More Than Just Food

Food Justice and Community Change

Author: Garrett Broad

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520287452

Category: Social Science

Page: 276

View: 6641

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"Raising concerns about health, the environment, and economic inequality, critics of the industrial food system insist that we are in crisis. In response, food justice activists based in marginalized, low-income communities of color across the United States have developed community-based solutions to the nation's food system problems, arguing that activities like urban agriculture, cultural nutrition education, and food-related social enterprises can be an integral part of systemic social change. Highlighting the work of Community Services Unlimited, a South Los Angeles food justice group founded by the Black Panther Party, More Than Just Food explores the possibilities and limitations of the community-based approach, offering a networked examination of the food justice movement in the age of the 'nonprofit industrial complex'"--Provided by publisher.

More Than Just Food

Food Justice and Community Change

Author: Garrett Broad

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520287444

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 8210

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"Raising concerns about health, the environment, and economic inequality, critics of the industrial food system insist that we are in crisis. In response, food justice activists based in marginalized, low-income communities of color across the United States have developed community-based solutions to the nation's food system problems, arguing that activities like urban agriculture, cultural nutrition education, and food-related social enterprises can be an integral part of systemic social change. Highlighting the work of Community Services Unlimited, a South Los Angeles food justice group founded by the Black Panther Party, More Than Just Food explores the possibilities and limitations of the community-based approach, offering a networked examination of the food justice movement in the age of the 'nonprofit industrial complex'"--Provided by publisher.

More Than Just Food

Food Justice and Community Change

Author: Garrett Broad

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520962567

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 4394

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The industrial food system has created a crisis in the United States that is characterized by abundant food for privileged citizens and “food deserts” for the historically marginalized. In response, food justice activists based in low-income communities of color have developed community-based solutions, arguing that activities like urban agriculture, nutrition education, and food-related social enterprises can drive systemic social change. Focusing on the work of several food justice groups—including Community Services Unlimited, a South Los Angeles organization founded as the nonprofit arm of the Southern California Black Panther Party—More Than Just Food explores the possibilities and limitations of the community-based approach, offering a networked examination of the food justice movement in the age of the nonprofit industrial complex.

Food Justice

Author: Robert Gottlieb,Anupama Joshi

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262288648

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 9378

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In today's food system, farm workers face difficult and hazardous conditions, low-income neighborhoods lack supermarkets but abound in fast-food restaurants and liquor stores, food products emphasize convenience rather than wholesomeness, and the international reach of American fast-food franchises has been a major contributor to an epidemic of "globesity." To combat these inequities and excesses, a movement for food justice has emerged in recent years seeking to transform the food system from seed to table. In Food Justice, Robert Gottlieb and Anupama Joshi tell the story of this emerging movement. A food justice framework ensures that the benefits and risks of how food is grown and processed, transported, distributed, and consumed are shared equitably. Gottlieb and Joshi recount the history of food injustices and describe current efforts to change the system, including community gardens and farmer training in Holyoke, Massachusetts, youth empowerment through the Rethinkers in New Orleans, farm-to-school programs across the country, and the Los Angeles school system's elimination of sugary soft drinks from its cafeterias. And they tell how food activism has succeeded at the highest level: advocates waged a grassroots campaign that convinced the Obama White House to plant a vegetable garden. The first comprehensive inquiry into this emerging movement, Food Justice addresses the increasing disconnect between food and culture that has resulted from our highly industrialized food system.

Cultivating Food Justice

Race, Class, and Sustainability

Author: Alison Hope Alkon,Julian Agyeman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262016265

Category: Science

Page: 389

View: 3968

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Popularized by such best-selling authors as Michael Pollan, Barbara Kingsolver, and Eric Schlosser, a growing food movement urges us to support sustainable agriculture by eating fresh food produced on local family farms. But many low-income neighborhoods and communities of color have been systematically deprived of access to healthy and sustainable food. These communities have been actively prevented from producing their own food and often live in "food deserts" where fast food is more common than fresh food. Cultivating Food Justice describes their efforts to envision and create environmentally sustainable and socially just alternatives to the food system. Bringing together insights from studies of environmental justice, sustainable agriculture, critical race theory, and food studies, Cultivating Food Justice highlights the ways race and class inequalities permeate the food system, from production to distribution to consumption. The studies offered in the book explore a range of important issues, including agricultural and land use policies that systematically disadvantage Native American, African American, Latino/a, and Asian American farmers and farmworkers; access problems in both urban and rural areas; efforts to create sustainable local food systems in low-income communities of color; and future directions for the food justice movement. These diverse accounts of the relationships among food, environmentalism, justice, race, and identity will help guide efforts to achieve a just and sustainable agriculture.

