Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World

Author: Donald G. Kyle

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118613805

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 3976

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The second edition of Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World updates Donald G. Kyle’s award-winning introduction to this topic, covering the Ancient Near East up to the late Roman Empire. • Challenges traditional scholarship on sport and spectacle in the Ancient World and debunks claims that there were no sports before the ancient Greeks • Explores the cultural exchange of Greek sport and Roman spectacle and how each culture responded to the other’s entertainment • Features a new chapter on sport and spectacle during the Late Roman Empire, including Christian opposition to pagan games and the Roman response • Covers topics including violence, professionalism in sport, class, gender and eroticism, and the relationship of spectacle to political structures

Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World

Author: Donald G. Kyle

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 0631229701

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 2255

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This is a readable, up-to-date, illustrated introduction to the history of sport and spectacle in the ancient world from the Ancient Near East through Greek and Hellenistic times and into the Roman Empire. Covers athletics, combat sports, chariot racing, beast fights and gladiators. Traces the precursors of Greek and Roman sports and spectacles in the Ancient Near East and the Bronze Age Aegean. Investigates the origins, nature and meaning of sport, covering issues of violence, professionalism, class, gender and eroticism. Challenges the notion that Greek sport and Roman spectacle were polar opposites. Approaches sport and spectacle as overlapping and compatible features of civilized states and empires.

Athletics in the Ancient World

Author: E. Norman Gardiner

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486147452

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 352

View: 3521

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Concise, convincing book emphasizes relationship between Greek and Roman athletics and religion, art, and education. Colorful descriptions of the pentathlon, foot-race, wrestling, boxing, ball playing, and more. 137 black-and-white illustrations.

Spectacles of Death in Ancient Rome

Author: Donald G. Kyle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134862717

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9311

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The elaborate and inventive slaughter of humans and animals in the arena fed an insatiable desire for violent spectacle among the Roman people. Donald G. Kyle combines the words of ancient authors with current scholarly research and cross-cultural perspectives, as he explores * the origins and historical development of the games * who the victims were and why they were chosen * how the Romans disposed of the thousands of resulting corpses * the complex religious and ritual aspects of institutionalised violence * the particularly savage treatment given to defiant Christians. This lively and original work provides compelling, sometimes controversial, perspectives on the bloody entertainments of ancient Rome, which continue to fascinate us to this day.

Combat Sports in the Ancient World

Competition, Violence, and Culture

Author: Michael B. Poliakoff

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300063127

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 4953

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A study of the practice of combat sports in the ancient civilizations of Greece, Rome and the Near East. The author discusses topics such as the function of competition and violent games in ancient society, the significance of combat sport in myth and literature, and their cultic functions.

A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity

Author: Paul Christesen,Donald G. Kyle

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118610059

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 680

View: 4226

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A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity presents a series of essays that apply a socio-historical perspective to myriad aspects of ancient sport and spectacle. Covers the Bronze Age to the Byzantine Empire Includes contributions from a range of international scholars with various Classical antiquity specialties Goes beyond the usual concentrations on Olympia and Rome to examine sport in cities and territories throughout the Mediterranean basin Features a variety of illustrations, maps, end-of-chapter references, internal cross-referencing, and a detailed index to increase accessibility and assist researchers

Ancient Greek Athletics

Author: Stephen G. Miller

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300115291

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 829

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The earliest Olympic games began more than twenty-five-hundred years ago. What were they like, how were they organized, who participated? Were ancient sports a means of preparing youth for warfare? In this lavishly illustrated book, a world expert on ancient Greek athletics provides the first comprehensive introduction to the subject, vividly describing ancient sporting events and games and exploring their impact on art, literature, and politics. Using a wide array of ancient sources, written and visual, and including recent archaeological discoveries, Stephen Miller reconstructs ancient Greek athletic festivals and the details of specific athletic events. He also explores broader themes, including the role of women in ancient athletics, the place of amateurism, and the relationship between athletic events and social and political life. Published in the year the modern Olympic Games return to Athens, this book will be a source of information and enjoyment for anyone interested in the history of athletics and the origins of the world{u2019}s most famous sporting event.

The Roman Games

Historical Sources in Translation

Author: Alison Futrell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405153156

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 8158

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This sourcebook presents a wealth of material relating to every aspect of Roman spectacles, especially gladiatorial combat and chariot racing. Draws on the words of eye-witnesses and participants, as well as depictions of the games in mosaics and other works of art. Offers snapshots of “a day at the games” and “the life of a gladiator”. Includes numerous illustrations. Covers chariot-races, water pageants, naval battles and wild animal fights, as well as gladiatorial combat. Combines political, social, religious and archaeological perspectives. Facilitates an in-depth understanding of this important feature of ancient life.

