Salonica, City of Ghosts

Christians, Muslims and Jews 1430-1950

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307427579

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 1459

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Salonica, located in northern Greece, was long a fascinating crossroads metropolis of different religions and ethnicities, where Egyptian merchants, Spanish Jews, Orthodox Greeks, Sufi dervishes, and Albanian brigands all rubbed shoulders. Tensions sometimes flared, but tolerance largely prevailed until the twentieth century when the Greek army marched in, Muslims were forced out, and the Nazis deported and killed the Jews. As the acclaimed historian Mark Mazower follows the city’s inhabitants through plague, invasion, famine, and the disastrous twentieth century, he resurrects a fascinating and vanished world. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Greece--a Jewish History

Author: K. E. Fleming

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691146126

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4940

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K. E. Fleming's Greece--a Jewish History is the first comprehensive English-language history of Greek Jews, and the only history that includes material on their diaspora in Israel and the United States. The book tells the story of a people who for the most part no longer exist and whose identity is a paradox in that it wasn't fully formed until after most Greek Jews had emigrated or been deported and killed by the Nazis. For centuries, Jews lived in areas that are now part of Greece. But Greek Jews as a nationalized group existed in substantial number only for a few short decades--from the Balkan Wars (1912-13) until the Holocaust, in which more than 80 percent were killed. Greece--a Jewish History describes their diverse histories and the processes that worked to make them emerge as a Greek collective. It also follows Jews as they left Greece--as deportees to Auschwitz or émigrés to Palestine/Israel and New York's Lower East Side. In such foreign settings their Greekness was emphasized as it never was in Greece, where Orthodox Christianity traditionally defines national identity and anti-Semitism remains common.

Salonica, City of Ghosts

Christians, Muslims and Jews 1430-1950

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780375727382

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 2073

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Salonica, located in northern Greece, was long a fascinating crossroads metropolis of different religions and ethnicities, where Egyptian merchants, Spanish Jews, Orthodox Greeks, Sufi dervishes, and Albanian brigands all rubbed shoulders. Tensions sometimes flared, but tolerance largely prevailed until the twentieth century when the Greek army marched in, Muslims were forced out, and the Nazis deported and killed the Jews. As the acclaimed historian Mark Mazower follows the city’s inhabitants through plague, invasion, famine, and the disastrous twentieth century, he resurrects a fascinating and vanished world. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Jewish Voice from Ottoman Salonica

The Ladino Memoir of Sa'adi Besalel a-Levi

Author: Aron Rodrigue,Sarah Abrevaya Stein

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 080478177X

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 5160

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This book presents for the first time the complete text of the earliest known Ladino-language memoir, transliterated from the original script, translated into English, and introduced and explicated by the editors. The memoirist, Sa'adi Besalel a-Levi (1820–1903), wrote about Ottoman Jews' daily life at a time when the finely wrought fabric of Ottoman society was just beginning to unravel. His vivid portrayal of life in Salonica, a major port in the Ottoman Levant with a majority Jewish population, thus provides a unique window into a way of life before it disappeared as a result of profound political and social changes and the World Wars. Sa'adi was a prominent journalist and publisher, one of the most significant creators of modern Sephardic print culture. He was also a rebel who accused the Jewish leadership of Salonica of being corrupt, abusive, and fanatical; that leadership, in turn, excommunicated him from the Jewish community. The experience of excommunication pervades Sa'adi's memoir, which documents a world that its author was himself actively involved in changing.

Inside Hitler's Greece

The Experience of Occupation, 1941-44

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300089233

Category: History

Page: 437

View: 1316

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Archival materials and first-hand accounts create an insightful study of the impact of the Nazi occupation of Greece on the lives, psyches, and values of ordinary people.

What You Did Not Tell

A Russian Past and the Journey Home

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590519078

Category: Historians

Page: 379

View: 6723

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Uncovering their remarkable and moving stories, Mark Mazower recounts the sacrifices and silences that marked a generation and their descendants. In the centenary of the Russian Revolution, What You Did Not Tell revitalises the history of a socialism erased from memory - humanistic, impassioned, and broad-ranging in its sympathies. But it is also an exploration of the unexpected happiness that may await history's losers, of the power of friendship and the love of place that made his father at home in an England that no longer exists.

Jews, Turks, Ottomans

A Shared History, Fifteenth Through the Twentieth Century

Author: Avigdor Levy

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815629412

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 1277

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Offering a penetrating view of Jewish society and culture, the essays in this volume shed light on a little-known chapter of Jewish history. Written by scholars from Israel, Turkey, Europe and the United States, it presents a broad historical canvas that brings together different perspectives and viewpoints. Its contents include essays on: the foundations of Ottaman-jewish cooperation; Rabbinic literature in the late Byzantine and early Ottoman periods; Jewish contributions to Ottoman medicine between 1450 and 1800; and Jewish female education in the Ottoman Empire between 1840 and 1914.

