Epitome of Roman history

Author: Lucius Annaeus Florus,Edward Seymour Forster

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN: 9780674992542

Category: History

Page: 381

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Florus, born apparently in Africa, lived in Spain and in Rome in Hadrian's time. He wrote, in brief pointed rhetorical style, a summary of Roman history (especially wars) in two books in order to show the greatness and decline of Roman morals. It is based chiefly on Livy. It was perhaps planned to reach his own times, but the extant work ends with Augustus's reign (30 BCE–14 CE). This Epitome is a useful rapid sketch of Roman military history. Poetry by Florus is also available in the Loeb Classical Library, in Minor Latin Poets, Volume II.

Vegetius

Epitome of Military Science

Author: Flavius Vegetius Renatus

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9780853239109

Category: History

Page: 161

View: 3765

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"The only Latin art of war to survive, Vegetius' Epitome was for long an essential part of the medieval prince's military education. The core of his proposals, the maintenance of a highly-trained professional standing army and navy, was revolutionary for medieval Europe, while his theory of deterrence through strength remains the foundation of modern Western defence policy. This annotated translation highlights the significance for his own age of Vegetius' advice, written just before the fall of the Roman Empire in the West, at a time when economic weakness and political disintegration threatened to undermine the strategic defensive structure that had underpinned the Roman State for so long." "The main thrust of his reforms is to confront the problems of the fragmentation of the army, the barbarization of its personnel, the loss of professional skills, and the substitution of mercenaries for standing forces. The accent of the work is on the practicalities of recruiting and training new model armies (and navies) starting from scratch, and on the strategies appropriate to their use against the barbarian invaders of the period."--BOOK JACKET.

The History of Zonaras

From Alexander Severus to the Death of Theodosius the Great

Author: Thomas Banchich,Eugene Lane

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134424728

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6612

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While an exile from Constantinople, the twelfth-century Byzantine functionary and canonist John Zonaras culled earlier chronicles and histories to compose an account of events from creation to the reign of Alexius Comnenus. For topics where his sources are lost or appear elsewhere in more truncated form, his testimony and the identification of the texts on which he depends are of critical importance. For his account of the first two centuries of the Principate, Zonaras employed now-lost portions of Cassius Dio. From the point where Dio’s History ended, to the reign of Theodosius the Great (d. 395), he turned to other sources to produce a uniquely full historical narrative of the critical years 235-395, making Books XII.15-XIII.19 of the Epitome central to the study of both late Roman history and late Roman and Byzantine historiography. This key section of the Epitome, together with Zonaras’ Prologue, here appears in English for the first time, both complemented by a historical and historiographical commentary. A special feature of the latter is a first-ever English translation of a broad range of sources which illuminate Zonaras’ account and the historiographical traditions it reflects. Among the authors whose newly translated works occupy a prominent place in the commentary are George Cedrenus, George the Monk, John of Antioch, Peter the Patrician, Symeon Magister, and Theodore Scutariotes. Specialized indices facilitate the use of the translations and commentary alike. The result is an invaluable guide and stimulus to further research for scholars and students of the history and historiography of Rome and Byzantium.

Excavating Modernity

The Roman Past in Fascist Italy

Author: Joshua Arthurs

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801468833

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 5673

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The cultural and material legacies of the Roman Republic and Empire in evidence throughout Rome have made it the "Eternal City." Too often, however, this patrimony has caused Rome to be seen as static and antique, insulated from the transformations of the modern world. In Excavating Modernity, Joshua Arthurs dramatically revises this perception, arguing that as both place and idea, Rome was strongly shaped by a radical vision of modernity imposed by Mussolini's regime between the two world wars. Italian Fascism's appropriation of the Roman past-the idea of Rome, or romanità- encapsulated the Fascist virtues of discipline, hierarchy, and order; the Fascist "new man" was modeled on the Roman legionary, the epitome of the virile citizen-soldier. This vision of modernity also transcended Italy's borders, with the Roman Empire providing a foundation for Fascism's own vision of Mediterranean domination and a European New Order. At the same time, romanità also served as a vocabulary of anxiety about modernity. Fears of population decline, racial degeneration and revolution were mapped onto the barbarian invasions and the fall of Rome. Offering a critical assessment of romanità and its effects, Arthurs explores the ways in which academics, officials, and ideologues approached Rome not as a site of distant glories but as a blueprint for contemporary life, a source of dynamic values to shape the present and future.

Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus

Author: Marcus Junianus Justinus

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9781555409517

Category: Philosophy

Page: 339

View: 9253

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Justin's Epitome is a fundamental source for Carthage and is the only surviving continuous narrative for the Hellenistic period. This volume is the first English translation of Justin's history to appear in over 140 years.