City Bountiful

A Century of Community Gardening in America

Author: Laura J. Lawson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520243439

Category: Architecture

Page: 363

View: 398

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Since the 1890s, providing places for people to garden has been an inventive strategy to improve American urban conditions. There have been vacant-lot gardens, school gardens, Depression-era relief gardens, victory gardens, and community gardens--each representing a consistent impulse to return to gardening during times of social and economic change. In this critical history of community gardening in America, Laura J. Lawson documents the evolution of urban garden programs in the United States. Her narrative focuses on the values associated with gardening, the ebb and flow of campaigns during times of social and economic crisis, organizational strategies of these primarily volunteer campaigns, and the sustainability of current programs. [from publisher description].

Weighing In

Obesity, Food Justice, and the Limits of Capitalism

Author: Julie Guthman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520266242

Category: Social Science

Page: 227

View: 7238

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"A bold, compelling challenge to conventional thinking about obesity and its fixes, Weighing In is one of the most important books on food politics to hit the shelves in a long time." —Susanne Freidberg, author of Fresh: A Perishable History "Weighing In is filled with counterintuitive surprises that should make us skeptics of all kinds of food -- whether local, fast, slow, junk or health -- but also gives us the practical tools to effectively scrutinize the stale buffet of popularly-accepted health wisdom before we digest it." —Paul Robbins, professor of Geography and Development, University of Arizona "If you liked Michael Pollan, this should be your next read. Guthman gives us the research behind the questions we should be asking, but, falling all over ourselves in the rush to consensus, we have overlooked. A self-described Berkeley foodie, Guthman takes on the self-satisfaction of the alternative food movement and places it in rich context, drawing on research in health, economics, labor, agriculture, sociology, and politics. This marvelous, surprising book is a true game-changer in our national conversation about food and justice." —Anna Kirkland, author of Fat Rights: Dilemmas of Difference and Personhood “This groundbreaking book calls into question the ubiquitous claim that ‘good food’ will solve the social and health dilemmas of today. Combining political economic analysis, cultural critique, and clear explanation of scientific discoveries, the author challenges our deeply held convictions about society, food, bodies, and environments.” —Becky Mansfield, editor of Privatization: Property and the Remaking of Nature-Society Relations "Step back from that farmer's market -- Guthman shows us that good foods and good eating are not enough. By questioning the fuzzy facts on obesity, the impact of environment, and capitalism's relentless push to consume, Weighing In challenges us to think harder, and better, about what it really takes to be healthy in the modern age." —Carolyn de la Peña, author of Empty Pleasures: The Story of Artificial Sweetener from Saccharin to Splenda

Closing the Food Gap

Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty

Author: Mark Winne

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807047317

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 199

View: 9011

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From the War on Poverty to new farmers' markets, a food expert tackles America's dangerous dietary split With a new Foreword Closing the Food Gap exposes America's dangerous dietary split: from patrons of food pantries, bodegas, and convenience stores to the more comfortable classes who increasingly seek out organic and local products. Calling largely on his own experience in food activism, and mixing in surprisingly witty observations, Mark Winne ultimately envisions realistic partnerships in which family farms and impoverished communities come together to get healthy, locally produced food onto everyone's table.

Free for All

Fixing School Food in America

Author: Janet Poppendieck

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520269888

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 2209

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As this book takes us on an eye-opening journey into the nation's school kitchens, the author offers an assessment of school food in the United States. She reveals the forces that determine how lunch is served, such as the financial troubles of schools, the commercialization of childhood, and the reliance on market models. The author explores the deep politics of food provision from multiple perspectives including history, policy, nutrition, environmental sustainability, taste, and more. How did our children end up eating nachos, pizza, and Tater Tots for lunch? How did we get into the absurd situation in which nutritionally regulated meals compete with fast food items and snack foods loaded with sugar, salt, and fat? What is the nutritional profile of the federal meals? How well are they reaching students who need them? Opening a window onto our culture as a whole, she concludes with a vision for change: fresh, healthy food for all children as a regular part of their school day.

The New Food Activism

Opposition, Cooperation, and Collective Action

Author: Alison Alkon,Julie Guthman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520292138

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 6655

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"New and exciting forms of food activism are emerging as supporters of sustainable agriculture increasingly recognize the need for a broader, more strategic and more politicized food politics that engages with questions of social, racial, and economic justice. This book highlights examples of campaigns to restrict industrial agriculture's use of pesticides and other harmful technologies, struggles to improve the pay and conditions of workers throughout the food system, and alternative projects that seek to de-emphasize notions of individualism and private ownership. Grounded in over a decade of scholarly critique of food activism, this volume seeks to answer the question of "what next," inspiring scholars, students, and activists toward collective, cooperative, and oppositional struggles for change."--Provided by publisher.

