Revolution and State in Modern Mexico

The Political Economy of Uneven Development

Author: Adam David Morton

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442229454

Category: Political Science

Page: 346

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Now in an updated edition, this groundbreaking study develops a new approach to understanding the formation of the postrevolutionary state in Mexico. Adam David Morton links the rise and demise of the modern Mexican state to ongoing forms of class struggle that have shaped and restructured state and civil society. He thus sheds valuable interdisciplinary light on debates on state formation by recovering radical tools of analysis, such as uneven development and class struggle, for the wider study of past and present politics in Mexico and, more broadly, Latin America. A substantive new epilogue engages the main theoretical debates that have emerged since the book was first published while also exploring the dominant geographies of power and resistance that are shaping state space in Mexico in the twenty-first century.

Everyday Forms of State Formation

Revolution and the Negotiation of Rule in Modern Mexico

Author: Gilbert Michael Joseph,Daniel Nugent

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822314677

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 1966

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Everyday Forms of State Formation is the first book to systematically examine the relationship between popular cultures and state formation in revolutionary and post-revolutionary Mexico. While most accounts have emphasized either the role of peasants and peasant rebellions or that of state formation in Mexico’s past, these original essays reveal the state’s day-to-day engagement with grassroots society by examining popular cultures and forms of the state simultaneously and in relation to one another. Structured in the form of a dialogue between a distinguished array of Mexicanists and comparative social theorists, this volume boldly reassesses past analyses of the Mexican revolution and suggests new directions for future study. Showcasing a wealth of original archival and ethnographic research, this collection provides a new and deeper understanding of Mexico’s revolutionary experience. It also speaks more broadly to a problem of extraordinary contemporary relevance: the manner in which local societies and self-proclaimed "revolutionary" states are articulated historically. The result is a unique collection bridging social history, anthropology, historical sociology, and cultural studies in its formulation of new approaches for rethinking the multifaceted relationship between power, culture, and resistance. Contributors. Ana María Alonso, Armando Bartra, Marjorie Becker, Barry Carr, Philip Corrigan, Romana Falcón, Gilbert M. Joseph, Alan Knight, Florencia E. Mallon, Daniel Nugent, Elsie Rockwell, William Roseberry, Jan Rus, Derek Sayer, James C. Scott

Sex in Revolution

Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico

Author: Mary Kay Vaughan,Gabriela Cano,Jocelyn H. Olcott

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822388448

Category: Social Science

Page: 331

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Sex in Revolution challenges the prevailing narratives of the Mexican Revolution and postrevolutionary state formation by placing women at center stage. Bringing to bear decades of feminist scholarship and cultural approaches to Mexican history, the essays in this book demonstrate how women seized opportunities created by modernization efforts and revolutionary upheaval to challenge conventions of sexuality, work, family life, religious practices, and civil rights. Concentrating on episodes and phenomena that occurred between 1915 and 1950, the contributors deftly render experiences ranging from those of a transgendered Zapatista soldier to upright damas católicas and Mexico City’s chicas modernas pilloried by the press and male students. Women refashioned their lives by seeking relief from bad marriages through divorce courts and preparing for new employment opportunities through vocational education. Activists ranging from Catholics to Communists mobilized for political and social rights. Although forced to compromise in the face of fierce opposition, these women made an indelible imprint on postrevolutionary society. These essays illuminate emerging practices of femininity and masculinity, stressing the formation of subjectivity through civil-society mobilizations, spectatorship and entertainment, and locales such as workplaces, schools, churches, and homes. The volume’s epilogue examines how second-wave feminism catalyzed this revolutionary legacy, sparking widespread, more radically egalitarian rural women’s organizing in the wake of late-twentieth-century democratization campaigns. The conclusion considers the Mexican experience alongside those of other postrevolutionary societies, offering a critical comparative perspective. Contributors. Ann S. Blum, Kristina A. Boylan, Gabriela Cano, María Teresa Fernández Aceves, Heather Fowler-Salamini, Susan Gauss, Temma Kaplan, Carlos Monsiváis, Jocelyn Olcott, Anne Rubenstein, Patience Schell, Stephanie Smith, Lynn Stephen, Julia Tuñón, Mary Kay Vaughan

