Global Diasporas

An Introduction

Author: Robin Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134077947

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 9506

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In a perceptive and arresting analysis, Robin Cohen introduces his distinctive approach to the study of the world’s diasporas. This book investigates the changing meanings of the concept and the contemporary diasporic condition, including case studies of Jewish, Armenian, African, Chinese, British, Indian, Lebanese and Caribbean people. The first edition of this book had a major impact on diaspora studies and was the foundational text in an emerging research and teaching field. This second edition extends and clarifies Robin Cohen’s argument, addresses some critiques and outlines new perspectives for the study of diasporas. It has also been made more student-friendly with illustrations, guided readings and suggested essay questions.

Global Diasporas

An Introduction

Author: Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick and Currently Dean of Humanities Robin Cohen,Robin Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134077955

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 5872

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In a perceptive and arresting analysis, Robin Cohen introduces his distinctive approach to the study of the world’s diasporas. This book investigates the changing meanings of the concept and the contemporary diasporic condition, including case studies of Jewish, Armenian, African, Chinese, British, Indian, Lebanese and Caribbean people. The first edition of this book had a major impact on diaspora studies and was the foundational text in an emerging research and teaching field. This second edition extends and clarifies Robin Cohen’s argument, addresses some critiques and outlines new perspectives for the study of diasporas. It has also been made more student-friendly with illustrations, guided readings and suggested essay questions.

Global Diasporas

An Introduction

Author: Robin Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135368988

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 8651

DOWNLOAD NOW »
First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Diaspora: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Kevin Kenny

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199858608

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 9368

DOWNLOAD NOW »
What does diaspora mean? Until quite recently, the word had a specific and restricted meaning, referring principally to the dispersal and exile of the Jews. But since the 1960s, the term diaspora has proliferated to a remarkable extent, to the point where it is now applied to migrants of almost every kind. This Very Short Introduction explains where the concept of diaspora came from, how its meaning changed over time, why its usage has expanded so dramatically in recent years, and how it can both clarify and distort the nature of migration. Kevin Kenny highlights the strength of diaspora as a mode of explanation, focusing on three key elements--movement, connectivity, and return--and illustrating his argument with examples drawn from Jewish, Armenian, African, Irish, and Asian diasporas. He shows that diaspora is not simply a synonym for the movement of people. Its explanatory power is greatest when people believe that their departure was forced rather than voluntary. Thus diaspora would not really explain most of the Irish migration to America, but it does shed light on the migration compelled by the Great Famine. Kenny also describes how migrants and their descendants develop diasporic cultures abroad--regardless of the form their migration takes--based on their connections with a homeland, real or imagined, and with people of common origin in other parts of the world. Finally, most conceptions of diaspora feature the dream of a return to a homeland, even when this yearning does not involve an actual physical relocation. About the Series: Oxford's Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects--from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative--yet always balanced and complete--discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable.

The Politics of Migration

Author: Robin Cohen,Zig Layton-Henry

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 341

View: 1225

DOWNLOAD NOW »
'The politics of migration is an understated dimension of international migration but, perhaps, over the long haul the most important. Immigration affects politics in multiple ways: it introduces potential new actors into a political system, links at least two different polities, and can have an important effect on political institutions and forces on the homeland and the receiving country. Study of the politics of migration was rare until the 1990s. the volume does a good job of bringing together key pieces from the 1970s and 1980s.' - Mark J. Miller, Journal of World History 'There is a clear western focus, with case studies on Britain, the USA and western European countries. . . the selection does include some true classics and is representative of the field . . . the collection could offer much to the student with an enquiring mind.' - Patricia Hogwood, Political Studies the Politics of Migration is an authoritative collection which includes the most important articles and papers that document and analyse the political impact and consequences of migration since World War II. It assesses the impact of migration on class conflict and politics in the host country and the strategies adopted by the state to manage the political activities and demands of new ethnic minority communities. It also covers the rise of racist politics, especially electoral support for anti-immigrant far right parties. Special emphasis is placed on the politics of citizenship and political engagement as the new settlers adopt political strategies in order to combat exclusion, racism and oppression and to achieve recognition and legitimacy.