Beyond the Kale

Urban Agriculture and Social Justice Activism in New York City

Author: Kristin Reynolds,Nevin Cohen

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 082034950X

Category: Social Science

Page: 189

View: 8207

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Urban agriculture is increasingly considered an important part of creating just and sustainable cities. Yet the benefits that many people attribute to urban agriculture--fresh food, green space, educational opportunities--can mask structural inequities, thereby making political transformation harder to achieve. Realizing social and environmental justice requires moving beyond food production to address deeper issues such as structural racism, gender inequity, and economic disparities. Beyond the Kale argues that urban agricultural projects focused explicitly on dismantling oppressive systems have the greatest potential to achieve substantive social change. Through in-depth interviews and public forums with some of New York City's most prominent urban agriculture activists and supporters, Kristin Reynolds and Nevin Cohen illustrate how some urban farmers and gardeners not only grow healthy food for their communities but also use their activities and spaces to disrupt the dynamics of power and privilege that perpetuate inequity. Addressing a significant gap in the urban agriculture literature, Beyond the Kale prioritizes the voices of people of color and women--activists and leaders whose strategies have often been underrepresented within the urban agriculture movement--and it examines the roles of scholarship in advancing social justice initiatives.

Balancing on a Planet

The Future of Food and Agriculture

Author: David A. Cleveland

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520277414

Category: Cooking

Page: 352

View: 9474

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This book is an interdisciplinary primer on critical thinking and effective action for the future of our global agrifood system, based on an understanding of the system’s biological and sociocultural roots. Key components of the book are a thorough analysis of the assumptions underlying different perspectives on problems related to food and agriculture around the world and a discussion of alternative solutions. David Cleveland argues that combining selected aspects of small-scale traditional agriculture with modern scientific agriculture can help balance our biological need for food with its environmental impact—and continue to fulfill cultural, social, and psychological needs related to food. Balancing on a Planet is based on Cleveland’s research and engaging teaching about food and agriculture for more than three decades. It is a tool to help students, faculty, researchers, and interested readers understand debates about the current crisis and alternatives for the future.

California Cuisine and Just Food

Author: Sally K. Fairfax,Louise Nelson Dyble,Greig Tor Guthey,Lauren Gwin,Monica Moore,Jennifer Sokolove,Marion Nestle

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262304937

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 376

View: 5521

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Can a celebrity chef find common ground with an urban community organizer? Can a maker of organic cheese and a farm worker share an agenda for improving America's food? In the San Francisco Bay area, unexpected alliances signal the widening concerns of diverse alternative food proponents. What began as niche preoccupations with parks, the environment, food aesthetics, and taste has become a broader and more integrated effort to achieve food democracy: agricultural sustainability, access for all to good food, fairness for workers and producers, and public health. This book maps that evolution in northern California. The authors show that progress toward food democracy in the Bay area has been significant: innovators have built on familiar yet quite radical understandings of regional cuisine to generate new, broadly shared expectations about food quality, and activists have targeted the problems that the conventional food system creates. But, they caution despite the Bay Area's favorable climate, progressive politics, and food culture many challenges remain.

Food Justice Now!

Deepening the Roots of Social Struggle

Author: Joshua Sbicca

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 1452957436

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 1638

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A rallying cry to link the food justice movement to broader social justice debates The United States is a nation of foodies and food activists, many of them progressives, and yet their overwhelming concern for what they consume often hinders their engagement with social justice more broadly. Food Justice Now! charts a path from food activism to social justice activism that integrates the two. It calls on the food-focused to broaden and deepen their commitment to the struggle against structural inequalities both within and beyond the food system. In an engrossing, historically grounded, and ethnographically rich narrative, Joshua Sbicca argues that food justice is more than just a myopic focus on food, allowing scholars and activists alike to investigate the causes behind inequities and evaluate and implement political strategies to overcome them. Focusing on carceral, labor, and immigration crises, Sbicca tells the stories of three California-based food movement organizations, showing that when activists use food to confront neoliberal capitalism and institutional racism, they can creatively expand how to practice and achieve food justice. Sbicca sets his central argument in opposition to apolitical and individual solutions, discussing national food movement campaigns and the need for economically and racially just food policies—a matter of vital public concern with deep implications for building collective power across a diversity of interests.

