Out of Hitler's Reach-96

Author: Michael Luick-Thrams

Publisher: Iowa State Press

ISBN: 9780912072258

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 9266

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From 1939 to 1943, about 185 refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe found refuge at Scattergood, a temporary hostel in what had been a Quaker boarding school near West Branch, Iowa. This book examines the refugees' backgrounds, their flight from Europe, and their arrival in America.

The 1996 Genealogy Annual

A Bibliography of Published Sources

Author: Thomas Jay Kemp

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780842027403

Category: Reference

Page: 351

View: 7364

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A comprehensive bibliography of the year's genealogies, handbooks, and source materials.

Tap Roots Betrayed

How Our Dreams Got Derailed In America

Author: Michael Luick-Thrams

Publisher: epubli

ISBN: 3737564949

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3324

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Those who first settled the Midwest, the American Heartland, came from “back East” or directly from Europe. Mostly, they had little to lose and everything to gain by risking everything—including their very lives. Still, they came, by the millions, chasing runaway dreams. In the process, they transformed a land occupied for over ten-thousand years by others who lived vastly different lives and now are mostly vanished. In the process, those who supplanted the Native Americans created a radically new culture—one now in decline. The Luick clan—typical of so many pioneering families of the American frontier—came on the run from hunger-wracked Württemberg, having thrashed a noble. After twenty years of carving a life out of the woods of Michigan, they migrated en masse once more—to the prairies of Iowa in the 1850s. Founding a town they named “Belmond,” after pretty settler Emily “Belle” Dumond, the four Luick brothers and their determined sister launched an empire built on land, livestock and banking. The Luicks and their cohorts forged a physical culture—public buildings, social institutions, latest fashion—that largely looked little like the European or Eastern lands they’d left, yet the intangible culture they made in many ways hardly resembled the social culture (laws, local mores and norms) they’d turned their backs on. Tapping the well-documented Luicks as a case study, this book examines a process replicated tens of thousands of times across America—how strangers peopled an annexed land, then built something totally different than had been in that place before. If we explore that process, we might find clues on how we might forge a new culture now, as the one our ancestors erected fails to respond to a changing world order. In their stories, we find larger truths, useable social stencils as well as sobering caveats.

Annals of Iowa

A historical quarterly

Author: Iowa. Division of Historical Museum and Archives,State Historical Society of Iowa,Iowa. Historical Dept

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Iowa

Page: N.A

View: 5440

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A Biography of Lillian and George Willoughby

Twentieth-century Quaker Peace Activists

Author: Gregory Allen Barnes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 321

View: 2581

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A Quaker farm woman and young man raised in the Panama Canal zone joined forces at the University of Iowa in 1939 and set out to make the world more peaceful. Lillian and George Willoughby resettled European refugees in the late 1930s, relocated interned Japanese-Americans when World War II broke out, and served as conscientious objectors during the war. They protested nuclear weapons in the 1950s. They promoted integration of the races, preservation of open spaces, and new ways of communal living. They opposed the Vietnam War and participated in peace walks, one of which reached Moscow. Despite the normal stresses on marital and family life, they worked increasingly as a tem, developing nonviolence training workshops, based on Gandhian principles, which they took to India and other countries in Asia. In the new millennium, they have continued their ministries, and engaged in the new social issues: nonviolent peacekeeping in Central America and Sri Lanka, protection of open spaces, and opposition to the violence of the War on Drugs as well as the real war on Iraq. They participated fully in this, their authorized biography, during a time when Lillian, at 88, faced jail for her antiwar activities.

America, History and Life

Author: Eric H. Boehm

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 7583

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Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.

