Lost in Translation

An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words from Around the World

Author: Ella Frances Sanders

Publisher: Ten Speed Press

ISBN: 1607747111

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 112

View: 1855

DOWNLOAD NOW »
An artistic collection of more than 50 drawings featuring unique, funny, and poignant foreign words that have no direct translation into English. Did you know that the Japanese language has a word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees? Or that there’s a Finnish word for the distance a reindeer can travel before needing to rest? Lost in Translation brings to life more than fifty words that don’t have direct English translations with charming illustrations of their tender, poignant, and humorous definitions. Often these words provide insight into the cultures they come from, such as the Brazilian Portuguese word for running your fingers through a lover’s hair, the Italian word for being moved to tears by a story, or the Swedish word for a third cup of coffee. In this clever and beautifully rendered exploration of the subtleties of communication, you’ll find new ways to express yourself while getting lost in the artistry of imperfect translation. From the Hardcover edition.

Lost in Translation

An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words

Author: Ella Frances Sanders

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448192463

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 112

View: 6724

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Did you know that the Japanese have a word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees? Or, that there’s a Swedish word that means a traveller’s particular sense of anticipation before a trip? Lost in Translation, a New York Times bestseller, brings the nuanced beauty of language to life with over 50 beautiful ink illustrations. The words and definitions range from the lovely, such as goya, the Urdu word to describe the transporting suspension of belief that can occur in good storytelling, to the funny, like the Malay word pisanzapra, which translates as 'the time needed to eat a banana' . This is a collection full of surprises that will make you savour the wonderful, elusive, untranslatable words that make up a language.

Other-Wordly

words both strange and lovely from around the world

Author: Yee-Lum Mak

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 1452163111

Category: Reference

Page: 64

View: 1448

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Discover words to surprise, delight, and enamor. Learn terms for the sunlight that filters through the leaves of trees, for dancing awkwardly but with relish, and for the look shared by two people who each wish the other would speak first. Other-Wordly is an irresistible ebook for lovers of words and those lost for words alike.

They have a word for it

a lighthearted lexicon of untranslatable words & phrases

Author: Howard Rheingold

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780965080798

Category: Idioms

Page: 284

View: 5441

DOWNLOAD NOW »
"... more than forty familiar and obscure languages to discover genuinely useful (rather than simply odd) words that can open up new ways of understanding and experiencing life"--P. [4] of cover.

Schottenfreude

German Words for the Human Condition

Author: Ben Schott

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 039916670X

Category: HUMOR

Page: 96

View: 4759

DOWNLOAD NOW »
"From bestselling author and New York Times columnist Ben Schott comes an entertaining and much-needed German dictionary for the human condition, a gift book for wordsmiths and Deutschophiles alike"--

The Illustrated Book of Sayings

Curious Expressions from Around the World

Author: Ella Frances Sanders

Publisher: Ten Speed Press

ISBN: 1607749343

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 112

View: 9729

DOWNLOAD NOW »
From the New York Times bestselling author of Lost in Translation comes this charming illustrated collection of more than fifty expressions from around the globe that explore the nuances of language. From the hilarious and romantic to the philosophical and literal, the idioms, proverbs, and adages in The Illustrated Book of Sayings reveal the remarkable diversity, humor, and poignancy of the world's languages and cultures.

The Illustrated Book of Sayings

Curious Expressions from Around the World

Author: Ella Frances Sanders

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1607749335

Category: ART

Page: 112

View: 3847

DOWNLOAD NOW »
"An illustrated collection of the world's strangest and most wonderful expressions, idioms, and proverbs"--

Eating the Sun

Small Musings on a Vast Universe

Author: Ella Frances Sanders

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 9780143133162

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 4376

DOWNLOAD NOW »
"An illustrated exploration of the principles, laws, and wonders that rule our universe, our solar system, our world, and our daily lives from the bestselling creator of Lost in Translation"--