Jewish Salonica

Between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece

Author: Devin E. Naar

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503600092

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 2532

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Touted as the "Jerusalem of the Balkans," the Mediterranean port city of Salonica (Thessaloniki) was once home to the largest Sephardic Jewish community in the world. The collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the city's incorporation into Greece in 1912 provoked a major upheaval that compelled Salonica's Jews to reimagine their community and status as citizens of a nation-state. Jewish Salonica is the first book to tell the story of this tumultuous transition through the voices and perspectives of Salonican Jews as they forged a new place for themselves in Greek society. Devin E. Naar traveled the globe, from New York to Salonica, Jerusalem, and Moscow, to excavate archives once confiscated by the Nazis. Written in Ladino, Greek, French, and Hebrew, these archives, combined with local newspapers, reveal how Salonica's Jews fashioned a new hybrid identity as Hellenic Jews during a period marked by rising nationalism and economic crisis as well as unprecedented Jewish cultural and political vibrancy. Salonica's Jews—Zionists, assimilationists, and socialists—reinvigorated their connection to the city and claimed it as their own until the Holocaust. Through the case of Salonica's Jews, Naar recovers the diverse experiences of a lost religious, linguistic, and national minority at the crossroads of Europe and the Middle East.

Plumes

Ostrich Feathers, Jews, and a Lost World of Global Commerce

Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300142854

Category: Art

Page: 244

View: 4542

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From Yiddish-speaking Russian-Lithuanian feather handlers in South Africa to London manufacturers and wholesalers, from New York's Lower East Side to entrepreneurial farms in the American West, this text explores the details of a remarkably vibrant yet ephemeral culture.

After the War was Over

Reconstructing the Family, Nation, and State in Greece, 1943-1960

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691058429

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1075

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This volume makes available some of the most exciting research currently underway into Greek society after Liberation. Together, its essays map a new social history of Greece in the 1940s and 1950s, a period in which the country grappled--bloodily--with foreign occupation and intense civil conflict. Extending innovative historical approaches to Greece, the contributors explore how war and civil war affected the family, the law, and the state. They examine how people led their lives, as communities and individuals, at a time of political polarization in a country on the front line of the Cold War's division of Europe. And they advance the ongoing reassessment of what happened in postwar Europe by including regional and village histories and by examining long-running issues of nationalism and ethnicity. Previously neglected subjects--from children and women in the resistance and in prisons to the state use of pageantry--yield fresh insights. By focusing on episodes such as the problems of Jewish survivors in Salonika, memories of the Bulgarian occupation of northern Greece, and the controversial arrest of a war criminal, these scholars begin to answer persistent questions about war and its repercussions. How do people respond to repression? How deep are ethnic divisions? Which forms of power emerge under a weakened state? When forced to choose, will parents sacrifice family or ideology? How do ordinary people surmount wartime grievances to live together? In addition to the editor, the contributors are Eleni Haidia, Procopis Papastratis, Polymeris Voglis, Mando Dalianis, Tassoula Vervenioti, Riki van Boeschoten, John Sakkas, Lee Sarafis, Stathis N. Kalyvas, Anastasia Karakasidou, Bea Lefkowicz, Xanthippi Kotzageorgi-Zymari, Tassos Hadjianastassiou, and Susanne-Sophia Spiliotis.

Streetlife: The Untold History of Europe's Twentieth Century

Author: Leif Jerram

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191501182

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 7096

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The twentieth century in Europe was an urban century: it was shaped by life in, and the view from, the street. Women were not liberated in legislatures, but liberated themselves in factories, homes, nightclubs, and shops. Lenin, Hitler, and Mussolini made themselves powerful by making cities ungovernable with riots rampaging through streets, bars occupied one-by-one. New forms of privacy and isolation were not simply a by-product of prosperity, but because people planned new ways of living, new forms of housing in suburbs and estates across the continent. Our proudest cultural achievements lie not in our galleries or state theatres, but in our suburban TV sets, the dance halls, pop music played in garages, and hip hop sung on our estates. In Streetlife, Leif Jerram presents a totally new history of the twentieth century, with the city at its heart, showing how everything distinctive about the century, from revolution and dictatorship to sexual liberation, was fundamentally shaped by the great urban centres which defined it.

The Ottoman City Between East and West

Aleppo, Izmir, and Istanbul

Author: Edhem Eldem,Daniel Goffman,Bruce Masters

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521643047

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 9110

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A pioneering challenge to the orientalist perception of the Islamic city.

Paris Dreams, Paris Memories

The City and Its Mystique

Author: Charles Rearick

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804777519

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 4089

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How did Paris become the world favorite it is today? Charles Rearick argues that we can best understand Paris as several cities in one, each with its own history and its own imaginary shaped by dream and memory. Paris has long been at once a cosmopolitan City of Light and of modernity, a patchwork of time-resistant villages, a treasured heirloom, a hell for the disinherited, and a legendary pleasure dome. Each of these has played a part in making the enchanting, flawed city of our time. Focusing on the last century and a half, Paris Dreams, Paris Memories makes contemporary Paris understandable. It tells of renewal projects radically transforming neighborhoods and of counter-measures taken to perpetuate the city's historic character and soul. It provides a historically grounded look at the troubled suburbs, barren of monuments and memories, a dumping ground for unwanted industries and people. Further, it tests long-standing characterizations of Paris's uniqueness through comparisons with such rivals as London and Berlin. Paris Dreams, Paris Memories shows that in myriad forms—buildings, monuments, festivities, and artistic portrayals—contemporary Paris gives new life to visions of the city long etched in Parisian imaginations.

