Divine Wind

The History and Science of Hurricanes

Author: Kerry Emanuel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199727346

Category: Nature

Page: 296

View: 4561

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Imagine standing at the center of a Roman coliseum that is 20 miles across, with walls that soar 10 miles into the sky, towering walls with cascades of ice crystals falling along its brilliantly white surface. That's what it's like to stand in the eye of a hurricane. In Divine Wind, Kerry Emanuel, one of the world's leading authorities on hurricanes, gives us an engaging account of these awe-inspiring meteorological events, revealing how hurricanes and typhoons have literally altered human history, thwarting military incursions and changing the course of explorations. Offering an account of the physics of the tropical atmosphere, the author explains how such benign climates give rise to the most powerful storms in the world and tells what modern science has learned about them. Interwoven with this scientific account are descriptions of some of the most important hurricanes in history and relevant works of art and literature. For instance, he describes the 17th-century hurricane that likely inspired Shakespeare's The Tempest and that led to the British colonization of Bermuda. We also read about the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, by far the worst natural calamity in U.S. history, with a death toll between 8,000 and 12,000 that exceeded the San Francisco earthquake, the Johnstown Flood, and the Okeechobee Hurricane co Boasting more than one hundred color illustrations, frommbined. Boasting more than one hundred color illustrations, from ultra-modern Doppler imagery to classic paintings by Winslow Homer, Divine Wind captures the profound effects that hurricanes have had on humanity. Its fascinating blend of history, science, and art will appeal to weather junkies, science buffs, and everyone who read Isaac's Storm.

What We Know about Climate Change

Author: Kerry A. Emanuel

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262018438

Category: Science

Page: 96

View: 3369

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Offers an introduction to the scientific consensus on the human role in global warming.

Hurricane Watch

Forecasting the Deadliest Storms on Earth

Author: Jack Williams,Bob Sheets

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0375713980

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 784

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The ultimate guide to the ultimate storms, Hurricane Watch is a fascinating blend of science and history from one of the world's foremost meteorologists and an award-winning science journalist. This in-depth look at these awe-inspiring acts of nature covers everything from the earliest efforts by seafarers at predicting storms to the way satellite imaging is revolutionizing hurricane forecasting. It reveals the latest information on hurricanes: their effects on ocean waves, the causes of the variable wind speeds in different parts of the storm, and the origins of the super-cooled shafts of water that vent at high altitudes. Hurricane Watch is a compelling history of man's relationship with the deadliest storms on earth. Includes: - The story of the nineteenth-century Cuban Jesuit whose success at predicting the great cyclones was considered almost mystical. - A new look at Isaac Cline, whose infamous failure to predict the Galveston Hurricane left him obsessed with the devastating effects of storm surge. - The story of the Hurricane Hunters, including the first man ever to deliberately fly into a hurricane. - A complete account of how computer modeling has changed hurricane tracking. - A history of Project Stormfury: the only significant, organized effort to reduce the damaging strength of severe hurricanes. - A unique firsthand account of Hurricane Andrew by both authors, who were at the National Hurricane Center when Andrew struck. - A listing of the deadliest storms in history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Encyclopedia of Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones, New Edition

Author: David Longshore

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438118791

Category: Cyclones

Page: 481

View: 7809

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Features significant updates and information on recent weather phenomena and the devastation and loss that resulted. Hurricanes Andrew, Dean, Felix, Gilbert, and Wilma are covered in detail, as well as the most destructive and deadly tropical cyclone witnessed in the United States in the last 50 years, Hurricane Katrina.

Eye of the Storm

A Book about Hurricanes

Author: Rick Thomas

Publisher: Capstone Classroom

ISBN: 9781404818453

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 3073

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Looks at hurricanes, how they form, the effects they can have, and how to stay safe.

Hurricane Almanac 2006

The Essential Guide to Storms Past, Present, and Future

Author: Bryan Norcross

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 1466870680

Category: Reference

Page: 288

View: 720

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Bryan Norcross's pioneering and courageous TV coverage of Hurricane Andrew in 1992 helped thousands of people in Florida cope with the killer storm. With hurricanes back in the headlines and destined to stay there, one of America's leading experts offers a unique almanac compiling hundreds of nuggets of fascinating, useful, and potentially life-saving information. Bryan Norcross's Hurricane Almanac 2006 reviews the catastrophic season of 2005, including Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma, looks forward to hurricane seasons to come, highlights the fascinating history of hurricanes interacting with civilization, and details our rapidly increasingly ability -- but still with limitations -- to predict the severity and paths of storms. Key sections offer checklists of items needed to make homes, businesses, and people safe during storms, and where to find the best information before and during a storm and how to best interpret it. Bryan will also include a provocative chapter entitled: What I'd do better: ideas for a better hurricane system.