Dictionary of Untranslatables

A Philosophical Lexicon

Author: Barbara Cassin,Emily Apter,Jacques Lezra,Michael Wood

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400849918

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1344

View: 1813

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Characters in some languages, particularly Hebrew and Arabic, may not display properly due to device limitations. Transliterations of terms appear before the representations in foreign characters. This is an encyclopedic dictionary of close to 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms and concepts that defy easy--or any--translation from one language and culture to another. Drawn from more than a dozen languages, terms such as Dasein (German), pravda (Russian), saudade (Portuguese), and stato (Italian) are thoroughly examined in all their cross-linguistic and cross-cultural complexities. Spanning the classical, medieval, early modern, modern, and contemporary periods, these are terms that influence thinking across the humanities. The entries, written by more than 150 distinguished scholars, describe the origins and meanings of each term, the history and context of its usage, its translations into other languages, and its use in notable texts. The dictionary also includes essays on the special characteristics of particular languages--English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Originally published in French, this one-of-a-kind reference work is now available in English for the first time, with new contributions from Judith Butler, Daniel Heller-Roazen, Ben Kafka, Kevin McLaughlin, Kenneth Reinhard, Stella Sandford, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Jane Tylus, Anthony Vidler, Susan Wolfson, Robert J. C. Young, and many more.The result is an invaluable reference for students, scholars, and general readers interested in the multilingual lives of some of our most influential words and ideas. Covers close to 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms that defy easy translation between languages and cultures Includes terms from more than a dozen languages Entries written by more than 150 distinguished thinkers Available in English for the first time, with new contributions by Judith Butler, Daniel Heller-Roazen, Ben Kafka, Kevin McLaughlin, Kenneth Reinhard, Stella Sandford, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Jane Tylus, Anthony Vidler, Susan Wolfson, Robert J. C. Young, and many more Contains extensive cross-references and bibliographies An invaluable resource for students and scholars across the humanities

The Emotionary

A Dictionary of Words That Don't Exist for Feelings That Do

Author: Eden Sher

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0448493845

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 208

View: 6935

DOWNLOAD NOW »
An incredibly funny and very useful dictionary of words that don't exist for feelings that do written by actress Sher (ABC's "The Middle") and illustrated by acclaimed graphic novelist Wertz.

Found in Translation

How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World

Author: Nataly Kelly,Jost Zetzsche

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101611928

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 8572

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Translation. It’s everywhere we look, but seldom seen—until now. Found in Translation reveals the surprising and complex ways that translation shapes the world. Covering everything from holy books to hurricane warnings and poetry to peace treaties, Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche offer language lovers and pop culture fans alike an insider’s view of the ways in which translation spreads culture, fuels the global economy, prevents wars, and stops the outbreak of disease. Examples include how translation plays a key role at Google, Facebook, NASA, the United Nations, the Olympics, and more.

How to Speak Money: What the Money People Say-And What It Really Means

Author: John Lanchester

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393243389

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 1128

DOWNLOAD NOW »
“One of the world’s great explainers of the financial crisis and its aftermath.”—Michael Lewis To those who don’t speak it, the language of money can seem impenetrable and its ideas too complex to grasp. In How to Speak Money, John Lanchester—author of the New York Times best-selling book on the financial crisis, I.O.U.—bridges the gap between the money people and the rest of us. With characteristic wit and candor, Lanchester reveals how the world of finance really works: from the terms and conditions of your personal checking account to the evasions of bankers appearing in front of Congress. As Lanchester writes, we need to understand what the money people are talking about so that those who speak the language don’t just write the rules for themselves. Lanchester explains more than 300 words and phrases from “AAA rating” and “amortization” to “yield curve” and “zombie bank.” He covers things we say or hear every day—such as GDP, the IMF, credit, debt, equity, and inflation—and explains how hedge funds work, what the World Bank does, and why the language of money has gotten so complicated. Along the way he draws on everything from John Maynard Keynes to the Wu-Tang Clan, Friedrich Hayek to Thomas Piketty, The Wealth of Nations to Game of Thrones. A primer, a polemic, and a reference book, How to Speak Money makes economics understandable to anyone. After all, “money,” as Lanchester writes, “is a lot like babies, and once you know the language, the rule is the same as that put forward by Dr. Spock: ‘Trust yourself. You know more than you think you do.’”