Food Justice

A Primer

Author: Saryta Rodríguez

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780998994635

Category:

Page: 246

View: 2434

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Food Justice: A Primer is a collection of essays by activists, academics, farmers, and others involved in the Food Justice Movement examining food justice and food sovereignty from a variety of angles. These essays range in scope and tone from personal, hands-on experiences to macro-level observations of how communities' ability to both access healthful, justly-produced food and determine for themselves how they are fed can be improved upon, including efforts currently underway toward these ends. For too long, the Food Justice Movement has been senselessly divided between those who focus on the rights of humans and those who uphold the rights of nonhumans. In truth, the most just and efficient way forward to promote this cause is for these communities to come together and work in solidarity with one another, as myriad individuals and organizations around the world demonstrate with their hard work and careful analysis. This book aims to illustrate why this is necessary while confirming that it is possible, in hopes of inspiring further cooperation and collaboration between seemingly disparate causes under the umbrella of Food Justice. Every book sold helps support "Casa Vegana de la Comunidad," a community-led food justice project from Chilis on Wheels based in Puerto Rico. Chilis on Wheels founded the now permanent community house after providing hurricane relief to thousands of Puerto Ricans after hurricane Maria in 2017. The organization also helps provide food and other resources to homeless people and nonhuman people through its various chapters across mainland U.S. Endorsements: "This is an incredibly urgent intersection that needs to be addressed by both the vegan/animal rights movement and greater food justice movement. Rodriguez hits the nail on the head - we cannot solve one without the other. Animal rights activists need to understand that getting the world to "go vegan," especially without consideration as to where our plant foods come from, will not automatically fix local, national, and global systems of food production and redistribution. Meanwhile, food justice activists need to understand that the production and consumption of animal products works directly against their own objectives. I'm thrilled that there is finally a book that addresses these discrepancies to both audiences. This is a new favorite that I will definitely be recommending to all my friends and colleagues." -Karla R Vargas, co-founder of La Raza for Liberation "Food Justice: A Primer" critically examines the overlapping connections between various liberation movements, managing to do so unapologetically yet accessibly. This is the perfect read for anyone who cares about changing the world." -Jasmin Singer, Senior Editor of VegNews Magazine, co-host of the Our Hen House podcast "With 7.5 billion people on the planet today, there has never been a stronger disconnect between what we choose to eat and the impact those choices have on our planet and the living beings who inhabit it. Food Justice: A Primer draws critical connections between agriculture's environmental impact, food scarcity, inequality, and justice for all- human and non-human alike. This powerful, collaborative effort is a must-read for anyone who eats." -Hope Bohanec, Executive Director of Compassionate Living, Project Manager at United Poultry Concerns "This incredible book is thoughtful, inclusive and comprehensive and provides the requisite readings and perspectives to fully understand and address the issues and challenges before us - locally and globally. Most importantly, it is a call to action that resonates with my favorite three words: Si Se Puede!" -Stephen Ritz, Top Ten Finalist of the Global Teacher Prize, Founder of Green Bronx Machine

Divided Spirits

Tequila, Mezcal, and the Politics of Production

Author: Sarah Bowen

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520281055

Category: Cooking

Page: 280

View: 6901

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"Divided Spirits tells the stories of tequila and mezcal, two of Mexico{u2019}s most iconic products. In recent years, as consumers increasingly demand to connect with the people and places that produce their food, the concept of terroir - the taste of place - has become more and more prominent. Tequila and mezcal are both protected by denominations of origin (DOs), legal designations that aim to guarantee a product{u2019}s authenticity based on its link to terroir. Advocates argue that the DOs expand market opportunities, protect cultural heritage, and ensure the reputation of Mexico{u2019}s national spirits. Yet this book shows how the institutions that are supposed to guard 'the legacy of all Mexicans' often fail those who are most in need of protection: the small producers, agave farmers, and other workers who have been making tequila and mezcal for generations. Divided Spirits suggests that we must move beyond market-based models if we want to safeguard local products and the people who make them. Instead, we need systems of production, consumption, and oversight that are more democratic, more inclusive, and more participatory."--Page 4 of cover.