Criminal and Citizen in Modern Mexico

Author: Robert Buffington

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803261594

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

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Criminal and Citizen in Modern Mexico explores elite notions of crime and criminality from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. In Mexico these notions represented contested areas of the social terrain, places where generalized ideas about criminality transcended the individual criminal act to intersect with larger issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality. It was at this intersection that modern Mexican society bared its soul. Attitudes toward race amalgamation and indios, lower-class lifestyles and läperos, women and sexual deviance, all influenced perceptions of criminality and ultimately determined the fundamental issue of citizenship: who belonged and who did not. The liberal discourse of toleration and human rights, the positivist discourse of order and progress, the revolutionary discourse of social justice and integration sought in turn to disguise the exclusions of modern Mexican society behind a veil of criminality?to proscribe as criminal those activities that criminologists, penologists, and anthropologists clearly linked to marginalized social groups. This book attempts to lift that veil and to gaze, like Josä Guadalupe Posada, at the grinning calavera that it shields.

Architecture as Revolution

Episodes in the History of Modern Mexico

Author: Luis E. Carranza

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292721951

Category: Architecture

Page: 241

View: 1927

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The period following the Mexican Revolution was characterized by unprecedented artistic experimentation. Seeking to express the revolution's heterogeneous social and political aims, which were in a continuous state of redefinition, architects, artists, writers, and intellectuals created distinctive, sometimes idiosyncratic theories and works. Luis E. Carranza examines the interdependence of modern architecture in Mexico and the pressing sociopolitical and ideological issues of this period, as well as the interchanges between post-revolutionary architects and the literary, philosophical, and artistic avant-gardes. Organizing his book around chronological case studies that show how architectural theory and production reflected various understandings of the revolution's significance, Carranza focuses on architecture and its relationship to the philosophical and pedagogic requirements of the muralist movement, the development of the avant-garde in Mexico and its notions of the Mexican city, the use of pre-Hispanic architectural forms to address indigenous peoples, the development of a socially oriented architectural functionalism, and the monumentalization of the revolution itself. In addition, the book also covers important architects and artists who have been marginally discussed within architectural and art historiography. Richly illustrated, Architecture as Revolution is one of the first books in English to present a social and cultural history of early twentieth-century Mexican architecture.

Political Intelligence and the Creation of Modern Mexico, 1938-1954

Author: Aaron W. Navarro

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271037059

Category: History

Page: 301

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"Analyzes the impact of the opposition candidacies in the Mexican presidential elections of 1940, 1946, and 1952 on the internal discipline and electoral dominance of the ruling Partido de la Revoluciâon Mexicana (PRM) and its successor, the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI)"--Provided by publisher.

Forced Marches

Soldiers and Military Caciques in Modern Mexico

Author: Ben Fallaw,Terry Rugeley

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816520429

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 1119

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Forced Marches is a collection of innovative essays that analyze the influence of the military and militias in the century that followed Mexican independence. Contributors from the U.S. and the U.K. employ the “new military history” to engage with recent scholarship on the early national period, the Reform, the Porfiriato, and the Revolution.

Myths of Demilitarization in Postrevolutionary Mexico, 1920-1960

Author: Thomas Rath

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608359

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 4896

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At the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920, Mexico's large, rebellious army dominated national politics. By the 1940s, Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) was led by a civilian president and claimed to have depoliticized the army and achieved the bloodless pacification of the Mexican countryside through land reform, schooling, and indigenismo. However, historian Thomas Rath argues, Mexico's celebrated demilitarization was more protracted, conflict-ridden, and incomplete than most accounts assume. Civilian governments deployed troops as a police force, often aimed at political suppression, while officers meddled in provincial politics, engaged in corruption, and crafted official history, all against a backdrop of sustained popular protest and debate. Using newly available materials from military, intelligence, and diplomatic archives, Rath weaves together an analysis of national and regional politics, military education, conscription, veteran policy, and popular protest. In doing so, he challenges dominant interpretations of successful, top-down demilitarization and questions the image of the post-1940 PRI regime as strong, stable, and legitimate. Rath also shows how the army's suppression of students and guerrillas in the 1960s and 1970s and the more recent militarization of policing have long roots in Mexican history.