Is That a Fish in Your Ear?

Translation and the Meaning of Everything

Author: David Bellos

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0865478724

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 7785

DOWNLOAD NOW »
A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 One of The Economist's 2011 Books of the Year People speak different languages, and always have. The Ancient Greeks took no notice of anything unless it was said in Greek; the Romans made everyone speak Latin; and in India, people learned their neighbors' languages—as did many ordinary Europeans in times past (Christopher Columbus knew Italian, Portuguese, and Castilian Spanish as well as the classical languages). But today, we all use translation to cope with the diversity of languages. Without translation there would be no world news, not much of a reading list in any subject at college, no repair manuals for cars or planes; we wouldn't even be able to put together flat-pack furniture. Is That a Fish in Your Ear? ranges across the whole of human experience, from foreign films to philosophy, to show why translation is at the heart of what we do and who we are. Among many other things, David Bellos asks: What's the difference between translating unprepared natural speech and translating Madame Bovary? How do you translate a joke? What's the difference between a native tongue and a learned one? Can you translate between any pair of languages, or only between some? What really goes on when world leaders speak at the UN? Can machines ever replace human translators, and if not, why? But the biggest question Bellos asks is this: How do we ever really know that we've understood what anybody else says—in our own language or in another? Surprising, witty, and written with great joie de vivre, this book is all about how we comprehend other people and shows us how, ultimately, translation is another name for the human condition.

In Other Words

A Language Lover's Guide to the Most Intriguing Words Around the World

Author: Christopher J. Moore

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780802718174

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 5355

DOWNLOAD NOW »
When ideas fail, words come in handy. But sometimes you can't find the right word, and what you want to say can't be found in the dictionary. English has its limitations, but the expression you're searching for may exist in another language. In Other Words is a unique collection of well-known and absolutely obscure "untranslatables"-linguistic gems that convey a feeling or notion with satisfying precision yet resist simple translation. This quirky lexicon of hard-to-translate words gives the reader a new way to look at the world and how words relate to us. The words are arranged by region or country of origin, and a brief introduction to each section-each done by a respected translator-gives insight into the culture of the people as well as the language. Each of these singular words is cleverly and thoroughly defined, with interesting details and references throughout. The search for that elusive mot juste may be over.

Still Lost in Translation

More misadventures in English abroad

Author: Charlie Croker

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1407007483

Category: Humor

Page: 176

View: 6540

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Have you ever arrived in a hotel room and been baffled by the information provided? Beware of your luggage. In your room you will find a minibar which is filled with alcoholics. Do not throw urine around. Have you ever been to a restaurant and wondered what on earth to order? Bored Meat Stew Lorry Driver Soup Kiss Lorraine Have you ever arrived in an airport and found that the supposedly helpful signs just make you feel more lost? You are required to declare all sorts of private things. Departure. Bus stop. Car rectal. Please buy your ticket consciously. Charlie Croker has, and in 2006 he gathered together what he thought was the definitive collection of English language howlers for his bestselling book Lost in Translation. But he reckoned without the great British public. Not only was the book a smash hit, it also opened the floodgates to a deluge of emails and letters stuffed full of further mistranslations and mutilated phrases. From a leaflet from the Museum of Rasputin in Russia (which is apparently situated in a house that belonged a pilot fish Zubov) to a song title on a pirated Pink Floyd CD (Come Fartably Numb), the scrambled sentences just kept flooding in. At the same time Charlie has continued his travels and picked up gems of his own. With such a wealth of material, a sequel wasn't just a necessity, it was a public service, and Still Lost in Translation is even more addictive, whimsical and side-splittingly hilarious than the first book.

