Epistemic Injustice

Power and the Ethics of Knowing

Author: Miranda Fricker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198237901

Category: Philosophy

Page: 188

View: 1153

DOWNLOAD NOW »
No further information has been provided for this title.

Epistemic Injustice

Power and the Ethics of Knowing

Author: Miranda Fricker

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199570522

Category: Philosophy

Page: 188

View: 3133

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Epistemic Injustice explores a form of injustice which has so far been largely ignored in English-language philosophy: epistemic injustice - that is to say, a wrong suffered in one's capacity as a knower. Miranda Fricker distinguishes two forms of epistemic injustice: testimonial injustice and hermeneutical injustice. In connection with both, she argues that our testimonial sensibility needs to incorporate a corrective, anti-prejudicial virtue that canbe used to promote a more veridical and a more democratic epistemic practice.

Epistemic Injustice:Power and the Ethics of Knowing

Power and the Ethics of Knowing

Author: Miranda Fricker

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0198237901

Category: Philosophy

Page: 198

View: 5478

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this exploration of new territory between ethics and epistemology, Miranda Fricker argues that there is a distinctively epistemic type of injustice, in which someone is wronged specifically in their capacity as a knower. Justice is one of the oldest and most central themes in philosophy, but in order to reveal the ethical dimension of our epistemic practices the focus must shift to injustice. Fricker adjusts the philosophical lens so that we see through to the negative space thatis epistemic injustice.The book explores two different types of epistemic injustice, each driven by a form of prejudice, and from this exploration comes a positive account of two corrective ethical-intellectual virtues. The characterization of these phenomena casts light on many issues, such as social power, prejudice, virtue, and the genealogy of knowledge, and it proposes a virtue epistemological account of testimony. In this ground-breaking book, the entanglements of reason and social power are traced in a newway, to reveal the different forms of epistemic injustice and their place in the broad pattern of social injustice.

The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice

Author: Ian James Kidd,Associate Professor of Philosophy Jose Medina, Sthd,José Medina,Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351814508

Category: Philosophy

Page: 456

View: 9221

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In the era of information and communication, issues of misinformation and miscommunication are more pressing than ever. Epistemic injustice - one of the most important and ground-breaking subjects to have emerged in philosophy in recent years - refers to those forms of unfair treatment that relate to issues of knowledge, understanding, and participation in communicative practices. The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject. The first collection of its kind, it comprises over thirty chapters by a team of international contributors, divided into five parts: Core Concepts Liberatory Epistemologies and Axes of Oppression Schools of Thought and Subfields within Epistemology Socio-political, Ethical, and Psychological Dimensions of Knowing Case Studies of Epistemic Injustice. As well as fundamental topics such as testimonial and hermeneutic injustice and epistemic trust, the Handbook includes chapters on important issues such as social and virtue epistemology, objectivity and objectification, implicit bias, and gender and race. Also included are chapters on areas in applied ethics and philosophy, such as law, education, and healthcare. The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice is essential reading for students and researchers in ethics, epistemology, political philosophy, feminist theory, and philosophy of race. It will also be very useful for those in related fields, such as cultural studies, sociology, education and law.

Virtues of the Mind

An Inquiry Into the Nature of Virtue and the Ethical Foundations of Knowledge

Author: Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521578264

Category: Philosophy

Page: 365

View: 5983

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This remarkable book is the first attempt to establish a theory of knowledge based on the model of virtue theory in ethics.

The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy

Author: Miranda Fricker,Jennifer Hornsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521624695

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

View: 5196

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The thirteen specially-commissioned essays in this volume are designed to provide an accessible and stimulating guide through an area of philosophical thought and literature that has seen massive expansion in recent years. They encompass all the core subject areas commonly taught in anglophone undergraduate and graduate philosophy courses, offering both an overview of and a contribution to the relevant debates. This volume will be essential reading for any student or teacher of philosophy who is curious about the place of feminism in their subject.

