Shakespeare and Memory

Author: Hester Lees-Jeffries

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199674256

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 4908

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Hamlet's father's Ghost asks his son to 'Remember me!', but how did people remember around 1600? And how do we remember now? Shakespeare and Memory brings together classical and early modern sources, theatre history, performance, material culture, and cognitive psychology and neuroscience in order to explore ideas about memory in Shakespeare's plays and poems. It argues that, when Shakespeare was writing, ideas about memory were undergoing a kind of crisis, as both the technologies of memory (print, the theatre itself) and the belief structures underpinning ideas about memory underwent rapid change. And it suggests that this crisis might be mirrored in our own time, when, despite all the increasing gadgetry at our disposal, memory can still be recovered, falsified, corrupted, or wiped: only we ourselves can remember, but the workings of memory remain mysterious. Shakespeare and Memory draws on works from all stages of Shakespeare's career, with a particular focus on Hamlet, the Sonnets, Twelfth Night, and The Winter's Tale. It considers some little things: what's Hamlet writing on? And why does Orsino think he smells violets? And it asks some big questions: how should the dead be remembered? What's the relationship between memory and identity? And is it art, above all, that enables love and beauty, memory and identity, to endure in the face of loss, time, and death?

The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Memory

Author: Andrew Hiscock,Lina Perkins Wilder

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317596846

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 362

View: 7393

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The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Memory introduces this vibrant field of study to students and scholars, whilst defining and extending critical debates in the area. The book begins with a series of "Critical Introductions" offering an overview of memory in particular areas of Shakespeare such as theatre, print culture, visual arts, post-colonial adaptation and new media. These essays both introduce the topic but also explore specific areas such as the way in which Shakespeare’s representation in the visual arts created a national and then a global poet. The entries then develop into more specific studies of the genre of Shakespeare, with sections on Tragedy, History, Comedy and Poetry, which include insightful readings of specific key plays. The book ends with a state of the art review of the area, charting major contributions to the debate, and illuminating areas for further study. The international range of contributors explore the nature of memory in religious, political, emotional and economic terms which are not only relevant to Shakespearean times, but to the way we think and read now.

Skepticism and Memory in Shakespeare and Donne

Author: A. Sherman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137086106

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 9206

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This book fills a lacuna in the intellectual history of the seventeenth century by investigating the role that skepticism plays in the declining prestige of memory. It argues that Shakespeare and Donne revolutionize the art of memory, thanks to their skepticism, and thereby transform literary strategies like mimesis, exemplarity, and pastoral.

Cognition in the Globe

Attention and Memory in Shakespeare’s Theatre

Author: E. Tribble

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230118518

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 3996

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Early modern playing companies performed up to six different plays a week and mounted new plays frequently. This book seeks to answer a seemingly simple question: how did they do it? Drawing upon work in philosophy and the cognitive sciences, it proposes that the cognitive work of theatre is distributed across body, brain, and world.

Reverberating Song in Shakespeare and Milton

Language, Memory, and Musical Representation

Author: Asst Prof Erin Minear

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409479129

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 3436

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In this study, Erin Minear explores the fascination of Shakespeare and Milton with the ability of music–heard, imagined, or remembered–to infiltrate language. Such infected language reproduces not so much the formal or sonic properties of music as its effects. Shakespeare's and Milton's understanding of these effects was determined, she argues, by history and culture as well as individual sensibility. They portray music as uncanny and divine, expressive and opaque, promoting associative rather than logical thought processes and unearthing unexpected memories. The title reflects the multiple and overlapping meanings of reverberation in the study: the lingering and infectious nature of musical sound; the questionable status of audible, earthly music as an echo of celestial harmonies; and one writer's allusions to another. Minear argues that many of the qualities that seem to us characteristically 'Shakespearean' stem from Shakespeare's engagement with how music works-and that Milton was deeply influenced by this aspect of Shakespearean poetics. Analyzing Milton's account of Shakespeare's 'warbled notes,' she demonstrates that he saw Shakespeare as a peculiarly musical poet, deeply and obscurely moving his audience with language that has ceased to mean, but nonetheless lingers hauntingly in the mind. Obsessed with the relationship between words and music for reasons of his own, including his father's profession as a composer, Milton would adopt, adapt, and finally reject Shakespeare's form of musical poetics in his own quest to 'join the angel choir.' Offering a new way of looking at the work of two major authors, this study engages and challenges scholars of Shakespeare, Milton, and early modern culture.