Roots of Darkness - Volume 1

Our Family's Dreams and Nightmares in America

Author: Michael Luick-Thrams

Publisher: epubli

ISBN: 3737529868

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 1484

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Every family has a skeleton in the closet, but historian-author Michael Luick-Thrams has unearthed an entire cemetery lying beneath his family’s 400-year sojourn in North America. This book—the first in a trilogy—explores the American experience as lived by a “typical” Heartland family, one with deep, gnarled roots reaching back to 1630. In this peerless John-and-Jane-Doe family history, “normal citizens” prove to be most unusual characters. An out-of-luck auto mechanic becomes an affable terrorist. A stressed mom resorts to mass-murder. A butcher turns frontier lawman. A tormented granny pilfers the grandkids’ doll clothes, and a cavalry man thrashes his superiors. And, there’s always the ghost of the philandering near-mute farmer who caused this whole review in the first place. While on the surface a family memoir, Christopher Cory, editor of the Yale Class of ’62 website, notes “This tome offers fresh illumination to classic themes central to America’s formation. In it, Luick-Thrams illustrates the macro through the micro—tales in which all of us, at some point, can see ourselves..” Roots of Darkness is the first in the series Oceans of Darkness, Oceans of Light: Our Troubles and Treasures in the New World, which recounts one family’s improbable journey from Europe to the heart of America and back. Along the way, its members have lived through disasters (“Indian” or a dozen other wars, poverty and hunger, locust as well as bacterial plagues, armed Depression-era rural unrest); and, they have found redemption. A “digital-archive” genre, Oceans is a social history laced with meditations on family and life itself. The Waltons visit Sin City. A clan’s chronicle unlike any you’ve ever read, it both entertains and edifies. It features over 2,000 photos, paintings, posters, journal entries, letters, articles and artifacts related to its main characters. Together, they weave a colorful account of how one family helped shape a continent—and was indelibly shaped by it.

Mr. Smith Went to Washington

From Eisenhower to Clinton

Author: Neal Edward Smith

Publisher: Iowa State Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 440

View: 3434

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Smith's length of service gives him a unique perspective on the presidents he served under, on encounters with major world leaders from Deng Xiaoping to Mikhail Gorbachev to Pope John Paul II, on major events such as the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal, and even on numerous cabinet members and other high-level officials including General Colin Powell. Aided by more than 70 photographs, we join in the Smiths' adventures as they get to know first ladies, Supreme Court justices, and notable figures such as James Michener and Coretta Scott King.

The Pessimist's Guide to History 3e

An Irresistible Compendium of Catastrophes, Barbarities, Massacres, and Mayhem—from 14 Billion Years Ago to 2007

Author: Doris Flexner,Stuart Berg Flexner

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061980250

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 4841

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The classic irreverent look at the past—now updated with even more appalling facts! Fourteen billion or so years ago, the Big Bang exploded—and it's been downhill from there. For every spectacular discovery throughout history, there have been hundreds of devastating epidemics; for every benevolent despot, a thousand like Vlad the Impaler; for every cup half-full, a larger cup half-empty. This enthralling, enlightening, and devilishly entertaining chronicle of disasters and dastardly deeds brings to light the darkest events in history and the most abysmal calamities to strike the planet . . . so far. 88 BC: Mithridates VI Eupator provides an early example of genocide by massacring 100,000 Romans. 1347: Saint Vitus' Dance Epidemic shimmies across Europe like a deadly disco fever, leaving its victims twitching, uncontrollably leaping, and foaming at the mouth. 1888: Jack the Ripper stalks through the dark alleys of Whitechapel, England, turning the world's oldest profession into the world's most dangerous one. 1939: A Swiss chemist wins a Nobel Prize for developing DDT—and the environment gets another nail in the coffin. 2005: Hurricane Katrina devastates the Gulf Coast. In a classic double whammy, the government response also devastates the Gulf Coast. And much, much more!

The Barbed-Wire College

Reeducating German POWs in the United States During World War II

Author: Ron Theodore Robin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400821624

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 4941

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From Stalag 17 to The Manchurian Candidate, the American media have long been fascinated with stories of American prisoners of war. But few Americans are aware that enemy prisoners of war were incarcerated on our own soil during World War II. In The Barbed-Wire College Ron Robin tells the extraordinary story of the 380,000 German prisoners who filled camps from Rhode Island to Wisconsin, Missouri to New Jersey. Using personal narratives, camp newspapers, and military records, Robin re-creates in arresting detail the attempts of prison officials to mold the daily lives and minds of their prisoners. From 1943 onward, and in spite of the Geneva Convention, prisoners were subjected to an ambitious reeducation program designed to turn them into American-style democrats. Under the direction of the Pentagon, liberal arts professors entered over 500 camps nationwide. Deaf to the advice of their professional rivals, the behavioral scientists, these instructors pushed through a program of arts and humanities that stressed only the positive aspects of American society. Aided by German POW collaborators, American educators censored popular books and films in order to promote democratic humanism and downplay class and race issues, materialism, and wartime heroics. Red-baiting Pentagon officials added their contribution to the program, as well; by the war's end, the curriculum was more concerned with combating the appeals of communism than with eradicating the evils of National Socialism. The reeducation officials neglected to account for one factor: an entrenched German military subculture in the camps, complete with a rigid chain of command and a propensity for murdering "traitors." The result of their neglect was utter failure for the reeducation program. By telling the story of the program's rocky existence, however, Ron Robin shows how this intriguing chapter of military history was tied to two crucial episodes of twentieth- century American history: the battle over the future of American education and the McCarthy-era hysterics that awaited postwar America.