Gai Salusti Crispi de Catilinae Coniuratione

Author: Sallust,Joseph Henry Allen

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 9781378362037

Category: History

Page: 116

View: 7856

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Nero

Author: Edward Champlin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674029361

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 360

View: 6585

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The Roman emperor Nero is remembered by history as the vain and immoral monster who fiddled while Rome burned. Edward Champlin reinterprets Nero's enormities on their own terms, as the self-conscious performances of an imperial actor with a formidable grasp of Roman history and mythology and a canny sense of his audience. Nero murdered his younger brother and rival to the throne, probably at his mother's prompting. He then murdered his mother, with whom he may have slept. He killed his pregnant wife in a fit of rage, then castrated and married a young freedman because he resembled her. He mounted the public stage to act a hero driven mad or a woman giving birth, and raced a ten-horse chariot in the Olympic games. He probably instigated the burning of Rome, for which he then ordered the spectacular punishment of Christians, many of whom were burned as human torches to light up his gardens at night. Without seeking to rehabilitate the historical monster, Champlin renders Nero more vividly intelligible by illuminating the motives behind his theatrical gestures, and revealing the artist who thought of himself as a heroic figure. "Nero" is a brilliant reconception of a historical account that extends back to Tacitus, Suetonius, and Cassius Dio. The effortless style and artful construction of the book will engage any reader drawn to its intrinsically fascinating subject.

The Critical Essays: On literary composition ; Dinarchus ; First letter to Ammaeus ; Letter to Gnaeus Pompeius ; Second letter to Ammaeus

Author: Dionysius (of Halicarnassus.),Stephen Usher

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN: 9780674995130

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 440

View: 6179

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Dionysius of Halicarnassus had migrated to Rome by 30 BCE, where he lived until his death some time after 8 BCE, writing his Roman Antiquities and teaching the art of rhetoric and literary composition. Dionysius's purpose, both in his own work and in his teaching, was to re-establish the classical Attic standards of purity, invention and taste in order to reassert the primacy of Greek as the literary language of the Mediterranean world. He advocated the minute study of the styles of the finest prose authors of the fifth and fourth century BCE, especially the Attic orators. His critical essays on these and on the historian Thucydides represent an important development from the somewhat mechanical techniques of rhetorical handbooks to a more sensitive criticism of individual authors. Illustrating his analysis with well-chosen examples, Dionysius preserves a number of important fragments of Lysias and Isaeus. The essays on those two orators and on Isocrates, Demosthenes and Thucydides comprise Volume I of this edition. Volume II contains three letters to his students; a short essay on the orator Dinarchus; and his finest work, the essay On Literary Composition, which combines rhetoric, grammar and criticism in a manner unique in ancient literature. The Loeb Classical Library also publishes a seven volume edition of Roman Antiquities, by Dionysius of Halicarnassus, a history from earliest times to 264 BCE.

The Attic nights of Aulus Gellius

Author: Aulus Gellius

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 463

View: 8163

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Aulus Gellius (ca. 123–170 CE) is known almost wholly from his Noctes Atticae, 'Attic Nights', so called because it was begun during the nights of an Attic winter. The work collects in twenty books (of Book VIII only the index is extant) interesting notes covering philosophy, history, biography, all sorts of antiquities, points of law, literary criticism, and lexicographic matters, explanations of old words and questions of grammar. The work is valuable because of its many excerpts from other authors whose works are lost; and because of its evidence for people's manners and occupations. Some at least of the dramatic settings may be genuine occasions. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Attic Nights is in three volumes.

Justin: Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus: Volume II: Books 13-15

The Successors to Alexander the Great

Author: Marcus Junianus Justinus,J. C. Yardley,Pat Wheatley,Waldemar Heckel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199277591

Category: History

Page: 343

View: 7393

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Pompeius Trogus, a Romanized Gaul living in the age of Augustus, wrote a forty-four book universal history (The Philippic History) of the non-Roman Mediterranean world. This work was later abbreviated by M. Junianus Justinus. Alexander the Great's life has been examined in minute detail by scholars for many decades, but the period of chaos that ensued after his death in 323 BC has received much less attention. Few historical sources recount the history of this period consecutively. Justin's abbreviated epitome of the lost Philippic history of Pompeius Trogus is the only relatively continuous account we have left of the events that transpired in the 40 years from 323 BC. This volume supplies a historical analysis of this unique source for the difficult period of Alexander's Successors up to 297 BC, a full translation, and running commentary on Books 13-15.