Diasporas

Author: Stéphane Dufoix

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520253590

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 475

DOWNLOAD NOW »
"Stéphane Dufoix has written the most exhaustive, critical, and analytically sophisticated introduction to diasporas. It resists overemphasizing the transformative power of the present era of globalization and puts the formation of diasporas in a perspective of longue durée that includes previous periods of global integration and diasporic dispersion. Similarly, he avoids the 'beyond the nation-state' trend in the transnationalism literature and shows convincingly that diasporas are intimately linked, in various and contradictory ways, to the politics of the contemporary nation-state."--Andreas Wimmer, University of California ,Los Angeles "A work of exemplary range, clarity, and erudition, providing both an introduction and a deft critical reformulation. Diaspora, for Dufoix, is both a complex history and a cluster of proliferating discourses and practices whose future is undetermined. A lucid introduction and an original contribution to scholarship." --James Clifford, University of California, Santa Cruz "By carefully tracing its origins and development, Stéphane Dufoix has produced an elegant and richly rewarding guide to the concept of 'diaspora.' The word can be used both too narrowly (confining the idea to the Jewish case) and too broadly (allowing virtually all minorities to qualify). We need a sure-footed guide to the complexities and ambiguities of 'diaspora' and we have found one in Stéphane Dufoix. I warmly recommend this instructive book."--Robin Cohen, University of Oxford, and author of Global Diasporas "Stéphane Dufoix has given us a brilliant exploration of the many meanings and boundaries of the term 'diaspora'. Its far longer and diverse history than is commonly thought will come as a surprise to some. Dufoix's theoretical and analytical engagement with the term, and the erudition he brings to it, are an invitation to a whole new debate."--Saskia Sassen, author of Territory, Authority, Rights: From Medieval to Global Assemblages "In Diasporas Stéphane Dufoix gives us an excellent introduction to and overview of a fascinating and very complex topic. Considering this phenomenon from a variety of perspectives, including etymological, historical, and cultural, he shows how different populations and groups of scholars have used the idea of diaspora to conceptualize their own identities, and the strengths and weaknesses of using the concept of diaspora to do so. Dufoix's discussion of space and contemporary virtual communities is particularly fascinating. This is a very welcome addition to an ever-growing literature."--Tyler Stovall, University of California, Berkeley

New African Diasporas

Author: Khalid Koser

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113439196X

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 2549

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The extensive literature relating to the African diaspora has tended to concentrate on the descendants of those who left Africa as part of the slave trade to North America. This important new book gathers together work on more recent waves of African migration from some of the most exciting thinkers on the contemporary diaspora. Concentrating particularly on the last 20 years, the contributions look to the United States and beyond to diaspora settlement in the UK and Northern Europe. New African Diasporas looks at a range of different types of diaspora - legal and illegal, professional and low-skilled, asylum seekers and 'economic migrants' - and includes chapters on diasporic communities originating in Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ghana, Senegal and Somalia. It also examines often neglected differences based on gender, class and generation in the process. This book will be essential reading for anyone with an interest in the African diaspora and provides the most wide-ranging picture of the new African diaspora yet.

Global Diasporas

An Introduction

Author: Robin Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135368996

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 7471

DOWNLOAD NOW »
First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Literature of the Indian Diaspora

Theorizing the Diasporic Imaginary

Author: Vijay Mishra

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134096925

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 8520

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Literature of the Indian Diaspora constitutes a major study of the literature and other cultural texts of the Indian diaspora. It is also an important contribution to diaspora theory in general. Examining both the ‘old’ Indian diaspora of early capitalism, following the abolition of slavery, and the ‘new’ diaspora linked to movements of late capital, Mishra argues that a full understanding of the Indian diaspora can only be achieved if attention is paid to the particular locations of both the ‘old’ and the ‘new’ in nation states. Applying a theoretical framework based on trauma, mourning/impossible mourning, spectres, identity, travel, translation, and recognition, Mishra uses the term ‘imaginary’ to refer to any ethnic enclave in a nation-state that defines itself, consciously or unconsciously, as a group in displacement. He examines the works of key writers, many now based across the globe in Canada, Australia, America and the UK, – V.S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, M.G. Vassanji, Shani Mootoo, Bharati Mukherjee, David Dabydeen, Rohinton Mistry and Hanif Kureishi, among them – to show how they exemplify both the diasporic imaginary and the respective traumas of the ‘old’ and ‘new’ Indian diasporas.

