

Author: Nicolas Lampert

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595589317

Category: Art

Page: 384

View: 9130

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Most people outside of the art world view art as something that is foreign to their experiences and everyday lives. A People’s Art History of the United States places art history squarely in the rough–and–tumble of politics, social struggles, and the fight for justice from the colonial era through the present day. Author and radical artist Nicolas Lampert combines historical sweep with detailed examinations of individual artists and works in a politically charged narrative that spans the conquest of the Americas, the American Revolution, slavery and abolition, western expansion, the suffragette movement and feminism, civil rights movements, environmental movements, LGBT movements, antiglobalization movements, contemporary antiwar movements, and beyond. A People’s Art History of the United States introduces us to key works of American radical art alongside dramatic retellings of the histories that inspired them. Stylishly illustrated with over two hundred images, this book is nothing less than an alternative education for anyone interested in the powerful role that art plays in our society.

Toward a Literacy of Promise

Joining the African-American Struggle

Author: Linda A. Spears-Bunton,Rebecca Powell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3078

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"[This book] gives us strategies for bringing life back to school; it allows us to think creatively about connecting instruction to the lives of children who have not been well-served; it helps us learn to value the gifts with words our children of color bring; and it gives us hope for educating a generation that can change the status quo, that will build the America we have yet to see...the one that made that as-yet-unfulfilled promise of 'liberty and justice for all.'" Lisa Delpit, From the Foreword Toward a Literacy of Promise examines popular assumptions about literacy and challenges readers to question how it has been used historically both to empower and to oppress. The authors offer an alternative view of literacy – a "literacy of promise" – that charts an emancipatory agenda for literacy instructional practices in schools. Weaving together critical perspectives on pedagogy, language, literature, and popular texts, each chapter provides an in-depth discussion that illuminates how a literacy of promise can be realized in school and classrooms. Although the major focus is on African American middle and secondary students as a population that has experienced the consequences of inequality, the chapters demonstrate general and specific applications to other populations.

Slavery in the United States

A Social, Political, and Historical Encyclopedia

Author: Junius P. Rodriguez

Publisher: Abc-Clio Incorporated

ISBN: 9781851095445

Category: History

Page: 793

View: 9646

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Thematic essays, primary source documents, and a chronology enhance the alphabetically-arranged entries tracing the historical, social, and political aspects of slavery in the United States.

America, History and Life

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Canada

Page: N.A

View: 8886

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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Black Religious Intellectuals

The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the 21st Century

Author: Clarence Taylor

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136061703

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 2297

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Professor Clarence Taylor sheds some much-needed light on the rich intellectual and political tradition that lies in the black religious community. From the Pentecostalism of Bishop Smallwood Williams and the flamboyant leadership of the Reverend Al Sharpton, to the radical Presbyterianism of Milton Arthur Galamison and the controversial and mass-mobilization by Minister Louis Farrakhan, black religious leaders have figured prominently in the struggle for social equality in America.