Heaven's Ditch

God, Gold, and Murder on the Erie Canal

Author: Jack Kelly

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466878991

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9641

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The technological marvel of its age, the Erie Canal grew out of a sudden fit of inspiration. Proponents didn't just dream; they built a 360-mile waterway entirely by hand and largely through wilderness. As excitement crackled down its length, the canal became the scene of the most striking outburst of imagination in American history. Zealots invented new religions and new modes of living. The Erie Canal made New York the financial capital of America and brought the modern world crashing into the frontier. Men and women saw God face to face, gained and lost fortunes, and reveled in a period of intense spiritual creativity. Heaven's Ditch by Jack Kelly illuminates the spiritual and political upheavals along this "psychic highway" from its opening in 1825 through 1844. "Wage slave" Sam Patch became America's first celebrity daredevil. William Miller envisioned the apocalypse. Farm boy Joseph Smith gave birth to Mormonism, a new and distinctly American religion. Along the way, the reader encounters America's very first "crime of the century," a treasure hunt, searing acts of violence, a visionary cross-dresser, and a panoply of fanatics, mystics, and hoaxers. A page-turning narrative, Heaven's Ditch offers an excitingly fresh look at a heady, foundational moment in American history.

Erie Canal Legacy

Architectural Treasures of the Empire State

Author: Richard O. Reisem,Andy Olenick

Publisher: Landmark Soc. of Western New York

ISBN: 9780964170667

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 9492

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Describes the architecture along the Erie Canal villages.

Erie Canal

Author: Andrew P. Kitzmann,Erie Canal Museum

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 143962142X

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 2060

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The Erie Canal was completed in 1825 and became the backbone of an economic and cultural explosion that defined the image of New York. The canals development spurred successful industry and a booming economy, sparking massive urban growth in an area that was previously virtually unexplored wilderness. People poured west into this new space, drawn by the ability to ship goods along the canal to the Hudson River, New York City, and the world beyond. Erie Canal is a compilation of 200 vintage images from the Erie Canal Museums documentary collection of New Yorks canal system. Vintage postcards depict life and industry along the canal, including not only the Erie itself but also the lateral and feeder canals that completed the state-wide system.

Bond of Union

Building the Erie Canal and the American Empire

Author: Gerard Koeppel

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0786745444

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 9649

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In this elegantly written and far-reaching narrative, acclaimed author Gerard Koeppel tells the astonishing story of the creation of the Erie Canal and the memorable characters who turned a visionary plan into a successful venture. Koeppel's long years of research fill the pages with new findings about the construction of the canal and its enormous impact, providing a unique perspective on America's self perception as an empire destined to expand to the Pacific.

Explorer's Guide The Erie Canal

Includes Oswego, Cayuga-Seneca & Champlain Canals: A Great Destination

Author: Deborah Williams

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN: 1581570805

Category: Travel

Page: 320

View: 4708

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Offers information on Erie Canal's history, accomodations, attractions, restaurants, and shopping.

A Nation of Deadbeats

An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters

Author: Scott Reynolds Nelson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307474321

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 330

View: 2473

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" The story of America is a story of dreamers and defaulters. It is also a story of dramatic financial panics that defined the nation, created its political parties, and forced tens of thousands to escape their creditors to new towns in Texas, Florida, and California. As far back as 1792, these panics boiled down to one simple question- Would Americans pay their debts—or were we just a nation of deadbeats? From the merchant William Duer’s attempts to speculate on post–Revolutionary War debt, to an ill-conceived 1815 plan to sell English coats to Americans on credit, to the debt-fueled railroad expansion that precipitated the Panic of 1857, Scott Reynolds Nelson offers a crash course in America’s worst financial disasters—and a concise explanation of the first principles that caused them all. Nelson shows how consumer debt, both at the highest levels of finance and in the everyday lives of citizens, has time and again left us unable to make good.The problem always starts withthe chain of banks, brokers, moneylenders, and insurance companies that separate borrowers and lenders. &

Wedding of the Waters: The Erie Canal and the Making of a Great Nation

Author: Peter L. Bernstein

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393340201

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 7686

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"One corner of the great American panorama enlarged to highlight starry-eyed visionaries, political machinations, indefatigable ingenuity, and cockeyed optimism."—Kirkus Reviews The building of the Erie Canal, like the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Panama Canal, is one of the greatest and most riveting stories of American ingenuity. Best-selling author Peter Bernstein presents the story of the canal's construction against the larger tableau of America in the first quarter-century of the 1800s. Examining the social, political, and economic ramifications of this mammoth project, Bernstein demonstrates how the canal's creation helped prevent the dismemberment of the American empire and knit the sinews of the American industrial revolution. Featuring a rich cast of characters, including not only political visionaries like Washington, Jefferson, van Buren, and the architect's most powerful champion, Governor DeWitt Clinton, but also a huge platoon of Irish diggers as well as the canal's first travelers, Wedding of the Waters reveals that the twenty-first-century themes of urbanization, economic growth, and globalization can all be traced to the first great macroengineering venture of American history.

