Ohio Archaeology

An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio's Ancient American Indian Cultures

Author: Bradley Thomas Lepper

Publisher: Orange Frazer PressInc

ISBN: 9781882203390

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 2364

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Ohio Archaeology is a valuable resource for readers, teachers and students who want to learn more about the lifeways and legacies of the first Ohioans.

Indian Mounds of the Middle Ohio Valley

A Guide to Mounds and Earthworks of the Adena, Hopewell, Cole, and Fort Ancient People

Author: Susan L. Woodward,Jerry N. McDonald

Publisher: McDonald and Woodward Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7169

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Mounds and earthworks are the most conspicuous elements of prehistoric American Indian culture to be found on the landscape of eastern North America. Some of the largest, most elaborate, and best known of these structures were built by the Woodland and Late Prehistoric Indians of the middle Ohio Valley. This second edition of the popular Indian Mounds of the Middle Ohio Valley identifies, describes, and provides access information for more than 70 mound and earthwork sites that are open to visitation by the public or that can be seen from public space. In addition, this book provides an overview of the culture of the mound building Indians and the fate of their mounds during the Historic period, and identifies numerous sources of additional information about the subject.

Ohio

A History of the Buckeye State

Author: Kevin F. Kern,Gregory S. Wilson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118548329

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 503

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Ohio: A History of the Buckeye State explores the breadth of Ohio’s past, tracing the course of history from its earliest geological periods to the present day in an accessible, single-volume format. Features the most up-to-date research on Ohio, drawing on material in the disciplines of history, archaeology, and political science Includes thematic chapters focusing on major social, economic, and political trends Amply illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographs Receipient of the Ohio Geneological Society's Henry Howe Award in 2014

Shamans of the Lost World

A Cognitive Approach to the Prehistoric Religion of the Ohio Hopewell

Author: William F. Romain

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780759119055

Category: Religion

Page: 261

View: 3639

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Shamans of the Lost World examines the archaeological evidence of Hopewell peoples to deepen our understanding of their practice of shamanism.

Hopewell Ceremonial Landscapes of Ohio

More Than Mounds and Geometric Earthworks

Author: Mark Lynott

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782977546

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 4406

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Nearly 2000 years ago, people living in the river valleys of southern Ohio built earthen monuments on a scale that is unmatched in the archaeological record for small-scale societies. The period from c. 200 BC to c. AD 500 (Early to Middle Woodland) witnessed the construction of mounds, earthen walls, ditches, borrow pits and other earthen and stone features covering dozen of hectares at many sites and hundreds of hectares at some. The development of the vast Hopewell Culture geometric earthwork complexes such as those at Mound City, Chilicothe; Hopewell; and the Newark earthworks was accompanied by the establishment of wide-ranging cultural contacts reflected in the movement of exotic and strikingly beautiful artefacts such as elaborate tobacco pipes, obsidian and chert arrowheads, copper axes and regalia, animal figurines and delicately carved sheets of mica. These phenomena, coupled with complex burial rituals, indicate the emergence of a political economy based on a powerful ideology of individual power and prestige, and the creation of a vast cultural landscape within which the monument complexes were central to a ritual cycle encompassing a substantial geographical area. The labour needed to build these vast cultural landscapes exceeds population estimates for the region, and suggests that people from near (and possibly far) travelled to the Scioto and other river valleys to help with construction of these monumental earthen complexes. Here, Mark Lynott draws on more than a decade of research and extensive new datasets to re-examine the spectacular and massive scale Ohio Hopewell landscapes and to explore the society that created them.

Mysteries of the Hopewell

Astronomers, Geometers, and Magicians of the Eastern Woodlands

Author: William F. Romain

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 4412

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Buried beneath today's Midwestern towns, under several layers of earth and the accumulated debris of two thousand years, are the clues to an ancient mystery. A Native American people, now known as the Hopewell, lived and worked these lands, building earthworks which in some instances dwarf the ruins at Stonehenge. More significantly, these mammoth earthworks were built in different geometric shapes, using a standard unit of measure and aligned to the cycles of the sun and the moon. Using the foundation of existing scholarship, Mysteries of the Hopewell presents new discoveries showing the accomplishments of the Mound Builders in astronomy, geometry, measurement, and counting. William Romain then goes one step further to theorize why generations of people toiled to move millions of tons of earth to form these precise structures, joining the ranks of the Egyptians, Mayans, Greeks, Chinese, and other advanced ancient cultures. William Romain's Mysteries of the Hopewell will appeal to many readers, including anthropologists, mathematicians, and historians, but perhaps especially to readers curious about ancient cultures and seeking explanations for these magnificent earthen structures.

