Sundown Towns

A Hidden Dimension of American Racism

Author: James W. Loewen

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 156584887X

Category: History

Page: 562

View: 2390

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Investigates segregation practices in the northern sections of twentieth-century America revealing how racial exclusion and oppression persisted into the contemporary era, and challenging modern beliefs about race and racism.

Witnessing Whiteness

The Need to Talk About Race and How to Do It

Author: Shelly Tochluk

Publisher: R&L Education

ISBN: 1607092565

Category: Education

Page: 277

View: 6729

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Witnessing Whiteness invites readers to consider what it means to be white, describes and critiques strategies used to avoid race issues, and identifies the detrimental effect of avoiding race on cross-race collaborations. The author illustrates how racial discomfort leads white people toward poor relationships with people of color. Questioning the implications our history has for personal lives and social institutions, the book considers political, economic, socio-cultural, and legal histories that shaped the meanings associated with whiteness. Drawing on dialogue with well-known figures within education, race, and multicultural work, the book offers intimate, personal stories of cross-race friendships that address both how a deep understanding of whiteness supports cross-race collaboration and the long-term nature of the work of excising racism from the deep psyche. Concluding chapters offer practical information on building knowledge, skills, capacities, and communities that support anti-racism practices, a hopeful look at our collective future, and a discussion of how to create a culture of witnesses who support allies for social and racial justice. For book discussion groups and workshop plans, please visit www.witnessingwhiteness.com.

Covert Racism

Theories, Institutions, and Experiences

Author: Rodney D. Coates

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004203656

Category: Social Science

Page: 461

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Covert Racism, subtle often hidden form of racism is explored through a multi-disciplinarian lens. The volume challenges the notion of a post-racial America.

Black on Earth

African American Ecoliterary Traditions

Author: Kimberly N. Ruffin

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820328561

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 212

View: 4536

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American environmental literature has relied heavily on the perspectives of European Americans, often ignoring other groups. In Black on Earth, Kimberly Ruffin expands the reach of ecocriticism by analyzing the ecological experiences, conceptions, and desires seen in African American writing. Ruffin identifies a theory of “ecological burden and beauty” in which African American authors underscore the ecological burdens of living within human hierarchies in the social order just as they explore the ecological beauty of being a part of the natural order. Blacks were ecological agents before the emergence of American nature writing, argues Ruffin, and their perspectives are critical to understanding the full scope of ecological thought. Ruffin examines African American ecological insights from the antebellum era to the twenty-first century, considering WPA slave narratives, neo–slave poetry, novels, essays, and documentary films, by such artists as Octavia Butler, Alice Walker, Henry Dumas, Percival Everett, Spike Lee, and Jayne Cortez. Identifying themes of work, slavery, religion, mythology, music, and citizenship, Black on Earth highlights the ways in which African American writers are visionary ecological artists.

Barack Obama and the Future of American Politics

Author: Paul Street

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317263391

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

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Many Americans believe Barak Obama represents a hopeful future for America. But does he also reflect the American politics of the past? This book offers the broadest and best-informed understanding on the meaning of the "Obama phenomenon" to date. Paul Street was on the ground throughout the Iowa campaign, and his stories of the rising Obama phenomenon are poignant. Yet the author's background in American political history allows him to explore the deeper meanings of Obama's remarkable political career. He looks at Obama in relation to contemporary issues of class, race, war, and empire. He considers Obama in the context of our nation's political history, with comparisons to FDR, JFK, Bill Clinton, and other leaders. Street finds that the Obama persona, crafted by campaign consultants and filtered through dominant media trends, masks the "change" candidate's adherence to long-prevailing power structures and party doctrines. He shows how American political culture has produced misperceptions by the electorate of Obama's positions and values. Obama is no magical exception to the narrow-spectrum electoral system and ideological culture that have done so much to define and limit the American political tradition. Yet the author suggests key ways in which Obama potentially advances democratic transformation. Street makes recommendations on how citizens can productively respond to and act upon Obama's influence and the broader historical and social forces that have produced his celebrity and relevance. He also lays out a real agenda for change for the new presidential administration, one that addresses the recent failures of democratic politics.

