In Search of Ice Age Americans

Author: Kenneth B. Tankersley

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 3003

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Reconstructs the daily lives of the earliest Americans, discussing how people survived the Ice Age and forever altered the course of human history.

Eyr the Hunter

A Story of Ice-Age America

Author: Margaret Zehmer Searcy,Joyce Haynes

Publisher: Pelican Publishing

ISBN: 9781565541016

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 40

View: 8331

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Eyr, a young hunter living 12,000 years ago near Alaska, plays an important role in the survival of his band.

American Flintknappers

Stone Age Art in the Age of Computers

Author: John C. Whittaker

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292757891

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 4326

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Making arrowheads, blades, and other stone tools was once a survival skill and is still a craft practiced by thousands of flintknappers around the world. In the United States, knappers gather at regional "knap-ins" to socialize, exchange ideas and material, buy and sell both equipment and knapped art, and make stone tools in the company of others. In between these gatherings, the knapping community stays connected through newsletters and the Internet. In this book, avid knapper and professional anthropologist John Whittaker offers an insider's view of the knapping community. He explores why stone tools attract modern people and what making them means to those who pursue this art. He describes how new members are incorporated into the knapping community, how novices learn the techniques of knapping and find their roles within the group, how the community is structured, and how ethics, rules, and beliefs about knapping are developed and transmitted. He also explains how the practice of knapping relates to professional archaeology, the trade in modern replicas of stone tools, and the forgery of artifacts. Whittaker's book thus documents a fascinating subculture of American life and introduces the wider public to an ancient and still rewarding craft.

Clovis Caches

Recent Discoveries and New Research

Author: Bruce B. Huckell

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826354831

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 5663

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This collection of essays investigates caches of Clovis tools, many of which have only recently come to light. The studies comprising this volume treat methodological and theoretical issues including the recognition of Clovis caches, Clovis lithic technology, mobility, and land use.

Prehistoric Projectile Points Found Along the Atlantic Coastal Plain

Author: Wm Jack Hranicky

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN: 1612330223

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 5441

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This publication was written to provide a source for archaeological projectile point typology for a region of the U.S. that over the years has been traditionally divided into: Northeast culture area Middle Atlantic culture area Southeastern culture area These divisions are based primarily on lithic technology and settlement patterns. While this focus tends to serve archaeological investigations, most of the prehistoric Indian habitation/occupation requires greater definition and appraisal from other sources within the archaeological community. Even among artifact collectors, there is a tendency to parcel these areas into the classic culture area concepts. This publication makes no attempts to refocus archaeology, but to show the vast overlaps of numerous point technologies. This is especially true over time; so that, for lithic point technology in general, there is a Panindian focus that can be applied to almost every tool type along the Atlantic Coast. This publication provides most of the published types from along the Atlantic seaboard. Each type has a basic description and the illustration is an ideal point for that type. A set of point references is provided; these make excellent (and needed) sources for the study of projectile point studies.

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology

Examining Technology Through Production and Use

Author: Jeffrey R. Ferguson

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781607320234

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 5930

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Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology is a guide for the design of archaeological experiments for both students and scholars. Experimental archaeology provides a unique opportunity to corroborate conclusions with multiple trials of repeatable experiments and can provide data otherwise unavailable to archaeologists without damaging sites, remains, or artifacts. Each chapter addresses a particular classification of material culture-ceramics, stone tools, perishable materials, composite hunting technology, butchering practices and bone tools, and experimental zooarchaeology-detailing issues that must be considered in the development of experimental archaeology projects and discussing potential pitfalls. The experiments follow coherent and consistent research designs and procedures and are placed in a theoretical context, and contributors outline methods that will serve as a guide in future experiments. This degree of standardization is uncommon in traditional archaeological research but is essential to experimental archaeology. The field has long been in need of a guide that focuses on methodology and design. This book fills that need not only for undergraduate and graduate students but for any archaeologist looking to begin an experimental research project.

First Peoples in a New World

Colonizing Ice Age America

Author: David J. Meltzer

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520943155

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 6355

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More than 12,000 years ago, in one of the greatest triumphs of prehistory, humans colonized North America, a continent that was then truly a new world. Just when and how they did so has been one of the most perplexing and controversial questions in archaeology. This dazzling, cutting-edge synthesis, written for a wide audience by an archaeologist who has long been at the center of these debates, tells the scientific story of the first Americans: where they came from, when they arrived, and how they met the challenges of moving across the vast, unknown landscapes of Ice Age North America. David J. Meltzer pulls together the latest ideas from archaeology, geology, linguistics, skeletal biology, genetics, and other fields to trace the breakthroughs that have revolutionized our understanding in recent years. Among many other topics, he explores disputes over the hemisphere's oldest and most controversial sites and considers how the first Americans coped with changing global climates. He also confronts some radical claims: that the Americas were colonized from Europe or that a crashing comet obliterated the Pleistocene megafauna. Full of entertaining descriptions of on-site encounters, personalities, and controversies, this is a compelling behind-the-scenes account of how science is illuminating our past.