Diaspora

An Introduction

Author: Jana Evans Braziel

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781405153409

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 3867

DOWNLOAD NOW »
This introduction highlights key topics significant to contemporary discussions of diaspora and stressing the substantial impact these migratory shifts have on global capital. Offers a critical introduction to diaspora - the study of dispersed ethnic populations - with specific focus on migratory shifts post-1989 and post 9/11 Examines the ways global capitalist shifts and the global terrorism war impact diaspora movements since the mid-1990s Includes discussion of globalization, the global terror war, and post-9/11 geopolitical and geo-economic shifts Engages directly with the political and ideological formations of the contemporary diaspora movement Provides comprehensive analysis of labour and economic migration; the relationship of diaspora to gender and race; queer diasporas; and diasporic 'acts of resistance' Theorizing Diaspora (2003), Braziel's groundbreaking anthology, offers complementary readings for this text

Routledge Handbook of Diaspora Studies

Author: Robin Cohen,Carolin Fischer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351805495

Category: Social Science

Page: 364

View: 4518

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The word ‘diaspora’ has leapt from its previously confined use – mainly concerned with the dispersion of Jews, Greeks, Armenians and Africans away from their natal homelands – to cover the cases of many other ethnic groups, nationalities and religions. But this ‘horizontal’ scattering of the word to cover the mobility of many groups to many destinations, has been paralleled also by ‘vertical’ leaps, with the word diaspora being deployed to cover more and more phenomena and serve more and more objectives of different actors. With sections on ‘debating the concept’, ‘complexity’, ‘home and home-making’, ‘connections’ and ‘critiques’, the Routledge Handbook of Diaspora Studies is likely to remain an authoritative reference for some time. Each contribution includes a targeted list of references for further reading. The editors have carefully blended established scholars of diaspora with younger scholars looking at how diasporas are constructed ‘from below’. The adoption of a variety of conceptual perspectives allows for generalization, contrasts and comparisons between cases. In this exciting and authoritative collection over 40 scholars from many countries have explored the evolving use of the concept of diaspora, its possibilities as well as its limitations. This Handbook will be indispensable for students undertaking essays, debates and dissertations in the field.

The Ukrainian Diaspora

Author: Vic Satzewich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134434952

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2806

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this fascinating book, Vic Satzewich traces one hundred and twenty-five years of Ukranian migration, from the economic migration at the end of the nineteenth century to the political migration during the inter-war period and throughout the 1960s and 1980s resulting from the troubled relationship between Russia and the Ukraine. The author looks at the ways the Ukranian Diaspora has retained its identity, at the different factions within it and its response to the war crimes trials of the 1980s.

Diaspora’s Homeland

Author: Shelly Chan

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822372037

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 369

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In Diaspora’s Homeland Shelly Chan provides a broad historical study of how the mass migration of more than twenty million Chinese overseas influenced China’s politics, economics, and culture. Chan develops the concept of “diaspora moments”—a series of recurring disjunctions in which migrant temporalities come into tension with local, national, and global ones—to map the multiple historical geographies in which the Chinese homeland and diaspora emerge. Chan describes several distinct moments, including the lifting of the Qing emigration ban in 1893, intellectual debates in the 1920s and 1930s about whether Chinese emigration constituted colonization and whether Confucianism should be the basis for a modern Chinese identity, as well as the intersection of gender, returns, and Communist campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s. Adopting a transnational frame, Chan narrates Chinese history through a reconceptualization of diaspora to show how mass migration helped establish China as a nation-state within a global system.

Family Life in an Age of Migration and Mobility

Global Perspectives through the Life Course

Author: Majella Kilkey,Ewa Palenga-Möllenbeck

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113752099X

Category: Social Science

Page: 358

View: 5871

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In an age of migration and mobility many aspects of contemporary family life – from biological reproduction to marriage, from child-rearing to care of the elderly - take place against a backdrop of intensified movement across a range of spatial scales from the global to the local. This insightful book analyzes the opportunities and challenges this poses for families and for academic, empirical and policy understandings of ‘the family’ on a global level, including case studies from Europe, India, the Philippines, South Korea, the United States and Australia. With chapters on international reproductive tourism, transnational parenting, ‘mail-order brides’ and ‘sunset migration’, it examines the implications of migration and mobility for families at different stages of the life course. Moreover, it brings together leading international scholars to connect a fragmented field of research, and in so doing enables an interdisciplinary exchange, generating new insights for theory, policy and empirical analysis.

