The Era of Reconstruction, 1865-1877

Author: Kenneth Milton Stampp

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 039470388X

Category: History

Page: 228

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A review of the controversial period in America which followed the Civil War examining the political situation in the South

An Empire for Slavery

The Peculiar Institution in Texas, 1821--1865

Author: Randolph B. Campbell

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807161713

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6426

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Because Texas emerged from the western frontier relatively late in the formation of the antebellum nation, it is frequently and incorrectly perceived as fundamentally western in its political and social orientation. In fact, most of the settlers of this region were emigrants from the South, and many of these people brought with them their slaves and all aspects of slavery as it had matured in their natives states. In An Empire for Slavery, Randolph B. Campbell examines slavery in the antebellum South's newest state and reveals how central slavery was to Texas history. The "peculiar institution" was perhaps the most important factor in determining the economic development and ideological orientation of the state in the years leading to the Civil War. Campbell points out that although the area of slaveholding in Texas covered only two-fifths of the state by 1860, this area alone was as large as Alabama and Mississippi combined and constituted "a virtual empire for slavery." By the outbreak of the Civil War, the proportion of slaveholders and slaves in Texas was comparable to that of Virginia, the oldest slaveholding state in the Union. Utilizing records such as federal censuses, wills and other probate papers, and the WPA slave narratives, Campbell raises a number of questions concerning the nature of slavery in Texas. What factors encouraged the adoption of slavery? Under what conditions did the Texas slaves exist? What was the societal impact of slavery in this new state? How did the Civil War itself affect slavery in the state? Campbell also reviews the proslavery argument put forward by many early Texas statesmen. What emerges is a picture of a state whose political future was sen as dependent upon the continuance of slavery and whose role in the Civil War was determined by this choice. As a result of this study, Texas is revealed as a state not unlike those of the older South. An Empire for Slavery is the first examination of the "peculiar institution" as it existed in Texas. Historians and general readers alike will find it an essential examination of the region, the period, and the phenomenon of slavery.

The Slave Community

Plantation Life in the Antebellum South

Author: John W. Blassingame

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195025637

Category: Social Science

Page: 414

View: 4137

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Taking into account the major recent studies, this volume presents an updated analysis of the life of the black slave - his African heritage, culture, family, acculturation, behavior, religion, and personality.

Life and Labor in the Old South

Author: Ulrich Bonnell Phillips,John David Smith

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781570036781

Category: History

Page: 375

View: 4959

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A new edition of the germinal social history of the American South

Time on the Cross

The Economics of American Negro Slavery

Author: Robert William Fogel,Stanley L. Engerman

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393312188

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 306

View: 4397

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Employs quantitative analyses to correct long-standing historical beliefs concerning the inefficiency of the slave system, the dispersion of Black families, and the material poverty of slaves

Debating Slavery

Economy and Society in the Antebellum American South

Author: Mark M. Smith,Economic History Society

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521576963

Category: History

Page: 117

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First New Studies in Economic and Social History book on a US theme. Good concise introduction to a 'hot' topic.

New Perspectives on Race and Slavery in America

Essays in Honor of Kenneth M. Stampp

Author: Robert H. Abzug,Stephen E. Maizlish

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813161827

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 4042

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For more than three decades race relations have been at the forefront of historical research in America. These new essays on race and slavery -- some by highly regarded, award-winning veterans in the field and others by talented newcomers -- point in fresh directions. They address specific areas of contention even as together they survey important questions across four centuries of social, cultural, and political history.Looking at the institution itself, Robert McColley reconsiders the origins of black slavery in America, while William W. Freehling presents a striking interpretation of the Denmark Vesey slave conspiracy of 1822. In the political arena, William E. Gienapp and Stephen E. Maizlish assess the power of race and slave issues in, respectively, the Republican and Democratic parties of the 1850s. For the Civil War and Reconstruction eras, Reid Mitchell profiles the consciousness of the average Confederate soldier, while Leon F. Litwack explores the tasks facing freed slaves. Arthur Zilversmit switches the perspective to Washington with a reevaluation of Grant's commitments to the freedmen. Essays on the twentieth century focus on the South. James Oakes traces the rising fortunes of the supposedly vanquished planter class as it entered this century. Moving to more recent times, John G. Sproat looks at the role of South Carolina's white moderates during the struggle over segregation in the late 1950s and early 1960s and their failure at Orangeburg in 1968. Finally, Joel Williamson assesses what the loss of slavery has meant to southern culture in the 120 years since the end of the Civil War. A wide-ranging yet cohesive exploration, New Perspectives on Race and Slavery in America takes on added significance as a volume that honors Kenneth M. Stampp, the mentor of all the authors and long considered one of the great modern pioneers in the history of slavery and the Civil War.