Shakespeare and the Second World War

Memory, Culture, Identity

Author: Irene Rima Makaryk

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442644028

Category: Drama

Page: 338

View: 5023

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Shakespeare's works occupy a prismatic and complex position in world culture: they straddle both the high and the low, the national and the foreign, literature and theatre. The Second World War presents a fascinating case study of this phenomenon: most, if not all, of its combatants have laid claim to Shakespeare and have called upon his work to convey their society's self-image. In wartime, such claims frequently brought to the fore a crisis of cultural identity and of competing ownership of this 'universal' author. Despite this, the role of Shakespeare during the Second World War has not yet been examined or documented in any depth. Shakespeare and the Second World War provides the first sustained international, collaborative incursion into this terrain. The essays demonstrate how the wide variety of ways in which Shakespeare has been recycled, reviewed, and reinterpreted from 1939–1945 are both illuminated by and continue to illuminate the War today.

Confession and Memory in Early Modern English Literature

Penitential Remains

Author: Paul D. Stegner,Teichmann

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113755861X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 9922

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This is the first study to consider the relationship between private confessional rituals and memory across a range of early modern writers, including Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, and Robert Southwell.

Memories of War in Early Modern England

Armor and Militant Nostalgia in Marlowe, Sidney, and Shakespeare

Author: Susan Harlan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137580127

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 317

View: 8835

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This book examines literary depictions of the construction and destruction of the armored male body in combat in relation to early modern English understandings of the past. Bringing together the fields of material culture and militarism, Susan Harlan argues that the notion of “spoiling” – or the sanctioned theft of the arms and armor of the vanquished in battle – provides a way of thinking about England’s relationship to its violent cultural inheritance. She demonstrates how writers reconstituted the spoils of antiquity and the Middle Ages in an imagined military struggle between male bodies. An analysis of scenes of arming and disarming across texts by Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare and tributes to Sir Philip Sidney reveals a pervasive militant nostalgia: a cultural fascination with moribund models and technologies of war. Readers will not only gain a better understanding of humanism but also a new way of thinking about violence and cultural production in Renaissance England.

Shakespeare, Memory and Performance

Author: Peter Holland

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521863805

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 357

View: 7839

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This collection by leading Shakespeare scholars, first published in 2006, brings together memory and performance.

Shakespeare's Memory Theatre

Recollection, Properties, and Character

Author: Lina Perkins Wilder

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521764556

Category: Drama

Page: 221

View: 8837

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Wilder examines the excessive remembering of figures such as Romeo, Falstaff, and Hamlet as a way of defining Shakespeare's theatricality.

Shakespeare and Donne

Generic Hybrids and the Cultural Imaginary

Author: Judith H. Anderson,Jennifer C. Vaught

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 082325125X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 291

View: 6129

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For more than fifty years, the proximity of Donne's work to Shakespeare's, including the range of their writings, has received scant attention. Centering on cross-fertilization between the writings of Shakespeare and Donne, the essays in this volume examine relationships that are broadly cultural, theoretical, and imaginative.

Shakespeare and I

Author: William McKenzie,Theodora Papadopoulou

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 144119200X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 9156

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Following the ethos and ambition of the Shakespeare NOW! series, and harnessing the energy, challenge and vigour of the 'minigraph' form, Shakespeare and I is a provocative appeal and manifesto for a more personal form of criticism. A number of the most exciting and authoritative writers on Shakespeare examine and scrutinise their deepest, most personal and intimate responses to Shakespeare's plays and poems, to ask themselves if and how Shakespeare has made them the person they are. Their responses include autobiographical histories, reflections on their relationship to their professional, institutional or familial roles and meditations on the person-making force of religious or political conviction. A blog at http://shakespearenowseries.blogspot.com enables both contributors and readers to continue the debate about why Shakespeare keeps us reading and what that means for our lives today. The book aims to inspire readers to think and write about their ever-changing personal relationship with Shakespeare: about how the poems and plays - and writing about them - can reveal or transform our sense of ourselves.

Shakespeare in Europe

History and Memory

Author: Marta Gibińska

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9788323324669

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 342

View: 4266

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The essays collected in the present volume are the result of a long-term project. An international group of scholars addressed questions connected with the relation of the changing concepts of history and the status of history in Shakespearean plays in reading and in actual representation on the stage. Especially interesting aspects of the research deal with the transposition of the time and place of Shakespeare's plays to the time and place of their reception within the context of historical awareness; equally fascinating are the studies which up the perspectives of the medieval and Renaissance contexts. Memory and how in operates (or how we operate it) turns out to be an indispensable complement to the research on the literary and dramatic representation of history. The variety of problems and aspects tackled here opens up interesting insights into the diversity of experience of and reflection on history and representation of history in Shakespeare's plays.