New Diasporas

Author: Nicholas Van Hear

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1857288386

Category: Social Science

Page: 298

View: 2162

DOWNLOAD NOW »
First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Yoruba in Diaspora

An African Church in London

Author: H. Harris

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230601049

Category: Science

Page: 294

View: 9845

DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Nigerian diaspora is now world-wide, and when Yoruba travel, they take with them their religious organizations. As a member of the Cherubim and Seraphim church in London for over thirty years, anthropologist Hermione Harris explores a world of prayer, spirit possession, and divination through dreams and visions.

Theorizing Diaspora

A Reader

Author: Jana Evans Braziel,Anita Mannur

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631233916

Category: Social Science

Page: 356

View: 378

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Bringing together the key essays that have constituted this field since its inception and that point the way toward its future, Theorizing Diaspora is a central resource for understanding diaspora as an emergent and contested theoretical space. Anthologizes the most influential and critically received essays that have shaped the trajectory of diaspora studies. Offers classic statements that have defined the field by scholars including Appadurai, Gilroy, Radhakrishnan, and Hall. Presents divergent strains of multiple diasporas, including Chinese, Black African, Jewish, South Asian, Latin American, and Caribbean. Reflects the modalities and methodologies of scholars across the humanities and social sciences. Includes a postscript on diaspora in cyberspace and an extensive bibliography.

Diasporas

Concepts, Intersections, Identities

Author: Professor Kim Knott,Doctor Sean McLoughlin

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 1848138717

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 883

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Featuring essays by world-renowned scholars, Diasporas charts the various ways in which global population movements and associated social, political and cultural issues have been seen through the lens of diaspora. Wide-ranging and interdisciplinary, this collection considers critical concepts shaping the field, such as migration, ethnicity, post-colonialism and cosmopolitanism. It also examines key intersecting agendas and themes, including political economy, security, race, gender, and material and electronic culture. Original case studies of contemporary as well as classical diasporas are featured, mapping new directions in research and testing the usefulness of diaspora for analyzing the complexity of transnational lives today. Diasporas is an essential text for anyone studying, working or interested in this increasingly vital subject.

The Israeli Diaspora

Author: Steven J. Gold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135433879

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 9925

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this fascinating study, based on extensive field work in the major Israeli communities of New York, Los Angeles, London, Paris and Sydney, Steven J. Gold looks at their reasons for leaving - existing links abroad, political and economic dissatisfaction at home and, in the case of the Sephardim or Israelis of non-European origin, often a feeling of being treated as second-class citizens - the tensions, compromises and satisfactions involved in their relations with Israelis who have not left and with the Jewish and non-Jewish communities in the countries in which they settle. In a final chapter, he talks to those who, after years as emigrants, have made the decision to return. The end result is a major contribution to the study not just of the Israeli diaspora but also to our wider understanding of migration and transnational identity. Winner of the 2003 Thomas and Znaniecki Award (American Sociological Association International Migration Section)

Becoming Black

Author: Michelle M. Wright

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822385864

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 9151

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Becoming Black is a powerful theorization of Black subjectivity throughout the African diaspora. In this unique comparative study, Michelle M. Wright discusses the commonalties and differences in how Black writers and thinkers from the United States, the Caribbean, Africa, France, Great Britain, and Germany have responded to white European and American claims about Black consciousness. As Wright traces more than a century of debate on Black subjectivity between intellectuals of African descent and white philosophers, she also highlights how feminist writers have challenged patriarchal theories of Black identity. Wright argues that three nineteenth-century American and European works addressing race—Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, G. W. F. Hegel’s Philosophy of History, and Count Arthur de Gobineau’s Essay on the Inequality of the Human Races—were particularly influential in shaping twentieth-century ideas about Black subjectivity. She considers these treatises in depth and describes how the revolutionary Black thinkers W. E. B. Du Bois, Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor, and Frantz Fanon countered the theories they promulgated. She explains that while Du Bois, Césaire, Senghor, and Fanon rejected the racist ideologies of Jefferson, Hegel, and Gobineau, for the most part they did so within what remained a nationalist, patriarchal framework. Such persistent nationalist and sexist ideologies were later subverted, Wright shows, in the work of Black women writers including Carolyn Rodgers and Audre Lorde and, more recently, the British novelists Joan Riley, Naomi King, Jo Hodges, and Andrea Levy. By considering diasporic writing ranging from Du Bois to Lorde to the contemporary African novelists Simon Njami and Daniel Biyaoula, Wright reveals Black subjectivity as rich, varied, and always evolving.