The Political Economy of Slavery

Studies in the Economy and Society of the Slave South

Author: Eugene D. Genovese

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819575275

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 5832

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A stimulating analysis of the society and economy in the slave south.

Poor White (Unabridged)

Author: Sherwood Anderson

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 8074843734

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 220

View: 2435

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This carefully crafted ebook: "Poor White (Unabridged)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Sherwood Anderson's Poor White captures the spirit of small-town America during the Machine Age. A lonely and passionate inventor of farm machinery, Hugh McVey, who rises from poverty on the bank of the Mississippi River, struggles to gain love and intimacy in a community where "life had surrendered to the machine." Through his story Anderson aims his criticism at the rise of technology and industry at the turn of the century. Simultaneously, he renders a tale of eloquent naturalism and disturbing beauty. Poor White was praised by such writers as H. L. Mencken and Hart Crane when it was first published in 1920. It remains a curiously contemporary novel, and a marvelous testament to Sherwood Anderson's "sombre metaphysical preoccupation and his smouldering sensuousness". Sherwood Anderson (1876 – 1941) was an American novelist and short story writer, known for subjective and self-revealing works. Anderson published several short story collections, novels, memoirs, books of essays, and a book of poetry. He may be most influential for his effect on the next generation of young writers, as he inspired William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Thomas Wolfe.

My Brother Slaves

Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South

Author: Sergio A. Lussana

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813166969

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 6836

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Trapped in a world of brutal physical punishment and unremitting, back-breaking labor, Frederick Douglass mused that it was the friendships he shared with other enslaved men that carried him through his darkest days. In this pioneering study, Sergio A. Lussana offers the first in-depth investigation of the social dynamics between enslaved men and examines how individuals living under the conditions of bondage negotiated masculine identities. He demonstrates that African American men worked to create their own culture through a range of recreational pursuits similar to those enjoyed by their white counterparts, such as drinking, gambling, fighting, and hunting. Underscoring the enslaved men's relationships, however, were the sex-segregated work gangs on the plantations, which further reinforced their social bonds. Lussana also addresses male resistance to slavery by shifting attention from the visible, organized world of slave rebellion to the private realms of enslaved men's lives. He reveals how these men developed an oppositional community in defiance of the regulations of the slaveholder and shows that their efforts were intrinsically linked to forms of resistance on a larger scale. The trust inherent in these private relationships was essential in driving conversations about revolution. My Brother Slaves fills a vital gap in our contemporary understanding of southern history and of the effects that the South's peculiar institution had on social structures and gender expression. Employing detailed research that draws on autobiographies of and interviews with former slaves, Lussana's work artfully testifies to the importance of social relationships between enslaved men and the degree to which these fraternal bonds encouraged them to resist.

Slaves in the Family

Author: Edward Ball

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 146689749X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 9593

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Fifteen years after its hardcover debut, the FSG Classics reissue of the celebrated work of narrative nonfiction that won the National Book Award and changed the American conversation about race, with a new preface by the author The Ball family hails from South Carolina—Charleston and thereabouts. Their plantations were among the oldest and longest-standing plantations in the South. Between 1698 and 1865, close to four thousand black people were born into slavery under the Balls or were bought by them. In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball recounts his efforts to track down and meet the descendants of his family's slaves. Part historical narrative, part oral history, part personal story of investigation and catharsis, Slaves in the Family is, in the words of Pat Conroy, "a work of breathtaking generosity and courage, a magnificent study of the complexity and strangeness and beauty of the word ‘family.'"