Ice Age People of North America

Environments, Origins, and Adaptations

Author: Robson Bonnichsen,Karen L. Turnmire

Publisher: Oregon State University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 536

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This volume provides an up-to-date summary of important new discoveries from Northeast Asia and North America that are changing perceptions about the origin of the First Americans. Even though the peopling of the Americas has been the focus of scientific investigations for more than half a century, there is still no definitive evidence that will allow specialists to say when the First Americans initially arrived or who they were. However, this in no way diminishes the significance of the many new contributions being made in the field. The nineteen papers collected here provide regional archaeological syntheses and address such topics as ice marginal dynamics, the impact of plant nutrients in glacial margins, and periglacial ecology of large mammals. The concluding chapter discusses conceptual frameworks used to explain the peopling of the Americas.

California Prehistory

Colonization, Culture, and Complexity

Author: Terry L. Jones,Kathryn A. Klar

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0759113742

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 7307

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Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

Chronology of the American West

From 23,000 B.C.E. Through the Twentieth Century

Author: Scott C. Zeman

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 157607207X

Category: History

Page: 381

View: 8840

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Examines the critical events and major characters in the history of the American West.

Prehistory of the Americas

Author: Stuart J. Fiedel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521425445

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 5768

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Fiedel's book, exploring the development of the prehistoric cultures of North, Central and South America from about 10,000 BC to AD 1530, has been updated to include discussion of recent discoveries and analyses of their implications. The author describes how different regions of the New World evolved, affected by a variety of factors ranging from population growth to climate change. He compares the evolution of the New World with that of the cultures of the Old World. Discussion of the development of American archaeology from the early European encounters with native Americans to the "new" archaeology is also included.

America Before Columbus - History Series

Author: Matt Green

Publisher: Matt Green

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 154

View: 7579

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Who where the first Americans? The story is intriguing, and the fascinating narrative will hold the reader's complete attention. Most of the inhabitants were wiped out by plagues brought by the Europeans. You will learn how "Indians" lived throughout the Americas before 1492 and Columbus, only isolated bits of the story have reached the popular press. If your knowledge of the Native Americans begins and ends with what you learned in school years ago, or with the stereotypes perpetuated by Hollywood, you are in for quite a shock. This is not a book which will please many with an agenda on either the pro-development or pro-environment side, but it will be found invaluable by those who seek a better understanding of the "New World" before the Europeans "discovered" it.

Ice age hunters of the Rockies

Author: Dennis J. Stanford,Jane Stevenson Day

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 6876

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The ice age hunters of the Rocky Mountains were some of North America's earliest inhabitants. Although many scholars had long suspected that humans entered the Americas at an early date, no concrete proof existed until the find at Folsom, New Mexico, in 1926. There, J.D. Figgens of the Denver Museum of Natural History excavated fossil bison bones in direct association with human-made fluted stone points, demonstrating for the first time that humans and the ice age bison were contemporaries in the American Southwest. In the years following the Folsom discovery, new sites came to light that further confirmed the presence of late Pleistocene hunters in North America. Since the initial discoveries of ice age hunters in America, the ensuing 65 years have witnessed a rapidly enlarged database and the development of increasingly sophisticated analytical techniques that are reinterpreting the archaeological record. Ice Age Hunters of the Rockies explores the many questions that still surround the Pleistocene cultures of 12,000 years ago and the adaptations of these early civilizations to the last great ice age. In this important volume, a diverse group of top scholars discuss issues such as the time of arrival of the first Americans, adaptations to various environments, and the use by early people of high-altitude sites.