The Year of Fear

Machine Gun Kelly and the Manhunt That Changed the Nation

Author: Joe Urschel

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1250020808

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 308

View: 4834

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It's 1933 and Prohibition has given rise to the American gangster--now infamous names like Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger. Bank robberies at gunpoint are commonplace and kidnapping for ransom is the scourge of a lawless nation. With local cops unauthorized to cross state lines in pursuit and no national police force, safety for kidnappers is just a short trip on back roads they know well from their bootlegging days. Gangster George "Machine Gun" Kelly and his wife, Kathryn, are some of the most celebrated criminals of the Great Depression. With gin-running operations facing extinction and bank vaults with dwindling stores of cash, Kelly sets his sights on the easy-money racket of kidnapping. His target: rich oilman, Charles Urschel. Enter J. Edgar Hoover, a desperate Justice Department bureaucrat who badly needs a successful prosecution to impress the new administration and save his job. Hoover's agents are given the sole authority to chase kidnappers across state lines and when Kelly bungles the snatch job, Hoover senses his big opportunity. What follows is a thrilling 20,000 mile chase over the back roads of Depression-era America, crossing 16 state lines, and generating headlines across America along the way--a historical mystery/thriller for the ages. Joe Urschel's The Year of Fear is a thrilling true crime story of gangsters and lawmen and how an obscure federal bureaucrat used this now legendary kidnapping case to launch the FBI.

The Apparitionists

A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln's Ghost

Author: Peter Manseau

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544745981

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9518

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In the early days of photography, in the death-strewn wake of the Civil War, one man seized America’s imagination. A “spirit photographer,” William Mumler, took portrait photographs that featured the ghostly presence of lost loved ones alongside his living subjects. At a time when artists like Mathew Brady were remaking American culture with their cameras, Mumler was a sensation: the affluent and influential came calling, including Mary Todd Lincoln. It took a circuslike trial of Mumler on fraud charges, starring P. T. Barnum for the prosecution, to expose a fault line of doubt and manipulation. And even then, the judge’s stunning verdict suggested no one would ever solve the mystery of how Mumler did it. This forgotten puzzle offers a vivid snapshot of America at a crossroads in its history, a nation in thrall to new technology while grasping desperately for something to believe in.

The Book of Spice: From Anise to Zedoary

Author: John O'Connell

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681771926

Category: Cooking

Page: 248

View: 2044

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At once familiar and exotic, spices are rare things, comforting us in favorite dishes while evoking far-flung countries, Arabian souks, colonial conquests and vast fortunes. John O'Connell introduces us to spices and their unique properties, both medical and magical, alongside the fascinating histories behind both kitchen staples and esoteric luxuries. A tasty compendium of spices and a fascinating history and wide array of uses of the world’s favorite flavors—The Book of Spice: From Anise to Zedoary reveals the amazing history of spices both familiar and esoteric. John O’Connell’s erudite chapters combine history with insights into art, religion, medicine, science, and is richly seasoned with anecdotes and recipes. Discover why Cleopatra bathed in saffron and mare’s milk, why wormwood-laced absinthe caused eighteenth century drinkers to hallucinate and how cloves harvested in remote Indonesian islands found their way into a kitchen in ancient Syria. Almost every kitchen contains a bottle of cloves or a stick of cinnamon, almost every dish a pinch of something, whether chili or cumin. The Book of Spice is culinary history at its most appetizing.

We Are Women

Celebrating Our Wit and Grit

Author: June Cotner,Barb Mayer

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

ISBN: 1449479030

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 80

View: 8626

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Vintage photographs illustrate both inspirational quotes and original lighthearted musings written exclusively by women for women in this brand-new anthology full of wisdom and humor. The images are remarkable, embodying the best of the human spirit. Each paired quote reminds us of women's strength and character through time. One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.—Simone de Beauvoir

Revolution on the Hudson: New York City and the Hudson River Valley in the American War of Independence

Author: George C. Daughan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 039324573X