Weaving the Past

A History of Latin America's Indigenous Women from the Prehispanic Period to the Present

Author: Susan Kellogg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198040422

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 2720

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Weaving the Past offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary history of Latin America's indigenous women. While the book concentrates on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, it covers indigenous people in other parts of South and Central America, including lowland peoples in and beyond Brazil, and Afro-indigenous peoples, such as the Garifuna, of Central America. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, it argues that change, not continuity, has been the norm for indigenous peoples whose resilience in the face of complex and long-term patterns of cultural change is due in no small part to the roles, actions, and agency of women. The book provides broad coverage of gender roles in native Latin America over many centuries, drawing upon a range of evidence from archaeology, anthropology, religion, and politics. Primary and secondary sources include chronicles, codices, newspaper articles, and monographic work on specific regions. Arguing that Latin America's indigenous women were the critical force behind the more important events and processes of Latin America's history, Kellogg interweaves the region's history of family, sexual, and labor history with the origins of women's power in prehispanic, colonial, and modern South and Central America. Shying away from interpretations that treat women as house bound and passive, the book instead emphasizes women's long history of performing labor, being politically active, and contributing to, even supporting, family and community well-being.

Archaeology in America: An Encyclopedia [4 volumes]

An Encyclopedia

Author: Linda S. Cordell,Kent Lightfoot,Francis McManamon,George Milner

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313021899

Category: Social Science

Page: 1488

View: 9318

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The greatness of America is right under our feet. The American past—the people, battles, industry and homes—can be found not only in libraries and museums, but also in hundreds of archaeological sites that scientists investigate with great care. These sites are not in distant lands, accessible only by research scientists, but nearby—almost every locale possesses a parcel of land worthy of archaeological exploration. Archaeology in America is the first resource that provides students, researchers, and anyone interested in their local history with a survey of the most important archaeological discoveries in North America. Leading scholars, most with an intimate knowledge of the area, have written in-depth essays on over 300 of the most important archaeological sites that explain the importance of the site, the history of the people who left the artifacts, and the nature of the ongoing research. Archaeology in America divides it coverage into 8 regions: the Arctic and Subarctic, the Great Basin and Plateau, the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains, the Midwest, the Northeast, the Southeast, the Southwest, and the West Coast. Each entry provides readers with an accessible overview of the archaeological site as well as books and articles for further research.

Ancient America

Fifty Archaeological Sites to See for Yourself

Author: Kenneth L. Feder

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 144226313X

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 9703

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Presenting “the real deal” of American antiquity—as opposed to the hyped fare of many cable TV shows—Kenneth Feder invites readers to explore the stunning technological, architectural, engineering, and artistic achievements of America’s first peoples. Part travel guide, part friendly reference, Ancient America showcases fifty iconic and publicly-accessible sites located across the contiguous United States—including monumental pyramids of earth, “castles” ensconced in cliff niches, and vast rock art galleries. Among the places profiled are four World Heritage Sites (Chaco Canyon, NM; Mesa Verde, CO; Cahokia, IL; Poverty Point, LA); numerous Historic Landmarks and National Monuments (including Crystal River, FL; Town Creek Mound, NC; Casa Grande, AZ; and Hovenweep, UT); and stunningly diverse sites ranging from Serpent Mound (OH) and Horsethief Lake (WA) to Canyon de Chelly (AZ) and Nine Mile Canyon (UT). In addition to practical visitor information, Feder tells the fascinating stories of each site as revealed by archaeological research. Introductory chapters delve into the deep past of Native America; historical and cultural details as well as original photography round out the site entries. Readers will be inspired to visit these remarkable places where the past continues to resonate in the present.