The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home

Author: Jim Harrison

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611171954

Category: Art

Page: 88

View: 9391

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With its fanlike evergreen fronds, soft trunk, and strong root system, the palmetto is a wind-adapted palm that can bend with strong sea breezes without breaking or being uprooted. Emblematic of survival against opposition, the palmetto tree has captured the imaginations of South Carolinians for generations, appearing on the state seal since the American Revolution and on the state flag since 1861. The palmetto was named South Carolina's official state tree by Governor Burnet R. Maybank in 1939, and in 1974 Governor John C. West commissioned acclaimed South Carolina artist Jim Harrison to paint the official palmetto tree portrait for the State of South Carolina, an image that adorns the State House to this day. The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home showcases the timeless, natural beauty of the state tree in marshland and coastal landscapes in the popular Harrison style. Appearing on glassware, stationery, jewelry, and many other decorative and functional objects, the palmetto tree is an omnipresent symbol in South Carolina culture. For Harrison the palmetto remains foremost an icon of the wondrous Carolina coastal habitats. Sweeping images of the coast have been part of Harrison's art since the beginning of his career, and he continues to illustrate his love of the South Carolina coast by capturing the beauty of the state tree amid the many stunning and enchanting scenes included here. The Palmetto and Its South Carolina Home also explores the historical background of the tree and its many ties to South Carolina's heritage as a symbol of strength and beauty worthy of this artistic celebration.

Chicago's Southeast Side Revisited

Author: Rod Sellers

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738519302

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 4817

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One of the phrases that has been used to describe Chicago's Southeast Side is "smokestacks and steeples." The community initially developed because of the steel industry, but it has been affected by the decline of the American steel industry in recent years. Today, the people of South Chicago, South Deering, the East Side, and Hegewisch look to the future. The community is, in many respects, at a crossroads. Will economic redevelopment occur, and if it does, at what price? Will the ecology and environment, damaged by years of abuse and neglect, be restored and protected? This second book about the region tells the story of this interesting and vibrant Chicago community from a chronological approach. It looks at important themes of American history from the perspective of this urban, working-class community. Industrialization, urbanization, unionization, immigration, and Americanization were themes that played out on the Southeast Side of Chicago. It examines how the community dealt with problems like depression, wars, pollution, and the decline of heavy industry-especially the steel industry.

The First Americans

Author: Joy Hakim

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195153200

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 184

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Discusses the United States' prehistory, including Native American life and early explorers such as Christopher Columbus and Ponce de Leon.

The Ethnic Dimension in American History

Author: James S. Olson,Heather Olson Beal

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444358391

Category: History

Page: 392

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The Ethnic Dimension in American History is a thorough survey of the role that ethnicity has played in shaping the history of the United States. Considering ethnicity in terms of race, language, religion and national origin, this important text examines its effects on social relations, public policy and economic development. A thorough survey of the role that ethnicity has played in shaping the history of the United States, including the effects of ethnicity on social relations, public policy and economic development Includes histories of a wide range of ethnic groups including African Americans, Native Americans, Jews, Chinese, Europeans, Japanese, Muslims, Koreans, and Latinos Examines the interaction of ethnic groups with one another and the dynamic processes of acculturation, modernization, and assimilation; as well as the history of immigration Revised and updated material in the fourth edition reflects current thinking and recent history, bringing the story up to the present and including the impact of 9/11

Across Atlantic Ice

The Origin of America's Clovis Culture

Author: Dennis J. Stanford,Bruce A. Bradley

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520949676

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 1519

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Who were the first humans to inhabit North America? According to the now familiar story, mammal hunters entered the continent some 12,000 years ago via a land bridge that spanned the Bering Sea. Distinctive stone tools belonging to the Clovis culture established the presence of these early New World people. But are the Clovis tools Asian in origin? Drawing from original archaeological analysis, paleoclimatic research, and genetic studies, noted archaeologists Dennis J. Stanford and Bruce A. Bradley challenge the old narrative and, in the process, counter traditional—and often subjective—approaches to archaeological testing for historical relatedness. The authors apply rigorous scholarship to a hypothesis that places the technological antecedents of Clovis in Europe and posits that the first Americans crossed the Atlantic by boat and arrived earlier than previously thought. Supplying archaeological and oceanographic evidence to support this assertion, the book dismantles the old paradigm while persuasively linking Clovis technology with the culture of the Solutrean people who occupied France and Spain more than 20,000 years ago.

A Very Different Age

Americans of the Progressive Era

Author: Steven J. Diner

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9781429927611

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 3245

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The early twentieth century was a time of technological revolution in the United States. New inventions and corporations were transforming the economic landscape, bringing a stunning array of consumer goods, millions of additional jobs, and ever more wealth. Steven J. Diner draws on the rich scholarship of recent social history to show how these changes affected Americans of all backgrounds and walks of life, and in doing so offers a striking new interpretation of a crucial epoch in our history.

Ice Age

Author: Brian Freemantle

Publisher: Severn House Publishers

ISBN: 9780727858283

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 3683

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An outbreak of a deadly disease that causes the acceleration of old age and death has climatologist Jack Stoddart heading a team of investigators from around the world to stop the spread of the virus.