Hurricanes of the Gulf of Mexico

Author: Barry D. Keim,Robert A. Muller

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807136676

Category: Nature

Page: 240

View: 9275

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"The storm has entered the Gulf." For those who live or travel near the Gulf of Mexico, this ominous announcement commands attention, especially given the frequency and force of hurricane strikes in recent years. Since 2004, the shores around the Gulf of Mexico have been in the crosshairs for an increasing number of hurricanes and tropical storms, including Charley and Wilma in southwestern Florida and Ivan, Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike along the northern Gulf coast from Panama City to near Galveston. In this definitive guide, climatologists Barry D. Keim and Robert A. Muller examine the big picture of Gulf hurricanes -- from the 1800s to the present and from Key West, Florida, to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula -- providing an extraordinary compilation and interpretation of the entire region's hurricane and tropical storm history. Drawing from their own research and from National Hurricane Center records, Keim and Muller examine numerous individual Gulf storms, considering each hurricane's origin, oceanic and atmospheric influences, seasonality, track, intensity, size, point of landfall, storm surge, and impact on life, property, and the environment. They describe the unique features of the Gulf that influence the development of hurricanes, such as the loop current and its eddies, and identify areas of the coastline that are more or less vulnerable because of physical environment, socioeconomic environment, or both. They point out that the increase in population along the Gulf Coast over the past century has led to a rise in hurricane damage as once sparse coastlines are now lined with residents, commerce, and industry. In addition, they assess predicted hurricane activity for coming years in light of competing climate theories as well as cyclical patterns over the past century. Keim and Muller begin their book by scrutinizing the Gulf's deadliest storm, the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, whose victims received little to no warning of its approach. They then retrace 2005's Hurricane Katrina, the most costly storm, using NHC advisories and reports. Their comparison of these two catastrophic events shows that despite 105 years of tremendous technological advances, hurricanes remain ultimately rather unpredictable and human warning, readiness, and response measures continue to be imperfect. Keim and Muller also detail other memorable Gulf storms -- the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, Audrey, Betsy, Camille, Gilbert, Andrew, Wilma, and more -- and give the hurricane strike records from 1901 to 2005 at thirty locations around the Gulf. They extend the New Orleans hurricane strike record back to the middle of the nineteenth century, providing key insight into comparisons of storm activities during the two centuries. An epilogue summarizes the destructive 2008 hurricane season, including storms Dolly, Gustav, and Ike. Plentiful maps, charts, tables, graphs, and photos, along with anecdotal observations and an informative text, make Hurricanes of the Gulf of Mexico a captivating and useful volume for Gulf residents, storm trackers, or anyone fascinated by the weather.

Sudden Sea

The Great Hurricane of 1938

Author: R.A. Scotti

Publisher: Back Bay Books

ISBN: 031605478X

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1976

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The massive destruction wreaked by the Hurricane of 1938 dwarfed that of the Chicago Fire, the San Francisco Earthquake, and the Mississippi floods of 1927, making the storm the worst natural disaster in U.S. history. Now, R.A. Scotti tells the story.

The Great Hurricane of 1780

The Story of the Greatest and Deadliest Hurricane of the Caribbean and the Americas

Author: Wayne Neely

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781475949278

Category: Nature

Page: 283

View: 1016

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"The Great Hurricane of 1780," also known as Hurricane San Calixto II, is one of the most powerful and deadliest North Atlantic hurricanes on record. Often regarded as a cataclysmic hurricane, the storm's worst effects were experienced on October 10, 1780. In "The Great Hurricane of 1780," author Wayne Neely chronicles the chaos and destruction it brought to the Caribbean. This storm was likely generated in the mid Atlantic, not far from the equator; it was first felt in Barbados, where just about every tree and house on the island was blown down. The storm passed through the Lesser Antilles and a small portion of the Greater Antilles in the Caribbean between October 10 and October 16 of 1780.Because the storm hit several of the most populous islands in the Caribbean, the death toll was very high. The official death toll was approximately 22,000 people but some historians have put the death toll as high as 27,500. Specifics on the hurricane's track and strength are unclear since the official North Atlantic hurricane database only goes back as far as 1851. Even so, it is a fact that this hurricane had a tremendous impact on economies in the Caribbean and parts of North America, and perhaps also played a major role in the outcome of the American Revolution. This thoroughly researched history considers the intense storm and its aftermath, offering an exploration of an important historical weather event that has been neglected in previous study.