Sport in the Cultures of the Ancient World

New Perspectives

Author: Zinon Papakonstantinou

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131798949X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 536

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Sport has been practised in the Greco-Roman world at least since the second millennium BC. It was socially integrated and was practised in the context of ceremonial performances, physical education and established local and international competitions including, most famously, the Olympic Games. In recent years, the continuous re-assessment of old and new evidence in conjunction with the development of new methodological perspectives have created the need for a fresh examination of central aspects of ancient sport in a single volume. This book fills that gap in ancient sport scholarship. When did the ancient Olympics begin? How is sport depicted in the work of the fifth-century historian Herodotus? What was the association between sport and war in fifth- and fourth-century BC Athens? What were the social and political implications of the practice of Greek-style sport in third-century BC Ptolemaic Egypt? How were Roman gladiatorial shows perceived and transformed in the Greek-speaking east? And what were the conditions of sport participation by boys and girls in ancient Rome? These are some of the questions that this book, written by an international cast of distinguished scholars on ancient sport, attempts to answer. Covering a wide chronological and geographical scope (ancient Mediterranean from the early first millennium BC to fourth century AD), individual articles re-examine old and new evidence, and offer stimulating, original interpretations of key aspects of ancient sport in its political, military, cultural, social, ceremonial and ideological setting. This book was previously published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.

Athletics and Philosophy in the Ancient World

Contests of Virtue

Author: Heather L. Reid

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317984951

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 6073

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This book examines the relationship between athletics and philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome focused on the connection between athleticism and virtue. It begins by observing that the link between athleticism and virtue is older than sport, reaching back to the athletic feats of kings and pharaohs in early Egypt and Mesopotamia. It then traces the role of athletics and the Olympic Games in transforming the idea of aristocracy as something acquired by birth to something that can be trained. This idea of training virtue through the techniques and practice of athletics is examined in relation to Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Then Roman spectacles such as chariot racing and gladiator games are studied in light of the philosophy of Lucretius, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius. The concluding chapter connects the book’s ancient observations with contemporary issues such as the use of athletes as role models, the relationship between money and corruption, the relative worth of participation and spectatorship, and the role of females in sport. The author argues that there is a strong link between sport and philosophy in the ancient world, calling them offspring of common parents: concern about virtue and the spirit of free enquiry. This book was previously published as a special issue of the Ethics and Sport.

Sports and Games of the Ancients

Author: Steve Craig

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313316005

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 1196

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Looks at some of the sports and games of the ancient world from seven different geographic regions as they are currently understood, and includes suggestions on how to adapt many of the games to modern use.

Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds

Greek athletic identities and Roman sports and spectacle. Volume 2

Author: Thomas F. Scanlon

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198703783

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 5775

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From the identity of Greek athletes and the place of Greek games in the Roman era to forms, functions, and venues of Roman spectacles, this second volume of Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds contains eleven articles and chapters of enduring importance to the study of ancient Greek and Roman sport, a field located at a crucial intersection of social history, archaeology, literature, and other aspects of those cultures. The studies have been updated with addenda by the original authors, and four of the articles that were originally published in German have been translated into English here for the first time. The studies, selected for breadth and importance of historical topics, include: the economics, status, gender, and training of ancient athletes; the place of Greek athletes in the Roman era; the evolution of Roman games from Etruscan customs and of the Roman arena from earlier traditions; the monetary prices of gladiators; the role of animal games in Rome; and the Roman team sport of chariot racing. A companion first volume complements this one with studies on Greek sport in its epic, heroic, and Bronze Age origins; the ancient Olympics in its relation to religion, politics, and diversity of competitors; Greek events in track and field and equestrian events. The articles in both volumes offer an excellent starting point to inspire newcomers to the study of ancient sport, and to give students and scholars an informative set of models for present knowledge and future research.

Gladiators and Caesars

The Power of Spectacle in Ancient Rome

Author: Eckart Köhne,Cornelia Ewigleben

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520227989

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 153

View: 5148

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Describes the events and games held in the amphitheaters, cicuses, and theaters in ancient Rome.

Sport in Greece and Rome

Author: Harold Arthur Harris

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801407185

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8814

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Explores the social and historical aspects of ancient sporting activities as well as describing techniques and equipment

Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds

Early Greece, the Olympics, and contests. Volume 1

Author: Thomas F. Scanlon

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199215324

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 5793

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From the Minoan bull-leaping to the ancient Olympics and the enigmas of their contests, this first volume of Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds contains nine articles and chapters of enduring importance to the study of sport in ancient Greece, a field located at a crucial intersection of social history, archaeology, literature, and other aspects of Greek culture. The studies have been updated with addenda by the original authors, and two of the articles that were originally published in German or French have been translated into English here for the first time. The studies, selected for breadth and importance of historical topics, include: Greek sport in its epic, heroic, and Bronze Age origins; the ancient Olympics in its relation to religion, politics, and diversity of competitors; Greek events in track and field and equestrian events. A companion second volume complements this one with studies on the social and economic aspects of Greek sport, the role of Greek sport in the Roman era, and forms, functions and venues of Roman spectacles. The articles in both volumes offer an excellent starting point to inspire newcomers to the study of ancient sport, and to give students and scholars an informative set of models for present knowledge and future research.