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 9635

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The untold story of the fight for the Hudson River Valley, control of which, both the Americans and the British firmly believed, would determine the outcome of the Revolutionary War. No part of the country was more contested during the American Revolution than New York City, the Hudson River, and the surrounding counties. Political and military leaders on both sides viewed the Hudson River Valley as the American jugular, which, if cut, would quickly bleed the rebellion to death. So in 1776, King George III sent the largest amphibious force ever assembled to seize Manhattan and use it as a base from which to push up the Hudson River Valley for a grand rendezvous at Albany with an impressive army driving down from Canada. George Washington and every other patriot leader shared the king’s fixation with the Hudson. Generations of American and British historians have held the same view. In fact, one of the few things that scholars have agreed upon is that the British strategy, though disastrously executed, should have been swift and effective. Until now, no one has argued that this plan of action was lunacy from the beginning. Revolution on the Hudson makes the bold new argument that Britain’s attempt to cut off New England never would have worked, and that doggedly pursuing dominance of the Hudson ultimately cost the crown her colonies. It unpacks intricate military maneuvers on land and sea, introduces the personalities presiding over each side’s strategy, and reinterprets the vagaries of colonial politics to offer a thrilling response to one of our most vexing historical questions: How could a fledgling nation have defeated the most powerful war machine of the era? George C. Daughan—winner of the prestigious Samuel Eliot Morrison Award for Naval Literature—integrates the war’s naval elements with its political, military, economic, and social dimensions to create a major new study of the American Revolution. Revolution on the Hudson offers a much clearer understanding of our founding conflict, and how it transformed a rebellion that Britain should have crushed into a war they could never win.

The Spirit of New York

Defining Events in the Empire State's History

Author: Bruce W. Dearstyne

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 143845659X

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7910

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Presents New York history in a fresh way through sixteen dramatic events. In this lively and engaging book, Bruce W. Dearstyne presents New York State history by exploring sixteen dramatic events. From the launch of the state government in April 1777 to the tragedy of September 11, 2001, these events altered the course of state and US history. Chapters describe great political changes, historical turning points, and struggles for social, racial, and environmental reform. The book includes daring acts of courage and against-the-odds stories of struggle and triumph. Dearstyne puts the fascinating people who made history at the center of the story, including John Jay, the lead writer of the first state constitution; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the irrepressible crusader for women’s rights; Glenn Curtiss, New York’s aviation pioneer; and Robert Moses, controversial president of the 1964 New York World’s Fair. This book makes history come alive. The momentous events illustrate the “spirit” of New York—the elusive traits that make New York State unique and a leader among the fifty states—and the complexity of its history. “Bruce Dearstyne’s beautifully written and thoroughly researched biography of New York opens new vistas for understanding the enormous impact the state has had on American history writ large. With attention to and sensitivity toward geographical, ethnic, economic, and ecological diversity, the book offers an important new explanation of why New York has been able to meet so many of its challenges with dynamism and creativity. It also shows how ego and self-interest have sometimes gotten in the way, balancing the determined problem solving that is often seen as a hallmark of the state with a true account of rises and falls, booms and busts, and vision and drift that are equally a part of its spirit.” — Louise Mirrer, President and CEO, New-York Historical Society “Bruce Dearstyne brings a fine narrative style and superb storytelling to The Spirit of New York. Readers will learn about New York politics, the state’s role in racial conflict, recasting the role of women in New York, and far more. The book is about the people of New York responding individually and collectively to the opportunities, problems, and tragedies that have punctuated the history of the Empire State from its beginnings to the present.” — Warren Roberts, author of A Place in History: Albany in the Age of Revolution, 1775–1825 “This book offers a fascinating odyssey through New York’s past by using examples of its national leadership, ranging from the state’s early women’s rights movements to Jackie Robinson’s historic integration of major league baseball, and from aviation pioneer Glenn Curtis to the construction of a landmark superhighway, the New York State Thruway. Dearstyne presents fresh insight into several salient events that made New York the Empire State. In doing so, he comes as close to a recent general history of the state as currently exists.” — F. Daniel Larkin, State University of New York at Oneonta

A Maverick Life

The Jack Kelly Story

Author: Linda Alexander

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781593936785

Category: Maverick (Television program)

Page: 374

View: 1204

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Linda J. Alexander's exhaustive research has produced an unforgettable biography of Jack Kelly, the 1950s movie and television star. In real life, Jack was a child performer, the son of New York model Nan Kelly, brother of actress Nancy Kelly, and the brother-in-law of actor Edmond O'Brien and cinematographer Fred Jackman Jr. He was also a child star in the late 1930s. He appeared in A Crooked Road with Mickey Rooney (1954), To Hell and Back (1955) with Audie Murphy, and the Science Fiction classic The Forbidden Planet (1956) with Leslie Nielsen. Jack is perhaps best known today in his role as James Garner's brother on the classic American television Western series, Maverick (1957-1962). In the late 1960s and 1970s, he continued to appear on American television as the game show host of Sale of the Century, and he also starred in movies, such as Get Christie Love (1975), and again on television in the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew series, among many others. Jack was more than a Hollywood cinema star. He also served as a city councilman and two-term Mayor of Huntington Beach, California, in addition to his work as a newspaper publisher. He loved some of the most beautiful women in Hollywood, became a husband, and would probably tell everyone that his greatest joy was in being a father. This biography draws from exhaustive research and numerous interviews with Jack's family, friends, and co-stars. The book includes a treasure trove of professional and personal family photographs.