Storm World

Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming

Author: Chris Mooney

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547416083

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 842

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An investigation into climate change and increasingly dangerous hurricanes from the New York Times–bestselling author of The Republican War on Science. A leading science journalist delves into a red-hot debate in meteorology: whether the increasing ferocity of hurricanes is connected to global warming. In the wake of Katrina, Chris Mooney follows the careers of leading scientists on either side of the argument through the 2006 hurricane season, tracing how the media, special interests, politics, and the weather itself have skewed and amplified what was already a fraught scientific debate. As Mooney puts it: “Scientists, like hurricanes, do extraordinary things at high wind speeds.” Mooney—a New Orleans native, host of the Point of Inquiry podcast, and author of The Republican Brain—has written “a well-researched, nuanced book” that closely examines whether we as a society should be held responsible for making hurricanes even bigger monsters than they already are (The New York Times). “Mooney serves his readers as both an empiricist who gathers data and an analyst who puts it into context. The result is an important book, whose author succeeds admirably in both his roles.” —The Plain Dealer “Engaging and readable . . . Mooney catches real science in the act and, in so doing, weaves a story as intriguing as it is important.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review “Mooney has hit upon an important and controversial topic, and attacks it with vigor.” —The Boston Globe “An absorbing, informed account of the politics behind a pressing contemporary controversy.” —Kirkus Reviews

Sea of Storms

A History of Hurricanes in the Greater Caribbean from Columbus to Katrina

Author: Stuart B. Schwartz

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400852080

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 6322

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The diverse cultures of the Caribbean have been shaped as much by hurricanes as they have by diplomacy, commerce, or the legacy of colonial rule. In this panoramic work of social history, Stuart Schwartz examines how Caribbean societies have responded to the dangers of hurricanes, and how these destructive storms have influenced the region's history, from the rise of plantations, to slavery and its abolition, to migrations, racial conflict, and war. Taking readers from the voyages of Columbus to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, Schwartz looks at the ethical, political, and economic challenges that hurricanes posed to the Caribbean’s indigenous populations and the different European peoples who ventured to the New World to exploit its riches. He describes how the United States provided the model for responding to environmental threats when it emerged as a major power and began to exert its influence over the Caribbean in the nineteenth century, and how the region’s governments came to assume greater responsibilities for prevention and relief, efforts that by the end of the twentieth century were being questioned by free-market neoliberals. Schwartz sheds light on catastrophes like Katrina by framing them within a long and contentious history of human interaction with the natural world. Spanning more than five centuries and drawing on extensive archival research in Europe and the Americas, Sea of Storms emphasizes the continuing role of race, social inequality, and economic ideology in the shaping of our responses to natural disaster. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Hurricanes and Typhoons

Author: Jen Green

Publisher: Copper Beech Books

ISBN: 9780761308676

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 7869

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Explains the causes and effects of hurricanes and typhoons and examines their environmental impact and how they can be predicted.

Perils of a Restless Planet

Scientific Perspectives on Natural Disasters

Author: Ernest Zebrowski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521654883

Category: Nature

Page: 324

View: 2335

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Traces the process of scientific inquiry, technological innovation, and public policy used to deal with such natural disasters as epidemics, tornadoes, and tidal waves, focusing on actual events from ancient times to the present. UP.

Atmospheric Thermodynamics

Elementary Physics and Chemistry

Author: Gerald R. North,Tatiana L. Erukhimova

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052189963X

Category: Science

Page: 267

View: 2890

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Textbook that uniquely integrates physics and chemistry in the study of atmospheric thermodynamics for advanced single-semester courses.