The Color of Crime

Author: Katheryn Russell-Brown

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814776179

Category: Social Science

Page: 213

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America is the most punitive nation in the world, incarcerating more than 2.3 million people—or one in 136 of its residents. Against the backdrop of this unprecedented mass imprisonment, punishment permeates everyday life, carrying with it complex cultural meanings. In The Culture of Punishment, Michelle Brown goes beyond prison gates and into the routine and popular engagements of everyday life, showing that those of us most distanced from the practice of punishment tend to be particularly harsh in our judgments. The Culture of Punishment takes readers on a tour of the sites where culture and punishment meet—television shows, movies, prison tourism, and post 9/11 new war prisons—demonstrating that because incarceration affects people along distinct race and class lines, it is only a privileged group of citizens who are removed from the experience of incarceration. These penal spectators, who often sanction the infliction of pain from a distance, risk overlooking the reasons for democratic oversight of the project of punishment and, more broadly, justifications for the prohibition of pain.

The Color of Wealth

The Story Behind the U.S. Racial Wealth Divide

Author: Barbara Robles,Betsy Leondar-Wright,Rose Brewer

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585621

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 547

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For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.

American Pogrom

The East St. Louis Race Riot and Black Politics

Author: Charles L. Lumpkins

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821418033

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 7989

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On July 2 and 3, 1917, race riots rocked the small industrial city of East St. Louis, Illinois. American Pogrom takes the reader beyond that pivotal time in the city’s history to explore black people’s activism from the antebellum era to the eve of the post–World War II civil rights movement. Lumpkins asserts that the race riots were a pogrom—an organized massacre of a particular ethnic group—orchestrated by certain businessmen intent on preventing black residents from attaining political power and on turning the city into a “sundown” town permanently cleared of African Americans, he also demonstrates how the African American community survived. He situates the activities of the black citizens of East St. Louis in the context of the larger story of the African American quest for freedom, citizenship, and equality.

A People s History of Poverty in America

Author: Stephen Pimpare

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595586962

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 629

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In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong

Author: James W. Loewen

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595586539

Category: Education

Page: 444

View: 4387

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A completely revised edition of James W. Loewen’s classic retelling of American history, based on six new textbooks and including an all-new chapter on the recent past Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has gone on to win an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship, and has sold over a million copies in its various editions. What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls "an extremely convincing plea for truth in education." In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, and the My Lai massacre, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students. This new edition also features a handsome new cover and a new introduction by the author.

Old Islam in Detroit

Rediscovering the Muslim American Past

Author: Sally Howell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199372020

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1381

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Across North America, Islam is portrayed as a religion of immigrants, converts, and cultural outsiders. Yet Muslims have been part of American society for much longer than most people realize. This book documents the history of Islam in Detroit, a city that is home to several of the nation's oldest, most diverse Muslim communities. In the early 1900s, there were thousands of Muslims in Detroit. Most came from Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and British India. In 1921, they built the nation's first mosque in Highland Park. By the 1930s, new Islam-oriented social movements were taking root among African Americans in Detroit. By the 1950s, Albanians, Arabs, African Americans, and South Asians all had mosques and religious associations in the city, and they were confident that Islam could be, and had already become, an American religion. When immigration laws were liberalized in 1965, new immigrants and new African American converts rapidly became the majority of U.S. Muslims. For them, Detroit's old Muslims and their mosques seemed oddly Americanized, even unorthodox. Old Islam in Detroit explores the rise of Detroit's earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, Old Islam in Detroit provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life. It shows how Islam has become American in the past and how the anxieties many new Muslim Americans and non-Muslims feel about the place of Islam in American society today are not inevitable, but are part of a dynamic process of political and religious change that is still unfolding.

From Coveralls to Zoot Suits

The Lives of Mexican American Women on the World War II Home Front

Author: Elizabeth R. Escobedo

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469602067

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

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During World War II, unprecedented employment avenues opened up for women and minorities in U.S. defense industries at the same time that massive population shifts and the war challenged Americans to rethink notions of race. At this extraordinary historical moment, Mexican American women found new means to exercise control over their lives in the home, workplace, and nation. In From Coveralls to Zoot Suits, Elizabeth R. Escobedo explores how, as war workers and volunteers, dance hostesses and zoot suiters, respectable young ladies and rebellious daughters, these young women used wartime conditions to serve the United States in its time of need and to pursue their own desires. But even after the war, as Escobedo shows, Mexican American women had to continue challenging workplace inequities and confronting family and communal resistance to their broadening public presence. Highlighting seldom heard voices of the "Greatest Generation," Escobedo examines these contradictions within Mexican families and their communities, exploring the impact of youth culture, outside employment, and family relations on the lives of women whose home-front experiences and everyday life choices would fundamentally alter the history of a generation.