Social Epistemology

Essential Readings

Author: Alvin I. Goldman,Dennis Whitcomb

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195334531

Category: Philosophy

Page: 357

View: 3420

DOWNLOAD NOW »
An outstanding voice in the field, the jazz critic for The Village Voice leads readers through the first century of the music in a voluminous, expert account of the great jazz artists past and present and their distinctive contributions. UP.

Ecological Thinking

The Politics of Epistemic Location

Author: Lorraine Code

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195159438

Category: Philosophy

Page: 322

View: 2440

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Arguing that ecological thinking can animate an epistemology capable of addressing feminist, multicultural, and other post-colonial concerns, this book critiques the instrumental rationality, hyperbolized autonomy, abstract individualism, and exploitation of people and places that western epistemologies of mastery have legitimated. It proposes a politics of epistemic location, sensitive to the interplay of particularity and diversity, and focused on responsible epistemic practices. Starting from an epistemological approach implicit in Rachel Carson's scientific projects, the book draws, constructively and critically, on ecological theory and practice, on (post-Quinean) naturalized epistemology, and on feminist and post-colonial theory. Analyzing extended examples from developmental psychology, from medicine and law, and from circumstances where vulnerability, credibility, and public trust are at issue, the argument addresses the constitutive part played by an instituted social imaginary in shaping and regulating human lives. The practices and examples discussed invoke the responsibility requirements central to this text's larger purpose of imagining, crafting, articulating a creative, innovative, instituting social imaginary, committed to interrogating entrenched hierarchical social structures, en route to enacting principles of ideal cohabitation.

The Epistemology of Resistance

Gender and Racial Oppression, Epistemic Injustice, and the Social Imagination

Author: José Medina

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199929025

Category: Philosophy

Page: 332

View: 6956

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book explores the epistemic side of racial and sexual oppression. It elucidates how social insensitivities and imposed silences prevent members of different groups from listening to each other.

Feminist Epistemologies

Author: Linda Alcoff,Elizabeth Potter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113497664X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 324

View: 3687

DOWNLOAD NOW »
First published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Resisting Reality

Social Construction and Social Critique

Author: Sally Haslanger

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199892644

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 6822

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Contemporary theorists use the term "social construction" with the aim of exposing how what's purportedly "natural" is often at least partly social and, more specifically, how this masking of the social is politically significant. In these previously published essays, Sally Haslanger draws on insights from feminist and critical race theory to explore and develop the idea that gender and race are positions within a structure of social relations. On this interpretation, the point of saying that gender and race are socially constructed is not to make a causal claim about the origins of our concepts of gender and race, or to take a stand in the nature/nurture debate, but to locate these categories within a realist social ontology. This is politically important, for by theorizing how gender and race fit within different structures of social relations we are better able to identify and combat forms of systematic injustice. Although the central essays of the book focus on a critical social realism about gender and race, these accounts function as case studies for a broader critical social realism. To develop this broader approach, several essays offer reworked notions of ideology, practice, and social structure, drawing on recent research in sociology and social psychology. Ideology, on the proposed view, is a relatively stable set of shared dispositions to respond to the world, often in ways that also shape the world to evoke those very dispositions. This looping of our dispositions through the material world enables the social to appear natural. Additional essays in the book situate this approach to social phenomena in relation to philosophical methodology, and to specific debates in metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language. The book as a whole explores the interface between analytic philosophy and critical theory.

Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics

Debunking and Dispensability

Author: Uri D. Leibowitz,Neil Sinclair

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191084263

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 1495

DOWNLOAD NOW »
How far should our realism extend? For many years philosophers of mathematics and philosophers of ethics have worked independently to address the question of how best to understand the entities apparently referred to by mathematical and ethical talk. But the similarities between their endeavours are not often emphasised. This book provides that emphasis. In particular, it focuses on two types of argumentative strategies that have been deployed in both areas. The first—debunking arguments—aims to put pressure on realism by emphasising the seeming redundancy of mathematical or moral entities when it comes to explaining our judgements. In the moral realm this challenge has been made by Gilbert Harman and Sharon Street; in the mathematical realm it is known as the 'Benacerraf-Field' problem. The second strategy—indispensability arguments—aims to provide support for realism by emphasising the seeming intellectual indispensability of mathematical or moral entities, for example when constructing good explanatory theories. This strategy is associated with Quine and Putnam in mathematics and with Nicholas Sturgeon and David Enoch in ethics. Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics addresses these issues through an explicitly comparative methodology which we call the 'companions in illumination' approach. By considering how argumentative strategies in the philosophy of mathematics might apply to the philosophy of ethics, and vice versa, the papers collected here break new ground in both areas. For good measure, two further companions for illumination are also broached: the philosophy of chance and the philosophy of religion. Collectively, these comparisons light up new questions, arguments, and problems of interest to scholars interested in realism in any area.

The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader

Intellectual and Political Controversies

Author: Sandra G. Harding

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415945011

Category: Social Science

Page: 379

View: 4263

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Leading feminist scholar and one of the founders of Standpoint Theory, Sandra Harding brings together the biggest names in the field--Dorothy Smith, Donna Haraway, Patricia Hill Collins, Nancy Hartsock and Hilary Rose--to not only showcase the most influential essays on the topic but to also highlight subsequent interrogations and developments of these approaches from a wide variety of disciplines and intellectual and political positions.

Believing Against the Evidence

Agency and the Ethics of Belief

Author: Miriam Schleifer McCormick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136682686

Category: Philosophy

Page: 144

View: 9308

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The question of whether it is ever permissible to believe on insufficient evidence has once again become a live question. Greater attention is now being paid to practical dimensions of belief, namely issues related to epistemic virtue, doxastic responsibility, and voluntarism. In this book, McCormick argues that the standards used to evaluate beliefs are not isolated from other evaluative domains. The ultimate criteria for assessing beliefs are the same as those for assessing action because beliefs and actions are both products of agency. Two important implications of this thesis, both of which deviate from the dominant view in contemporary philosophy, are 1) it can be permissible (and possible) to believe for non-evidential reasons, and 2) we have a robust control over many of our beliefs, a control sufficient to ground attributions of responsibility for belief.

The Minority Body

A Theory of Disability

Author: Elizabeth Barnes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198732589

Category:

Page: 224

View: 1837

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Elizabeth Barnes argues compellingly that disability is primarily a social phenomenon--a way of being a minority, a way of facing social oppression, but not a way of being inherently or intrinsically worse off. This is how disability is understood in the Disability Rights and Disability Pride movements; but there is a massive disconnect with the way disability is typically viewed within analytic philosophy. The idea that disability is not inherently bad or sub-optimal is one that many philosophers treat with open skepticism, and sometimes even with scorn. The goal of this book is to articulate and defend a version of the view of disability that is common in the Disability Rights movement. Elizabeth Barnes argues that to be physically disabled is not to have a defective body, but simply to have a minority body.

The Epistemology of Disagreement

New Essays

Author: David Christensen,Jennifer Lackey

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191663735

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 7994

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Epistemology of Disagreement brings together essays from a dozen philosophers on the epistemic significance of disagreement; all but one of the essays are new. Questions discussed include: When (if ever) does the disagreement of others require a rational agent to revise her beliefs? Do 'conciliatory' accounts, on which agents are required to revise significantly, suffer from fatal problems of self-defeat, given the disagreement about disagreement? What is the significance of disagreement about philosophical topics in particular? How does the epistemology of disagreement relate to broader epistemic theorizing? Does the increased significance of multiple disagreeing agents depend on their being independent of one another? John Hawthorne and Amia Srinivasan, Thomas Kelly, and Brian Weatherson all weigh in with attacks on conciliatory views or defenses of non-conciliatory approaches. David Christensen and Stewart Cohen take up the opposite side of the debate. Bryan Frances, Sanford Goldberg, and Ernest Sosa discuss a kind of disagreement that will be of particular concern to most readers of this book: disagreement about philosophy. And Robert Audi, Jonathan Kvanvig, and Jennifer Lackey tackle some general theoretical issues that bear on disagreement. The philosophers represented here include some who have contributed actively to the disagreement literature already, as well as some who are exploring the issue for the first time. Their work helps to deepen and expand our understanding of some epistemic phenomena that are central to any thoughtful believer's engagement with other believers.