Winds of Change

Hurricanes & the Transformation of Nineteenth-century Cuba

Author: Louis A. Pérez

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807849286

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 8027

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Literary and eyewitness accounts, economic records, and agricultural data show how catastropic and lesser hurricanes in the mid-1800s transformed Cuban politics, economy, social relationships, and national identity.

Happiness

The Science Behind Your Smile

Author: Daniel Nettle

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191604747

Category: Psychology

Page: 224

View: 581

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What exactly is happiness? Can we measure it? Why are some people happy and others not? And is there a drug that could eliminate all unhappiness? People all over the world, and throughout the ages, have thought about happiness, argued about its nature, and, most of all, desired it. But why do we have such a strong instinct to pursue happiness? And if happiness is good in itself, why haven't we simply evolved to be happier? Daniel Nettle uses the results of the latest psychological studies to ask what makes people happy and unhappy, what happiness really is, and to examine our urge to achieve it. Along the way we look at brain systems, at mind-altering drugs, and how happiness is now marketed to us as a commodity. Nettle concludes that while it may be unrealistic to expect lasting happiness, our evolved tendency to seek happiness drives us to achieve much that is worthwhile in itself. What is more, it seems to be not your particular circumstances that define whether you are happy so much as your attitude towards life. Happiness gives us the latest scientific insights into the nature of our feelings of well-being, and what these imply for how we might live our lives.

Atmospheric Convection

Author: Kerry A. Emanuel

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195066302

Category: Nature

Page: 580

View: 4563

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This graduate-level meteorology text and reference provides a scientifically rigorous description of the many types of convective circulations in the Earth's atmosphere. These range from small-scale, convectively driven turbulences in the boundary layer to precipitating systems covering many thousands of square kilometers. The text introduces the principal techniques used in understanding and predicting convective motion: theory, field experiment, and numerical modelling. Part I explores dry convection, including turbulent plumes and thermals from isolated buoyancy sources, Raleigh-Benard convection, and turbulent convection in the planetary boundary layer. Emphasis is placed on applying theoretical understanding and lessons from experiments. Part II offers a complete treatment of the thermodynamics of moist and cloudy air, including fundamental laws, conserved quantities, graphical techniques, and stability. Part III explores the characteristics of individual convective clouds, thunderstorms, squall lines, mesoscale convective systems, and slantwise convection. Part IV studies the ensemble effects of convective clouds, including stratocumulus at trade cumulus boundary layers and the representation of convective clouds in numerical models. Each chapter is followed by a set of exercises.

Storm of the Century

The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935

Author: Willie Drye

Publisher: National Geographic Society

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 1166

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A chronicle of the most powerful hurricane ever to hit the United States and its aftermath details the storm of September 1935 as seen by survivors, Federal Emergency Relief Administration staff, and government officials.

The Man Who Caught the Storm

The Life of Legendary Tornado Chaser Tim Samaras

Author: Brantley Hargrove

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476796114

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1750

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“An instant classic of Americana—a story of tragedy, invention, lore, science, and a most original kind of genius.” —Hampton Sides “Masterful. This is what man versus nature is all about.” —Skip Hollandsworth The Man Who Caught the Storm is the saga of the greatest tornado chaser who ever lived: a tale of obsession and daring, and an extraordinary account of humanity’s high-stakes race to understand nature’s fiercest phenomenon. At the turn of the twenty-first century, the tornado was one of the last true mysteries of the modern world. It was a monster that ravaged the American heartland a thousand times each year, yet science’s every effort to divine its inner workings had ended in failure. Researchers all but gave up, until the arrival of an outsider. In a field of PhDs, Tim Samaras didn’t attend a day of college in his life. He chased storms with brilliant tools of his own invention and pushed closer to the tornado than anyone else ever dared. When he achieved what meteorologists had deemed impossible, it was as if he had snatched the fire of the gods. Yet even as he transformed the field, Samaras kept on pushing. As his ambitions grew, so did the risks. And when he finally met his match—in a faceoff against the largest tornado ever recorded—it upended everything he thought he knew. Brantley Hargrove delivers a masterful tale, chronicling the life of Tim Samaras in all its triumph and tragedy. He takes readers inside the thrill of the chase, the captivating science of tornadoes, and the remarkable character of a man who walked the line between life and death in pursuit of knowledge. Following the tradition of Into Thin Air and The Perfect Storm, Hargrove’s debut offers an unforgettable exploration of obsession and the extremes of the natural world.