Overcoming Niagara

Canals, Commerce, and Tourism in the Niagara-Great Lakes Borderland Region, 1792–1837

Author: Janet Dorothy Larkin

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438468253

Category:

Page: 300

View: 3522

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Analyzes the nineteenth-century canal age in the Niagara–Great Lakes borderland region as a transnational phenomenon. In Overcoming Niagara Janet Dorothy Larkin analyzes the canal age from the perspective of the Niagara–Great Lakes borderland between 1792 and 1837. She shows what drove the transportation revolution, not the conventional story of westward expansion and the international/metropolitan rivalry between Great Britain and the United States, but a dynamic connection, cooperation, and healthy competition in a transnational-borderland region. Larkin focuses on North America’s three most vital waterways—the Erie, Oswego, and Welland Canals. Canadian and American transportation leaders and promoters mutually sought to overcome the natural and artificial barriers presented by Niagara Falls by building an integrated, interconnected canal system, thus strengthening the borderland economy and propelling westward expansion, market development, and the Niagara tourist industry. On the heels of the Erie Canal’s bicentennial in 2017, Overcoming Niagaraexplores the transnational nature of the canal age within the Niagara–Great Lakes borderland, and its impact on the commercial and cultural landscape of this porous region.

Spirits and Cocktails of Upstate New York

A History

Author: Donald Cazentre

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439663157

Category: Photography

Page: 176

View: 5527

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From the Hudson Valley to the Niagara River, Upstate New York has a long and grand history of spirits and cocktails. Early colonists distilled rum, and pioneering settlers made whiskey. In the 1800s, a fanciful story of a tavern keeper and a "cock's tail" took root along the Niagara River, and the earliest definition of the "cocktail" appeared in a Hudson Valley paper. The area is home to its share of spirited times and liquid legends, and the recent surge in modern distilleries and cocktail bars only bolsters that tradition. Author Don Cazentre serves up these tales of Upstate New York along with more than fifty historic and modern cocktail recipes.

The Brigade

An Epic Story of Vengeance, Salvation, and WWII

Author: Howard Blum,Hardscrabble Entertainment, Inc.

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061980846

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 9358

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November 1944. The British government finally agrees to send a brigade of 5,000 Jewish volunteers from Palestine to Europe to fight the German army. But when the war ends and the soldiers witness firsthand the horrors their people have suffered in the concentration camps, the men launch a brutal and calculating campaign of vengeance, forming secret squads to identify, locate, and kill Nazi officers in hiding. Their own ferocity threatens to overwhelm them until a fortuitous encounter with an orphaned girl sets the men on a course of action—rescuing Jewish war orphans and transporting them to Palestine—that will not only change their lives but also help create a nation and forever alter the course of world history.

The Oatman Massacre

A Tale of Desert Captivity and Survival

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806180242

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8423

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The Oatman massacre is among the most famous and dramatic captivity stories in the history of the Southwest. In this riveting account, Brian McGinty explores the background, development, and aftermath of the tragedy. Roys Oatman, a dissident Mormon, led his family of nine and a few other families from their homes in Illinois on a journey west, believing a prophecy that they would find the fertile “Land of Bashan” at the confluence of the Gila and Colorado Rivers. On February 18, 1851, a band of southwestern Indians attacked the family on a cliff overlooking the Gila River in present-day Arizona. All but three members of the family were killed. The attackers took thirteen-year-old Olive and eight-year-old Mary Ann captive and left their wounded fourteen-year-old brother Lorenzo for dead. Although Mary Ann did not survive, Olive lived to be rescued and reunited with her brother at Fort Yuma. On Olive’s return to white society in 1857, Royal B. Stratton published a book that sensationalized the story, and Olive herself went on lecture tours, telling of her experiences and thrilling audiences with her Mohave chin tattoos. Ridding the legendary tale of its anti-Indian bias and questioning the historic notion that the Oatmans’ attackers were Apaches, McGinty explores the extent to which Mary Ann and Olive may have adapted to life among the Mohaves and charts Olive’s eight years of touring and talking about her ordeal.

When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost His Brain

History's Unknown Chapters

Author: Giles Milton

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1250078784

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2909

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Obscure and addictive true tales from history told by one of our most entertaining historians, Giles Milton The first installment in Giles Milton's outrageously entertaining series, History's Unknown Chapters: colorful and accessible, intelligent and illuminating, Milton shows his customary historical flair as he delves into the little-known stories from the past. There's the cook aboard the Titanic, who pickled himself with whiskey and survived in the icy seas where most everyone else died. There's the man who survived the atomic bomb in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki. And there's many, many more. Covering everything from adventure, war, murder and slavery to espionage, including the stories of the female Robinson Crusoe, Hitler's final hours, Japan's deadly balloon bomb and the emperor of the United States, these tales deserve to be told.