Sapelo

People and Place on a Georgia Sea Island

Author: Buddy Sullivan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780820350165

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 6645

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"Sapelo will be a resource to both scholars and general readers wishing to know more about the island's history. The book uses both primary and secondary sources to paint a picture of the island's many dimensions and discrete periods (e.g. ecological, Native American, Spanish mission, antebellum plantation, African-American, and twentieth century)"--

Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater

A New Revised Edition

Author: Buddy Sullivan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781483593593

Category:

Page: 1000

View: 7553

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Author Buddy Sullivan's "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater: A New Revised Edition" represents a complete recasting of a book issued under the same title in 1990, and reprinted five times. Sullivan is a prominent coastal Georgia historian and lecturer with nineteen titles to his credit. This new edition of "Early Days" incorporates all the material in the original version, in addition to considerable new information based on the author’s recent research. Additionally, the new "Early Days" has been reformatted to reflect improved chapter sequence and content to provide a smoother, more continuous narrative flow than that of the original edition. In essence, the revised edition is a completely new book that will be of improved utility to researchers, students, and the general reader. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is a comprehensive history of Sapelo Island, Darien and McIntosh County, Georgia, as well as a general overview of the history of coastal Georgia, focusing on Glynn, Liberty and Bryan counties, Savannah, and St. Simons and St. Catherines islands. It covers the full scope of coastal history: Guale Indians, Spanish missionaries, and early settlement by English colonists; the rice and cotton economy during the plantation era built upon the labors of enslaved peop≤ Civil War events, including the controversial burning of Darien; the timber industry, and the associated shipping activity that made Darien a leading center for the export of pine lumber for forty years; the emerging commercial oyster and shrimping fisheries; and the impact of millionaires, scientists and resident African Americans on the 20th century history of the region, especially Sapelo Island. Significantly, the new edition of "Early Days" relates the story of the area’s African American communities, particularly the developing Geechee settlements at Sapelo, Harris Neck and Darien in the years from the end of the Civil War through the 20th century. The author’s thematic approach is that of establishing the important connection between the ecology of the area with its history. This recurring theme will be apparent throughout the book in an analysis of just how people utilized the environmental circumstances unique to their region and adapted them to virtually every aspect of their lives and livelihood for 300 years. "Early Days" is thus essentially a story of land use and landscape: soils, tides, salt marshes, river hydrology, weather, and how these conditions impacted the agricultural, commercial and social development of the region. Of equal significance is the use people have made of the tidal waterways and fresh-water river systems, giving the new edition a distinctly maritime flavor. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is documented through source notes and an expanded index, and includes photographs of places and people, and localized maps that provide the geographical context necessary for an understanding of the economic, maritime and cultural dynamics of the coast.

Deep Souths

Delta, Piedmont, and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation

Author: J. William Harris

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801865633

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 2425

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"This book succeeds admirably in... show[ing] that far from being static during the years between Reconstruction and the Second World War, the southern states were rapidly changing... It would be hard to find a better ground-level account." -- Times Literary Supplement

Under the Guardianship of the Nation

The Freedmen's Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870

Author: Paul A. Cimbala

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820325118

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 7062

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The Freedmen's Bureau was an extraordinary agency established by Congress in 1865, born of the expansion of federal power during the Civil War and the Union's desire to protect and provide for the South's emancipated slaves. Charged with the mandate to change the southern racial "status quo" in education, civil rights, and labor, the Bureau was in a position to play a crucial role in the implementation of Reconstruction policy. The ineffectiveness of the Bureau in Georgia and other southern states has often been blamed on the racism of its northern administrators, but Paul A. Cimbala finds the explanation to be much more complex. In this remarkably balanced account, he blames the failure on a combination of the Bureau's northern free-labor ideology, limited resources, and temporary nature--as well as deeply rooted white southern hostility toward change. Because of these factors, the Bureau in practice left freedpeople and ex-masters to create their own new social, political, and economic arrangements.