Southeastern Geographer

Winter 2012 Issue

Author: David M. Cochran Jr.,Carl A. Reese

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080787261X

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

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Table of Contents for Volume 52, Number 4 (Winter 2012) Special Issue: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Guest Editor: Chris W. Post Cover Art The Mule Pull at the Mississippi Pecan Festival Joseph S. Miller Introduction: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Chris W. Post Part I: Papers ''History by the Spoonful'' in North Carolina: The Textual Politics of State Highway Historical Markers Derek H. Alderman Remembrance and Place-Making: Teaching Students to Look Ahead While Looking Back Stephen S. Birdsall Editing Memory and Automobility & Race: Two Learning Activities on Contested Heritage and Place Kenneth E. Foote A Tale of Two Civil War Statues: Teaching the Geographies of Memory and Heritage in Norfolk, Virginia Jonathan I. Leib Objectives and Prospects for Bringing Service-Learning into the Memory and Heritage Classroom Chris W. Post Making Memory, Making Landscapes: Classroom Applications of Parallel Trends in the Study of Landscape, Memory, and Learning Owen J. Dwyer and Matthew McCourt Part II: Geographical Notes A Tribute to Dr. Louis De Vorsey, Jr. (1929–2012) Sanford H. Bederman Part III: Reviews From Chicaza to Chickasaw: The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540–1715 Robbie Ethridge Reviewed by Craig S. Revels Key Methods in Geography Nicholas Clifford, Shaun French, and Gill Valentine (Editors) Reviewed by Bandana Kar

The Reapers

A Charlie Parker Thriller

Author: John Connolly

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416570055

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 9899

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Darkly brilliant and intuitive private detective Charlie Parker returns in the next thrilling installment of the New York Times bestselling series by John Connolly about an elite group of killers. The Reapers are the elite of killers, the best at their trade, and Louis, confidante of troubled private detective Charlie Parker, is one of their number. Now the sins of his past are about to be visited upon him, for someone is hunting Louis, targeting his home, his businesses, and his partner, Angel. The instrument of his revenge is Bliss, the killer of killers, the most feared of assasins, and a man with a personal vendetta against Louis. But when Louis and Angel decide to strike back, they disappear, and their friends are forced to band together to find them. They are led by Parker, a killer himself, a reaper in waiting... The harvest is about to begin.

The Crisis

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: N.A

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Der goldene Sohn

Roman

Author: Shilpi Somaya Gowda

Publisher: Kiepenheuer & Witsch

ISBN: 3462315196

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 395

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Zwischen zwei Welten – ist deine Freiheit wichtiger als deine Familie? Anil wächst wohlbehütet im Kreis einer großen Familie in einem indischen Dorf auf. Als ältester Sohn soll er später die Rolle des Familienoberhaupts und Schiedsmanns einnehmen und Streitigkeiten in der Dorfgemeinschaft schlichten. Leena ist seine beste Freundin. Ein mutiges Mädchen und draufgängerischer Wildfang, das seine Familie und die freie Natur über alles liebt. In ihrer Kindheit sind Anil und Leena ein unzertrennliches Gespann, doch dann führen ihre Wege in verschiedene Richtungen. Anil verlässt das Dorf, um Medizin zu studieren und in den USA als Arzt zu arbeiten. Er genießt sein neues Leben dort und verliebt sich Hals über Kopf in eine Amerikanerin. Leena bleibt in Indien, heiratet und zieht zu der Familie ihres Mannes. Anils Leben gerät aus den Fugen: Ihm unterläuft ein schwerer medizinischer Fehler, seine Beziehung zerbricht und er stürzt in eine Krise. Bei einem Besuch in seiner Heimat trifft er Leena wieder, die Frau, die ihn besser kennt als jeder andere. Aber zwischen ihnen steht eine Entscheidung, die Jahre zuvor getroffen wurde. Bewegend, mitreißend, klug – Shilpi Somaya Gowdas glänzend erzählter neuer Roman ist eine ergreifende Geschichte über Unabhängigkeit und Liebe.