Born in Bondage

Growing Up Enslaved in the Antebellum South

Author: Marie Jenkins Schwartz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674043343

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 985

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Each time a child was born in bondage, the system of slavery began anew. Although raised by their parents or by surrogates in the slave community, children were ultimately subject to the rule of their owners. Following the life cycle of a child from birth through youth to young adulthood, Marie Jenkins Schwartz explores the daunting world of slave children, a world governed by the dual authority of parent and owner, each with conflicting agendas. Despite the constant threats of separation and the necessity of submission to the slaveowner, slave families managed to pass on essential lessons about enduring bondage with human dignity. Schwartz counters the commonly held vision of the paternalistic slaveholder who determines the life and welfare of his passive chattel, showing instead how slaves struggled to give their children a sense of self and belonging that denied the owner complete control. "Born in Bondage" gives us an unsurpassed look at what it meant to grow up as a slave in the antebellum South. Schwartz recreates the experiences of these bound but resilient young people as they learned to negotiate between acts of submission and selfhood, between the worlds of commodity and community.

Women's Work, Men's Work

The Informal Slave Economies of Lowcountry Georgia

Author: Betty Wood

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820316673

Category: History

Page: 247

View: 1089

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In Women's Work, Men's Work, Betty Wood examines the struggle of bondpeople to secure and retain for themselves recognized rights as producers and consumers in the context of the brutal, formal slave economy sanctified by law. Wood examines this struggle in the Georgia lowcountry over a period of eighty years, from the 1750s to the 1830s, when, she argues, the evolution of the system of informal slave economies had reached the point that it would henceforth dominate Savannah's political agenda until the Civil War and emancipation. The daily battles of bondpeople to secure rights as producers and consumers reflected and reinforced the integrity of the private lives they were determined to fashion for themselves, Wood posits. Their families formed the essential base upon which, and for which, they organized their informal economies. An expanding market in Savannah provided opportunities for them to negotiate terms for the sale of their labor and produce, and for them to purchase the goods and services they sought. In considering the quasi-autonomous economic activities of bondpeople, Wood outlines the equally significant, but quite different, roles of bondwomen and bondmen in organizing these economies. She also analyzes the influence of evangelical Protestant Christianity on bondpeople, and the effects of the fusion of religious and economic morality on their circumstances. For a combination of practical and religious reasons, Wood finds, informal slave economies, with their impact on whites, became the single most important issue in Savannah politics. She contends that, by the 1820s, bondpeople were instrumental in defining the political agenda of a divided city--a significant, if unintentional, achievement.

Medicine and Slavery

The Diseases and Health Care of Blacks in Antebellum Virginia

Author: Todd L. Savitt

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252008740

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 7118

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A detailed analysis of the occurrence of disease and the quality of medical care in antebellum Virginia focuses on the treatment of Black slaves and freemen

Deliver Us from Evil

The Slavery Question in the Old South

Author: Lacy K. Ford

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199723036

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3169

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A major contribution to our understanding of slavery in the early republic, Deliver Us from Evil illuminates the white South's twisted and tortured efforts to justify slavery, focusing on the period from the drafting of the federal constitution in 1787 through the age of Jackson. Drawing heavily on primary sources, including newspapers, government documents, legislative records, pamphlets, and speeches, Lacy K. Ford recaptures the varied and sometimes contradictory ideas and attitudes held by groups of white southerners as they tried to square slavery with their democratic ideals. He excels at conveying the political, intellectual, economic, and social thought of leading white southerners, vividly recreating the mental world of the varied actors and capturing the vigorous debates over slavery. He also shows that there was not one antebellum South but many, and not one southern white mindset but several, with the debates over slavery in the upper South quite different in substance from those in the deep South. In the upper South, where tobacco had fallen into comparative decline by 1800, debate often centered on how the area might reduce its dependence on slave labor and "whiten" itself, whether through gradual emancipation and colonization or the sale of slaves to the cotton South. During the same years, the lower South swirled into the vortex of the "cotton revolution," and that area's whites lost all interest in emancipation, no matter how gradual or fully compensated. An ambitious, thought-provoking, and highly insightful book, Deliver Us from Evil makes an important contribution to the history of slavery in the United States, shedding needed light on the white South's early struggle to reconcile slavery with its Revolutionary heritage.