Cultural Politics in Revolution

Teachers, Peasants, and Schools in Mexico, 1930-1940

Author: Mary K. Vaughan

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816516766

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 9647

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"Innovative study of the cultural legacy of the Mexican Revolution, using the story of rural schools. Focuses on Puebla and Sonora and the attempt by the central government to implement socialist education and to advance its nationalist agenda. Stresses the importance of negotiation among national and local leaders, teachers and peasants"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

The Mestizo State

Reading Race in Modern Mexico

Author: Joshua Lund

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816656363

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 217

View: 5520

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The wide-ranging relations between race and cultural production in modern Mexico

Fragments of a Golden Age

The Politics of Culture in Mexico Since 1940

Author: Gilbert M. Joseph,Anne Rubenstein,Eric Zolov

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822383128

Category: History

Page: 526

View: 4642

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During the twentieth century the Mexican government invested in the creation and promotion of a national culture more aggressively than any other state in the western hemisphere. Fragments of a Golden Age provides a comprehensive cultural history of the vibrant Mexico that emerged after 1940. Agreeing that the politics of culture and its production, dissemination, and reception constitute one of the keys to understanding this period of Mexican history, the volume’s contributors—historians, popular writers, anthropologists, artists, and cultural critics—weigh in on a wealth of topics from music, tourism, television, and sports to theatre, unions, art, and magazines. Each essay in its own way addresses the fragmentation of a cultural consensus that prevailed during the “golden age” of post–revolutionary prosperity, a time when the state was still successfully bolstering its power with narratives of modernization and shared community. Combining detailed case studies—both urban and rural—with larger discussions of political, economic, and cultural phenomena, the contributors take on such topics as the golden age of Mexican cinema, the death of Pedro Infante as a political spectacle, the 1951 “caravan of hunger,” professional wrestling, rock music, and soap operas. Fragments of a Golden Age will fill a particular gap for students of modern Mexico, Latin American studies, cultural studies, political economy, and twentieth century history, as well as to others concerned with rethinking the cultural dimensions of nationalism, imperialism, and modernization. Contributors. Steven J. Bachelor, Quetzil E. Castañeda, Seth Fein, Alison Greene, Omar Hernández, Jis & Trino, Gilbert M. Joseph, Heather Levi, Rubén Martínez, Emile McAnany, John Mraz, Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Elena Poniatowska, Anne Rubenstein, Alex Saragoza, Arthur Schmidt, Mary Kay Vaughan, Eric Zolov

State and Society in Spanish America During the Age of Revolution

Author: Victor Uribe Uran

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780842028745

Category: History

Page: 261

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State and Society in Spanish America during the Age of Revolution calls into question the orthodox split of Latin American history into colonial and modern, arguing that this split obscures significant economic, social, and even political continuities from 1780 to 1850. In addition, the book argues that the colonial-modern division makes it difficult to appraise historical changes in a comprehensive way. The book covers an unconventional period-1750 to 1850-and looks at the continuities over this longer, more comprehensive timespan. The essays discuss late colonial and postcolonial developments in gender, racial, class, and cultural relations across Latin America and in specific regions, including Mexico, Colombia, Argentina, and Chile. By bridging these two eras and looking at the "Age of Democratic Revolution" as a whole, the book allows readers to see the coming of Latin America's struggle for independence from Spain and Portugal and the changes after independence. Written by established Latin American scholars as well as up-and-coming historians, these essays are published in this volume for the first time. This book is ideal for courses on Latin American history, including colonial history, national history, and the "Age of Revolution."

Emergence of the modern Mexican woman

her participation in revolution and struggle for equality, 1910-1940

Author: Shirlene Ann Soto

Publisher: Arden Press Inc.

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 199

View: 9718

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The Emergence of the Modern Mexican Woman is the first book in English on women's participation in the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940) and the Mexican women's rights movement during this thirty-year period. The work is based on extensive research at libraries in Mexico and the United States and on the author's personal interviews with some of the few women alive today who participated in the revolution and with family members and friends of those who are deceased.

Yankee Don't Go Home!

Mexican Nationalism, American Business Culture, and the Shaping of Modern Mexico, 1920-1950

Author: Julio Moreno

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807854785

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 4344

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In the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, Mexican and U.S. political leaders, business executives, and ordinary citizens shaped modern Mexico by making industrial capitalism the key to upward mobility into the middle class, material prosperity, and

A Companion to Latin American History

Author: Thomas H. Holloway

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444391640

Category: History

Page: 544

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The Companion to Latin American History collects the work of leading experts in the field to create a single-source overview of the diverse history and current trends in the study of Latin America. Presents a state-of-the-art overview of the history of Latin America Written by the top international experts in the field 28 chapters come together as a superlative single source of information for scholars and students Recognizes the breadth and diversity of Latin American history by providing systematic chronological and geographical coverage Covers both historical trends and new areas of interest

From Revolution to Reform

A Comparative Study of China and Mexico

Author: He Li

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761827580

Category: History

Page: 199

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In From Revolution to Reform, He Li examines political and economic transformation in China and Mexico, from the Mexican and Chinese revolutions at the beginning of the 20th century, to economic reforms and political liberalization in recent decades. Li also explores lessons that other developing countries could learn from the experiences of China and Mexico.