Early Native Americans in West Virginia: The Fort Ancient Culture

Author: Darla Spencer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467118516

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 2164

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Once thought of as Indian hunting grounds with no permanent inhabitants, West Virginia is teeming with evidence of a thriving early native population. Today's farmers can hardly plow their fields without uncovering ancient artifacts, evidence of at least ten thousand years of occupation. Members of the Fort Ancient culture resided along the rich bottomlands of southern West Virginia during the Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric periods. Lost to time and rediscovered in the 1880s, Fort Ancient sites dot the West Virginia landscape. This volume explores sixteen of these sites, including Buffalo, Logan and Orchard. Archaeologist Darla Spencer excavates the fascinating lives of some of the Mountain State's earliest inhabitants in search of who these people were, what languages they spoke and who their descendants may be.

The Newark Earthworks

Enduring Monuments, Contested Meanings

Author: Lindsay Jones,Richard D. Shiels

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813937795

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 6418

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Considered a wonder of the ancient world, the Newark Earthworks—the gigantic geometrical mounds of earth built nearly two thousand years ago in the Ohio valley--have been a focal point for archaeologists and surveyors, researchers and scholars for almost two centuries. In their prime one of the premier pilgrimage destinations in North America, these monuments are believed to have been ceremonial centers used by ancestors of Native Americans, called the "Hopewell culture," as social gathering places, religious shrines, pilgrimage sites, and astronomical observatories. Yet much of this territory has been destroyed by the city of Newark, and the site currently "hosts" a private golf course, making it largely inaccessible to the public. The first book-length volume devoted to the site, The Newark Earthworks reveals the magnitude and the geometric precision of what remains of the earthworks and the site’s undeniable importance to our history. Including contributions from archaeologists, historians, cultural geographers, and cartographers, as well as scholars in religious studies, legal studies, indigenous studies, and preservation studies, the book follows an interdisciplinary approach to shine light on the Newark Earthworks and argues compellingly for its designation as a World Heritage Site.

The GE Mound Case

The Archaeological Disaster and Criminal Persecution of Artifact Collector Art Gerber

Author: Jim Fisher

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781492745914

Category: True Crime

Page: 194

View: 6533

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In 1988, General Electric officials in Indiana destroyed a 2000-year-old Native American ceremonial mound, setting into motion a series of shocking political and legal battles. To placate Native American activists and professional archaeologists, federal prosecutors and General Electric scapegoated Art Gerber, a prominent artifact collector who dug briefly on the destroyed mound. Mr. Gerber's prosecution under the federal Archaeological Protection Act made legal history-- and frightened tens of thousands of Indian relic collectors. THE GE MOUND CASE is a story of political intrigue and zealous prosecution, the latest from true crime author Jim Fisher.

The Other Trail of Tears

The Removal of the Ohio Tribes

Author: Mary Stockwell

Publisher: Westholme Pub Llc

ISBN: 9781594162107

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 9596

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The Story of the Longest and Largest Forced Migration of Native Americans in American History The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was the culmination of the United States’ policy to force native populations to relocate west of the Mississippi River. The most well-known episode in the eviction of American Indians in the East was the notorious “Trail of Tears” along which Southeastern Indians were driven from their homes in Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to reservations in present-day Oklahoma. But the struggle in the South was part of a wider story that reaches back in time to the closing months of the War of 1812, back through many states—most notably Ohio—and into the lives of so many tribes, including the Delaware, Seneca, Shawnee, Ottawa, and Wyandot (Huron). They, too, were forced to depart from their homes in the Ohio Country to Kansas and Oklahoma. The Other Trail of Tears: The Removal of the Ohio Indians by award-winning historian Mary Stockwell tells the story of this region’s historic tribes as they struggled following the death of Tecumseh and the unraveling of his tribal confederacy in 1813. At the peace negotiations in Ghent in 1814, Great Britain was unable to secure a permanent homeland for the tribes in Ohio setting the stage for further treaties with the United States and encroachment by settlers. Over the course of three decades the Ohio Indians were forced to move to the West, with the Wyandot people ceding their last remaining lands in Ohio to the U.S. Government in the early 1850s. The book chronicles the history of Ohio’s Indians and their interactions with settlers and U.S. agents in the years leading up to their official removal, and sheds light on the complexities of the process, with both individual tribes and the United States taking advantage of opportunities at different times. It is also the story of how the native tribes tried to come to terms with the fast pace of change on America’s western frontier and the inevitable loss of their traditional homelands. While the tribes often disagreed with one another, they attempted to move toward the best possible future for all their people against the relentless press of settlers and limited time.