Epistemic Authority

A Theory of Trust, Authority, and Autonomy in Belief

Author: Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190278269

Category:

Page: 296

View: 8016

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this book Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski gives an extended argument that the self-reflective person is committed to belief on authority. Epistemic authority is compatible with autonomy, but epistemic self-reliance is incoherent. She argues that epistemic and emotional self-trust are rational and inescapable, that consistent self-trust commits us to trust in others, and that among those we are committed to trusting are some whom we ought to treat as epistemic authorities, modeled on the well-known principles of authority of Joseph Raz. Some of these authorities can be in the moral and religious domains. Why have people for thousands of years accepted epistemic authority in religious communities? A religious community's justification for authority is typically based on beliefs unique to that community. Unfortunately, that often means that from the community's perspective, its justifying claims are insulated from the outside; whereas from an outside perspective, epistemic authority in the community appears unjustified. But as Zagzebski's argument shows, an individual's acceptance of authority in her community can be justified by principles that outsiders accept, and the particular beliefs justified by that authority are not immune to external critiques.

The Limits of Kindness

Author: Caspar Hare

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199691991

Category: Philosophy

Page: 229

View: 7310

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Caspar Hare presents a novel approach to questions of what we ought to do, and why we ought to do it. The traditional way to approach this subject is to begin by supposing a foundational principle, and then work out its implications. Consequentialists say that we ought to make the world impersonally better, for instance, while Kantian deontologists say that we ought to act on universalizable maxims. And contractualists say that we ought to act in accordance with the terms of certain hypothetical contracts. These principles are all grand and controversial. The motivating idea behind The Limits of Kindness is that we can tackle some of the most difficult problems in normative ethics by starting with a principle that is humble and uncontroversial. Being moral involves wanting particular other people to be better off. From these innocuous beginnings, Hare leads us to surprising conclusions about how we ought to resolve conflicts of interest, whether we ought to create some people rather than others, what we ought to want in an infinite world, when we ought to make sacrifices for the sake of needy strangers, and why we cannot, on pain of irrationality, attribute great importance to the boundaries between people.

Caring to Know

Comparative Care Ethics, Feminist Epistemology, and the Mahābhārata

Author: Vrinda Dalmiya

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199464760

Category: Caring

Page: 340

View: 6308

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The manuscript explores the plausibility of care-based epistemology in a comparative key. Investigating the epistemic virtue of care-giving, the work weaves together insights from care ethics, virtue epistemology and a particular reading of the Mah=abh=arata which, left to themselves, do not appear compatible with one another. Drawing on these traditions, the work goes on to provide a feminist vision of search for truth that is consistent with both ethicalrelations and interventions for justice.

Reading Ethics

Author: Miranda Fricker,Samuel Guttenplan

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 331

View: 7305

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This introductory text encourages students to engage with key problems and arguments in ethics through a series of classic and contemporary readings. It will inspire students to think about the distinctive nature of moral philosophy, and to draw comparisons between different traditions of thought, between ancient and modern philosophies, and between theoretical and literary writing about the place of value in human life. Each of the book’s six chapters focuses on a particular theme: the nature of goodness, subjectivity and objectivity in ethical thinking, justice and virtue, moral motivation, the place of moral obligation, and the idea that literature can be a form of moral philosophy. The historical readings come from Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant and Mill; and the contemporary readings from Foot, Rawls, McDowell, Mackie, Nagel, Williams, Nussbaum and Gaita. The editors’ introductions to the themes, and the interactive commentaries they provide for each reading, are intended to make Reading Ethics come as close as possible to a seminar in philosophy.