Revolution and Ideology

Images of the Mexican Revolution in the United States

Author: John A. Britton

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813118963

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 2382

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Mexico and the United States share a border of more than 2,000 miles, and their histories and interests have often intertwined. The Mexican Revolution, which began in 1910 and continued in one form or another for the next forty years, was keenly observed by U.S. citizens, especially those who were directly involved in Mexico through property ownership, investment, missionary work, tourism, journalism, and education. Historian John A. Britton examines contemporary accounts written by Americans commenting on fifty years of social upheaval south of the border. The Mexican revolution differed from many others in this century in that Marxist-Leninist theory was only one of many radical and reformist influences. With the recent collapse of communist regimes, historians and political scientists are looking at Mexico today with renewed interest in its mostly nonideological revolution. Britton draws on accounts of cultural, business, and political leaders as well as journalists and academics. Radical journalist John Reed, novelists Katherine Anne Porter and D.H. Lawrence, social critics Stuart Chase and Waldo Frank, and banker-diplomat Dwight Morrow are among the best known commentators. Radical writers John Kenneth Turner and Carleton Beals, academics Herbert I. Priestley and Frank Tannenbaum, and Communists Bertram Wolfe and Joseph Freeman bring their unique points of view to bear on Mexican political events.

Rural Revolt in Mexico

U.S. Intervention and the Domain of Subaltern Politics

Author: Daniel Nugent

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822382482

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 8154

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Rural Revolt in Mexico is a historical investigation of how subaltern political activity engages imperialism, capitalism, and the United States. In this volume, Daniel Nugent has gathered a group of leading scholars whose work examines the relationship of revolts by peasants and Indians in Mexico to the past century of U.S. intervention—from the rural rebellions of the 1840s through the 1910 revolution to the 1994 uprising in Chiapas. Through their studies of social movements and popular mobilization in the Mexican countryside, the contributors argue for understanding rural revolts in terms of the specific historical contexts of particular regions and peoples, as well as the broader context of unequal cultural, political, and economic relations between Mexico and the United States. Exploring the connections between external and internal factors in social movements, these essays reveal the wide range of organized efforts through which peasants and Indians have struggled to shape their own destiny while confronted by the influence of U.S. capital and military might. Originally published as a limited edition in 1988 by the Center for U. S.–Mexican Studies, this volume presents a pioneering effort by Latin Americanist scholars to sympathetically embrace and enrich work begun in Subaltern Studies between 1982 and 1987 by projecting it onto a different region of historical experience. This revised and expanded edition includes a new introduction by Daniel Nugent and an extensive essay by Adolfo Gilly on the recent Chiapas uprising.

Darfur

Colonial Violence, Sultanic Legacies and Local Politics, 1916-1956

Author: Chris Vaughan

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 184701111X

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 9236

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The first in-depth account of Darfur's history during the Anglo-Egyptian Condominium (from 1916).

Crafting Mexico

Intellectuals, Artisans, and the State after the Revolution

Author: Rick A. López

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822391732

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 780

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After Mexico’s revolution of 1910–1920, intellectuals sought to forge a unified cultural nation out of the country’s diverse populace. Their efforts resulted in an “ethnicized” interpretation of Mexicanness that intentionally incorporated elements of folk and indigenous culture. In this rich history, Rick A. López explains how thinkers and artists, including the anthropologist Manuel Gamio, the composer Carlos Chávez, the educator Moisés Sáenz, the painter Diego Rivera, and many less-known figures, formulated and promoted a notion of nationhood in which previously denigrated vernacular arts—dance, music, and handicrafts such as textiles, basketry, ceramics, wooden toys, and ritual masks—came to be seen as symbolic of Mexico’s modernity and national distinctiveness. López examines how the nationalist project intersected with transnational intellectual and artistic currents, as well as how it was adapted in rural communities. He provides an in-depth account of artisanal practices in the village of Olinalá, located in the mountainous southern state of Guerrero. Since the 1920s, Olinalá has been renowned for its lacquered boxes and gourds, which have been considered to be among the “most Mexican” of the nation’s arts. Crafting Mexico illuminates the role of cultural politics and visual production in Mexico’s transformation from a regionally and culturally fragmented country into a modern nation-state with an inclusive and compelling national identity.