Dangerous Digestion

The Politics of American Dietary Advice

Author: E. Melanie DuPuis

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520275470

Category: Cooking

Page: 232

View: 372

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Throughout American history, ingestion (eating) has functioned as a metaphor for interpreting and imagining this society and its political systems. Discussions of American freedom itself are pervaded with ingestive metaphors of choice (what to put in) and control (what to keep out). From the country’s founders to the abolitionists to the social activists of today, those seeking to form and reform American society have cast their social-change goals in ingestive terms of choice and control. But they have realized their metaphors in concrete terms as well, purveying specific advice to the public about what to eat or not. These conversations about “social change as eating” reflect American ideals of freedom, purity, and virtue. Drawing on social and political history as well as the history of science and popular culture, Dangerous Digestion examines how American ideas about dietary reform mirror broader thinking about social reform. Inspired by new scientific studies of the human body as a metabiome—a collaboration of species rather than an isolated, intact, protected, and bounded individual—E. Melanie DuPuis invokes a new metaphor—digestion—to reimagine the American body politic, opening social transformations to ideas of mixing, fermentation, and collaboration. In doing so, the author explores how social activists can rethink politics as inclusive processes that involve the inherently risky mixing of cultures, standpoints, and ideas.

Making Modern Meals

How Americans Cook Today

Author: Amy B. Trubek

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520289226

Category: Cooking

Page: 292

View: 5409

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Home cooking is crucial to our lives, but today we no longer identify it as an obligatory everyday chore. By looking closely at the stories and practices of contemporary American home cooks--witnessing them in the kitchen and at the table--Amy B. Trubek reveals our episodic but also engaged relationship to making meals. Making Modern Meals explores the state of American cooking over the past century and across all its varied practices, whether cooking is considered a chore, a craft, or a creative process. Trubek challenges current assumptions about who cooks, who doesn't, and what this means for culture, cuisine, and health. She locates, identifies, and discusses the myriad ways Americans cook in the modern age, and in doing so, argues that changes in making our meals--from shopping to cooking to dining--have created new cooks, new cooking categories, and new culinary challenges.

The Darjeeling Distinction

Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Tea Plantations in India

Author: Sarah Besky

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520277392

Category: Cooking

Page: 233

View: 5562

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Nestled in the Himalayan foothills of Northeast India, Darjeeling is synonymous with some of the finest and most expensive tea in the world. It is also home to a violent movement for regional autonomy that, like the tea industry, dates back to the days of colonial rule. In this nuanced ethnography, Sarah Besky narrates the lives of tea workers in Darjeeling. She explores how notions of fairness, value, and justice shifted with the rise of fair-trade practices and postcolonial separatist politics in the region. This is the first book to explore how fair-trade operates in the context of large-scale plantations. Readers in a variety of disciplines—anthropology, sociology, geography, environmental studies, and food studies—will gain a critical perspective on how plantation life is changing as Darjeeling struggles to reinvent its signature commodity for twenty-first-century consumers. The Darjeeling Distinction challenges fair-trade policy and practice, exposing how trade initiatives often fail to consider the larger environmental, historical, and sociopolitical forces that shape the lives of the people they intended to support.

Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice

From Loncheras to Lobsta Love

Author: Julian Agyeman,Caitlin Matthews,Hannah Sobel

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262036576

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 4455

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The food truck on the corner could be a brightly painted old-style lonchera offering tacos or an upscale mobile vendor serving lobster rolls. Customers range from gastro-tourists to construction workers, all eager for food that is delicious, authentic, and relatively inexpensive. Although some cities that host food trucks encourage their proliferation, others throw up regulatory roadblocks. This book examines the food truck phenomenon in North American cities from Los Angeles to Montreal, taking a novel perspective: social justice. It considers the motivating factors behind a city's promotion or restriction of mobile food vending, and how these motivations might connect to or impede broad goals of social justice. The contributors investigate the discriminatory implementation of rules, with gentrified hipsters often receiving preferential treatment over traditional immigrants; food trucks as part of community economic development; and food trucks' role in cultural identity formation. They describe, among other things, mobile food vending in Portland, Oregon, where relaxed permitting encourages street food; the criminalization of food trucks by Los Angeles and New York City health codes; food as cultural currency in Montreal; social and spatial bifurcation of food trucks in Chicago and Durham, North Carolina; and food trucks as a part of Vancouver, Canada's, self-branding as the "Greenest City." ContributorsJulian Agyeman, Sean Basinski, Jennifer Clark, Ana Croegaert, Kathleen Dunn, Renia Ehrenfeucht, Emma French, Matthew Gebhardt, Phoebe Godfrey, Amy Hanser, Robert Lemon, Nina Martin, Caitlin Matthews, Nathan McClintock, Alfonso Morales, Alan Nash, Katherine Alexandra Newman, Lenore Lauri Newman, Alex Novie, Matthew Shapiro, Hannah Sobel, Mark Vallianatos, Ginette Wessel, Edward Whittall, Mackenzie Wood