Shakespeare and Classical Antiquity

Author: Colin Burrow

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199684782

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 281

View: 768

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This book explains for students and scholars the nature and extent of Shakespeare's classical learning. It shows why Ben Jonson was wrong to claim that he had 'small Latin and less Greek', and demonstrates that Shakespeare acquired the central foundations of his art from his classical reading. It explores in detail his relationship to Virgil, Ovid, Plautus, Terence, Seneca, and Plutarch, as well as showing how his beliefs about and attitudes towards classicalliterature changed in the course of his career.

Shakespeare and the Countess: The Battle that Gave Birth to the Globe

Author: Chris Laoutaris

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 160598793X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 789

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The colorful story of the creation of the Globe Theatre—as a result of the dramatic confrontation between Lady Elizabeth Russell and William Shakespeare. In November 1596, a woman signed a document that would nearly destroy the career of William Shakespeare . . . Who was this woman who played such an instrumental, yet little known, role in Shakespeare's life? Never far from controversy when she was alive—she sparked numerous riots and indulged in acts of breaking-and-entering, bribery, blackmail, kidnapping and armed combat—Lady Elizabeth Russell, the self-styled Dowager Countess of Bedford, has been edited out of public memory, yet the chain of events she set in motion would make Shakespeare the legendary figure we all know today. Lady Elizabeth Russell’s extraordinary life made her one of the most formidable women of the Renaissance. The daughter of King Edward VI’s tutor, she blazed a trail across Elizabethan England as an intellectual and radical Protestant. And, in November 1596, she became the leader of a movement aimed at destroying William Shakespeare’s theatrical troupe—a plot that resulted in the closure of the Blackfriars Theatre but the construction, instead, of the Globe. Providing new pieces to this puzzle, Chris Laoutaris's rousing history reveals for the first time this startling battle against Shakespeare and the Lord Chamberlain's Men.

Shakespeare and Space

Theatrical Explorations of the Spatial Paradigm

Author: Ina Habermann,Michelle Witen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137518359

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 282

View: 9343

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This collection offers an overview of the ways in which space has become relevant to the study of Shakespearean drama and theatre. It distinguishes various facets of space, such as structural aspects of dramatic composition, performance space and the evocation of place, linguistic, social and gendered spaces, early modern geographies, and the impact of theatrical mobility on cultural exchange and the material world. These facets of space are exemplified in individual essays. Throughout, the Shakespearean stage is conceived as a topological ‘node’, or interface between different times, places and people – an approach which also invokes Edward Soja’s notion of ‘Thirdspace’ to describe the blend between the real and the imaginary characteristic of Shakespeare’s multifaceted theatrical world. Part Two of the volume emphasises the theatrical mobility of Hamlet – conceptually from an anthropological perspective, and historically in the tragedy’s migrations to Germany, Russia and North America.

Reverberating Song in Shakespeare and Milton

Language, Memory, and Musical Representation

Author: Asst Prof Erin Minear

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409479129

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 5470

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In this study, Erin Minear explores the fascination of Shakespeare and Milton with the ability of music–heard, imagined, or remembered–to infiltrate language. Such infected language reproduces not so much the formal or sonic properties of music as its effects. Shakespeare's and Milton's understanding of these effects was determined, she argues, by history and culture as well as individual sensibility. They portray music as uncanny and divine, expressive and opaque, promoting associative rather than logical thought processes and unearthing unexpected memories. The title reflects the multiple and overlapping meanings of reverberation in the study: the lingering and infectious nature of musical sound; the questionable status of audible, earthly music as an echo of celestial harmonies; and one writer's allusions to another. Minear argues that many of the qualities that seem to us characteristically 'Shakespearean' stem from Shakespeare's engagement with how music works-and that Milton was deeply influenced by this aspect of Shakespearean poetics. Analyzing Milton's account of Shakespeare's 'warbled notes,' she demonstrates that he saw Shakespeare as a peculiarly musical poet, deeply and obscurely moving his audience with language that has ceased to mean, but nonetheless lingers hauntingly in the mind. Obsessed with the relationship between words and music for reasons of his own, including his father's profession as a composer, Milton would adopt, adapt, and finally reject Shakespeare's form of musical poetics in his own quest to 'join the angel choir.' Offering a new way of looking at the work of two major authors, this study engages and challenges scholars of Shakespeare, Milton, and early modern culture.

The Book of Will

Author: Lauren Gunderson

Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

ISBN: 0822237725

Category: Drama

Page: 95

View: 4572

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Without William Shakespeare, we wouldn’t have literary masterpieces like Romeo and Juliet. But without Henry Condell and John Heminges, we would have lost half of Shakespeare’s plays forever! After the death of their friend and mentor, the two actors are determined to compile the First Folio and preserve the words that shaped their lives. They’ll just have to borrow, beg, and band together to get it done. Amidst the noise and color of Elizabethan London, THE BOOK OF WILL finds an unforgettable true story of love, loss, and laughter, and sheds new light on a man you may think you know.