Gladiators

Violence and Spectacle in Ancient Rome

Author: Roger Dunkle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317905210

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 6393

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The games comprised gladiatorial fights, staged animal hunts (venationes) and the executions of convicted criminals and prisoners of war. Besides entertaining the crowd, the games delivered a powerful message of Roman power: as a reminder of the wars in which Rome had acquired its empire, the distant regions of its far-flung empire (from where they had obtained wild beasts for the venatio), and the inevitability of Roman justice for criminals and those foreigners who had dared to challenge the empire's authority. Though we might see these games as bloodthirsty, cruel and reprehensible condemning any alien culture out of hand for a sport that offends our sensibilities smacks of cultural chauvinism. Instead one should judge an ancient sport by the standards of its contemporary cultural context. This book offers a fascinating, and fair historical appraisal of gladiatorial combat, which will bring the games alive to the reader and help them see them through the eyes of the ancient Romans. It will answer questions about gladiatorial combat such as: What were its origins? Why did it disappear? Who were gladiators? How did they become gladiators? What was there training like? How did the Romans view gladiators? How were gladiator shows produced and advertised? What were the different styles of gladiatorial fighting? Did gladiator matches have referees? Did every match end in the death of at least one gladiator? Were gladiator games mere entertainment or did they play a larger role in Roman society? What was their political significance?

Blood in the Arena

The Spectacle of Roman Power

Author: Alison Futrell

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292792409

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4993

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From the center of Imperial Rome to the farthest reaches of ancient Britain, Gaul, and Spain, amphitheaters marked the landscape of the Western Roman Empire. Built to bring Roman institutions and the spectacle of Roman power to conquered peoples, many still remain as witnesses to the extent and control of the empire. In this book, Alison Futrell explores the arena as a key social and political institution for binding Rome and its provinces. She begins with the origins of the gladiatorial contest and shows how it came to play an important role in restructuring Roman authority in the later Republic. She then traces the spread of amphitheaters across the Western Empire as a means of transmitting and maintaining Roman culture and control in the provinces. Futrell also examines the larger implications of the arena as a venue for the ritualized mass slaughter of human beings, showing how the gladiatorial contest took on both religious and political overtones. This wide-ranging study, which draws insights from archaeology and anthropology, as well as Classics, broadens our understanding of the gladiatorial contest and its place within the highly politicized cult practice of the Roman Empire.

Sport in Ancient Times

Author: Nigel B. Crowther

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275987398

Category: History

Page: 183

View: 3937

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Crowther offers a fascinating look at the role of sport as practiced in the ancient world. From the Prehistoric Age in Egypt, Sumeria, Mesopotamia, and Persia to the "historic period" in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Byzantine Empire, he not only probes the games themselves, but explores the ways in which athletics figured into cultural arenas that extended beyond physical prowess to military associations, rituals, status, and politics. Among the subjects covered are Cretan bull-leaping and Bronze-Age boxing, the ancient Olympic Games, gladiatorial contests, chariot racing, and the role of women in ancient sports.

Sport, Bodily Culture and Classical Antiquity in Modern Greece

Author: Eleni Fournaraki,Zinon Papakonstantinou

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317979737

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 4471

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Ancient Greece was the model that guided the emergence of many facets of the modern sports movement, including most notably the Olympics. Yet the process whereby aspects of the ancient world were appropriated and manipulated by sport authorities of nation-states, athletic organizations and their leaders as well as by sports enthusiasts is only very partially understood. This volume takes modern Greece as a case-study and explores, in depth, issues related to the reception and use of classical antiquity in modern sport, spectacle and bodily culture. For citizens of the Greek nation-state, classical antiquity is not merely a vague "legacy" but the cornerstone of their national identity. In the field of sport and bodily culture, since the 1830s there had been persistent attempts to establish firm and direct links between ancient Greek athletics and modern sport through the incorporation of sport in school curricula, the emergence of national sport historiographies as well as the initiatives to revive (in the 19th century) or appropriate (in the 20th) the modern Olympics. Based on fieldwork and unpublished material sources, this book dissects the use and abuse of classical antiquity and sport in constructing national, gender and class identities, and illuminate aspects of the complex modern perceptions of classicism, sport and the body. This book was previously published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.