Through the Language Glass

Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages

Author: Guy Deutscher

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 9781429970112

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 2328

DOWNLOAD NOW »
A masterpiece of linguistics scholarship, at once erudite and entertaining, confronts the thorny question of how—and whether—culture shapes language and language, culture Linguistics has long shied away from claiming any link between a language and the culture of its speakers: too much simplistic (even bigoted) chatter about the romance of Italian and the goose-stepping orderliness of German has made serious thinkers wary of the entire subject. But now, acclaimed linguist Guy Deutscher has dared to reopen the issue. Can culture influence language—and vice versa? Can different languages lead their speakers to different thoughts? Could our experience of the world depend on whether our language has a word for "blue"? Challenging the consensus that the fundaments of language are hard-wired in our genes and thus universal, Deutscher argues that the answer to all these questions is—yes. In thrilling fashion, he takes us from Homer to Darwin, from Yale to the Amazon, from how to name the rainbow to why Russian water—a "she"—becomes a "he" once you dip a tea bag into her, demonstrating that language does in fact reflect culture in ways that are anything but trivial. Audacious, delightful, and field-changing, Through the Language Glass is a classic of intellectual discovery.

Haggard Hawks and Paltry Poltroons

The Origins of English in Ten Words

Author: Paul Anthony Jones

Publisher: Constable

ISBN: 1472109414

Category: Humor

Page: 160

View: 6303

DOWNLOAD NOW »
What do the following ten words all have in common - haggard, mews, codger, arouse, musket, poltroon, gorge, allure, pounce and turn-tail? All fairly familiar and straightforward words, after a little digging into their histories it turns out that all of them derive from falconry: the adjective haggard described an adult falcon captured from the wild; mews were the enclosures hawks were kept in whilst moulting; codger is thought to come from 'cadger', the member of a hunting party who carried the birds' perches, and so on. This, essentially, is what Ten Words is all about - the book collects together hundreds of the most intriguing, surprising and little known histories and etymologies of a whole host of English words. From ancient place names to unusual languages, and obscure professions to military slang, this is a fascinating treasure trove of linguistic facts.

Articulate While Black

Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S.

Author: H. Samy Alim,Geneva Smitherman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199812969

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 205

View: 3454

DOWNLOAD NOW »
In Articulate While Black, two renowned scholars of Black Language address language and racial politics in the U.S. through an insightful examination of President Barack Obama's language use-and America's response to it.

The Untranslatables

The Most Intriguing Words from Around the World

Author: C. J. Moore

Publisher: Chambers Harrap Publishers

ISBN: 9780550105998

Category: English language

Page: 127

View: 8375

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Enliven your mind and enrich your daily conversation with The Untranslatables, a sublime and witty lexicon of fascinatingly precise phrases, for which there aren't direct English translations. From the German word Drachenfutter that encompasses actions aimed to diffuse a wife's fury at the appearance of her drunken husband to the national Finnish characteristic of sisu, which means something like a dogged and proud refusal to lie down and be beaten. If we don't have a word for it, we have to ask - why?

The Meaning of Tingo

and Other Extraordinary Words from Around the World

Author: Adam Jacot de Boinod

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101201299

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 224

View: 9193

DOWNLOAD NOW »
Did you know that in Hungary, pigs go rof-rof-rof, but in Japan they go boo boo boo? That there’s apparently the need in Bolivia for a word that means "I was rather too drunk last night but it was all their fault"? Adam Jacot de Boinod's book on extraordinary words from around the world will give you the definitions and phrases you need to make friends in every culture. A true writer's resource and the perfect gift for linguists, librarians, logophiles, and international jet-setters. While there’s no guarantee you’ll never pana po’o again (Hawaiian for "scratch your head in order to help you remember something you’ve forgotten"), or mingmu (Chinese for "die without regret"), at least you’ll know what tingo means, and that’s a start. “A book no well-stocked bookshelf, cistern top or handbag should be without. At last we know those Eskimo words for snow and how the Dutch render the sound of Rice Krispies. Adam Jacot de Boinod has produced an absolutely delicious little book: It goes Pif! Paf! Pouf! Cric! Crac! Croc! and Knisper! Knasper! Knusper! on every page.”—Stephen Fry