Maistre: Considerations on France

Author: Joseph de Maistre,Richard A. Lebrun,Isaiah Berlin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521466288

Category: History

Page: 132

View: 4633

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Joseph de Maistre's Considerations on France (1797) is the best known French equivalent of Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France. The work of the self-exiled Maistre presents a providential interpretation of the French Revolution and argues for a new alliance of throne and altar under a restored Bourbon monarchy. Although Maistre's influence within France was delayed until the Restoration, he is now acknowledged as the most eloquent spokesperson for continental conservatism. This edition features an Introduction by Isaiah Berlin.

The Balkans

A Short History

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307431967

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6362

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Throughout history, the Balkans have been a crossroads, a zone of endless military, cultural and economic mixing and clashing between Europe and Asia, Christianity and Islam, Catholicism and Orthodoxy. Subject to violent shifts of borders, rulers and belief systems at the hands of the world's great empires--from the Byzantine to the Habsburg and Ottoman--the Balkans are often called Europe's tinderbox and a seething cauldron of ethnic and religious resentments. Much has been made of the Balkans' deeply rooted enmities. The recent destruction of the former Yugoslavia was widely ascribed to millennial hatreds frozen by the Cold War and unleashed with the fall of communism. In this brilliant account, acclaimed historian Mark Mazower argues that such a view is a dangerously unbalanced fantasy. A landmark reassessment, The Balkans rescues the region's history from the various ideological camps that have held it hostage for their own ends, not least the need to justify nonintervention. The heart of the book deals with events from the emergence of the nation-state onward. With searing eloquence, Mazower demonstrates that of all the gifts bequeathed to the region by modernity, the most dubious has been the ideological weapon of romantic nationalism that has been used again and again by the power hungry as an acid to dissolve the bonds of centuries of peaceful coexistence. The Balkans is a magnificent depiction of a vitally important region, its history and its prospects. From the Hardcover edition.

Networks of Power in Modern Greece

Essays in Honor of John Campbell

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 278

View: 9997

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Networks of Power in Modern Greece provides exciting new perspectives on Greek history and society. The collection presents pioneering work on the Greek merchant marine and the role of women in the Greek War of Independence. Local perspectives transform common assumptions regarding the function of miracle-working shrines and the place of religion in the early nineteenth century. Essays show how clientilistic networks linked the nationalist heroes of the Macedonian Struggle to the anticommunism of the Civil War, analyze the populist radicalism of Andreas Papandreou, a figure who dominated Greek politics in the final decades of the Cold War, and emphasize the ambiguities of a "modern Greece." Additional chapters by leading anthropologists, such as Renée Hirschon, Roger Just, and Juliet Du Boulay, apply an ethnographic approach toward the understanding of social institutions and practices, from divorce to sacred foodstuffs. Written in honor of the classical historian John Campbell, the multidisciplinary essays challenge conventional ideas of Greek nationalism and social development and touch upon broader issues, including the emergence of nation-states, the relationship between familial and ideological conflict, and the continued relevance of religion in modern life.

Levant

Splendour and Catastrophe on the Mediterranean

Author: Philip Mansel

Publisher: BookCase London

ISBN: 9780300181715

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 3259

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Chronicles the history of three major cities in the Levant region--Smyrna, Alexandria, and Beirut--from its golden age in the sixteenth century when different cultures and religions lived together to the present day.

Greece and the Inter-war Economic Crisis

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198202059

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 334

View: 9056

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The great depression of the inter-war years was the most profound shock ever to strike the world economy, and is widely held to have led directly to the collapse of parliamentary democracy in many countries. This study of Greece in the inter-war period, however, demonstrates that there was no simple correlation between economic and political crisis. Drawing on detailed statistical research, Mazower explores how an underdeveloped country like Greece was able to recover so quickly from the economic crisis. He examines the complex processes involved, showing how recovery, like crisis, threatened prevailing notions of the relationship between state and society, and undermined ruling elites. He also shows how the rapid economic recovery of the Greeks after 1932 was succeeded in 1936 by the establishment of the Metaxas dictatorship.

Crossing the Aegean

An Appraisal of the 1923 Compulsory Population Exchange between Greece and Turkey

Author: Renée Hirschon

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9780857457028

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7584

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Following the defeat of the Greek Army in 1922 by nationalist Turkish forces, the 1923 Lausanne Convention specified the first internationally ratified compulsory population exchange. It proved to be a watershed in the eastern Mediterranean, having far-reaching ramifications both for the new Turkish Republic, and for Greece which hadto absorb over a million refugees. Known as the Asia Minor Catastrophe by the Greeks, it marked the establishment of the independent nation state for the Turks. The consequences of this event have received surprisingly little attention despite the considerable relevance for the contemporary situation in the Balkans. This volume addresses the challenge of writing history from both sides of the Aegean and provides, for the first time, a forum for multidisciplinary dialogue across national boundaries.