How Sweet the Sound

The Spirit of African American History

Author: Nancy Elizabeth Fitch

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 542

View: 673

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This new reader contains 38 selections relating to African American cultural history. Drawing upon the author's interest and expertise in oral traditions, this reader identifies historical "texts" that reveal thought and achievement in African American communities in the United States. Professor Fitch emphasizes such non-written records as orature, movement and dance, vernacular architecture, and the plastic arts in combating the notion that traditionally oral communities have little to offer historians. HOW SWEET THE SOUND portrays the urgency and vibrancy of African American history.

Kid Carolina

R. J. Reynolds Jr., a Tobacco Fortune, and the Mysterious Death of a Southern Icon

Author: Heidi Schnakenberg

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1599952696

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 724

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The Reynolds tobacco family was an American dynasty like the Rockefellers, Vanderbilts, and Astors. R.J. "Dick" Reynolds Jr. was born into privilege and decadence, but his disastrous personal life eventually destroyed almost every relationship he cherished and stole his health at a relatively young age. Dick Reynolds was dubbed "Kid Carolina" when as a teenager, he ran away from home and stowed away as part of the crew on a freighter. For the rest of his life he'd turn to the sea, instead of his friends and family, for comfort. Dick disappeared for months at a time, leading the dual life of a business mogul and troubled soul, both of which became legendary. Despite his personal demons, Dick played a pivotal role in shaping twentieth-century America through his business savvy and politics. He developed Delta and Eastern Airlines, single handedly secured FDR's third term election, and served as mayor of Winston-Salem, where his tobacco fortune was built. Yet below the gilded surface lay a turbulent life of alcoholism, infidelity, and loneliness. His chaotic existence culminated in a surprise fourth marriage and was shortly followed by a strange death, the end of a life every bit as awe-inspiring as it was disturbing.

Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands

Author: N.A

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820323893

Category: Music

Page: 256

View: 992

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A valuable collection of folk music and lore from the Gullah culture, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands preserves the rich traditions of slave descendants on the barrier islands of Georgia by interweaving their music with descriptions of their language, religious and social customs, and material culture. Collected over a period of nearly twenty-five years by Lydia Parrish, the sixty folk songs and attendant lore included in this book are evidence of antebellum traditions kept alive in the relatively isolated coastal regions of Georgia. Over the years, Parrish won the confidence of many of the African-American singers, not only collecting their songs but also discovering other elements of traditional culture that formed the context of those songs. When it was first published in 1942, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands contained much material that had not previously appeared in print. The songs are grouped in categories, including African survival songs; shout songs; ring-play, dance, and fiddle songs; and religious and work songs. In additions to the lyrics and melodies, Slave Songs includes Lydia Parrish's explanatory notes, character sketches of her informants, anecdotes, and a striking portfolio of photographs. Reproduced in its original oversized format, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands will inform and delight students and scholars of African-American culture and folklore as well as folk music enthusiasts.

The Journal of Archibald C. McKinley

Author: Archibald Carlisle McKinley

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820311876

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 6967

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A valuable document from the Reconstruction era, The Journal of Archibald C. McKinley offers the modern reader a rare glimpse of daily life on Sapelo Island, Georgia, as seen through the eyes of an upper-class farmer. A descendant of Scottish settlers, Archibald McKinley was born in Lexington, Georgia, in 1842 and served as a Confederate officer during the Civil War. Just after the war, he began farming near Milledgeville, Georgia, and within a year had met and married Sarah Spalding, a granddaughter of Thomas Spalding, who had built his plantation empire on Sapelo Island. In 1869, the McKinleys moved to Sapelo to raise cotton, sugar cane, and other crops. The bulk of this journal is a sustained account of their sojourn on the island through 1876, before their return to Milledgeville. The brief, matter-of-fact entries that make up McKinley's journal focus mainly on the small occurrences that filled his days: farm work, hunting and fishing expeditions, sailing excursions, church services, changes in the weather, the disposition of his crops, the development of the Darien timber shipping trade. Scattered throughout, however, are intriguing references to dramatic events--shootings, trials, tensions between whites and the recently freed blacks--and to the processes of Reconstruction, as when McKinley notes that "a company of Yankee soldiers" had arrived at the penitentiary to ensure equal treatment of black and white convicts. The longest entry in the journal is a eulogy for a freedman named Scott, who, as McKinley's slave, had remained "true as steel" during McKinley's service in the Civil War. Editor Robert L. Humphries has included with the journal several of the McKinley family letters, written after Archibald and Sarah left Sapelo Island. In the introduction, historian Russell Duncan places the story in context, focusing on the larger events of Reconstruction as they pertained to Sapelo Island and to the relations between blacks and whites there.

The Hoffman Reports

Author: Jeffrey Hoffman

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1387608185

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 440

View: 7303

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From an idyllic, early 50's childhood in the Golden Isles of Georgia, to a long relaxing retirement on Sea Island, the author recalls people, places, events and historical details of interest to both visitors and current residents. More than 250 easy-reading articles have been selected from those previously published as ""The Hoffman Reports"" column in the local ""Weekend"" newspaper or as invited articles to the ""Brunswick News,"" ""Elegant Island Living"" and ""The Golden Isles Magazine.""

Hidden Georgia

Author: Marty Olmstead

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781569752890

Category: Georgia

Page: 432

View: 7673

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This veteran travel writer returns to her home state to capture its inviting persona (and visit her relatives). The result of her research and recollections is a guide to Hidden Georgia.

Der Samurai von Savannah

Roman

Author: T.C. Boyle

Publisher: Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH Co KG

ISBN: 3446243917

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 2296

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Ein japanischer Matrose wird auf der Suche nach seinem amerikanischen Hippievater am Strand einer gottverlassenen Insel vor der Küste Georgias angeschwemmt. Auf der Insel, die von schwarzen Hungerleidern, exaltierten Künstlern und biederen amerikanischen Bürgern, die dort Ferien machen, bewohnt wird, kommt es zu einer dramatischen Begegnung zweier gegensätzlicher Kulturen. Boyles tragikomischer Roman über die blutigen Mißverständnisse, die aus Unkenntnis des Fremden entstehen, hält den Leser bis zur letzten Seite in Atem.

Sapelo Voices

Historical Anthropology and the Oral Traditions of Gullah-Geechee Communities on Sapelo Island, Georgia

Author: Cornelia Bailey,Norma Harris,Karen Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Educational technology

Page: 293

View: 1250

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Their Memories, Our Treasure

Conversations with African American Women of Wisdom

Author: Gloria Jean Wade Gayles

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African American women

Page: 275

View: 3206

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America, History and Life

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Canada

Page: N.A

View: 6533

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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Swamp Water and Wiregrass

Historical Sketches of Coastal Georgia

Author: George A. Rogers,R. Frank Saunders

Publisher: Mercer University Press

ISBN: 9780865540996

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 6870

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African American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry

The Atlantic World and the Gullah Geechee

Author: Philip Morgan

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820343072

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 8432

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The lush landscape and subtropical climate of the Georgia coast only enhance the air of mystery enveloping some of its inhabitants—people who owe, in some ways, as much to Africa as to America. As the ten previously unpublished essays in this volume examine various aspects of Georgia lowcountry life, they often engage a central dilemma: the region's physical and cultural remoteness helps to preserve the venerable ways of its black inhabitants, but it can also marginalize the vital place of lowcountry blacks in the Atlantic World. The essays, which range in coverage from the founding of the Georgia colony in the early 1700s through the present era, explore a range of topics, all within the larger context of the Atlantic world. Included are essays on the double-edged freedom that the American Revolution made possible to black women, the lowcountry as site of the largest gathering of African Muslims in early North America, and the coexisting worlds of Christianity and conjuring in coastal Georgia and the links (with variations) to African practices. A number of fascinating, memorable characters emerge, among them the defiant Mustapha Shaw, who felt entitled to land on Ossabaw Island and resisted its seizure by whites only to become embroiled in struggles with other blacks; Betty, the slave woman who, in the spirit of the American Revolution, presented a “list of grievances” to her master; and S'Quash, the Arabic-speaking Muslim who arrived on one of the last legal transatlantic slavers and became a head man on a North Carolina plantation. Published in association with the Georgia Humanities Council.