The Anatomy of Racial Inequality

Author: Glenn C. LOURY,Glenn C Loury

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674040325

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 5051

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Speaking wisely and provocatively about the political economy of race, Glenn Loury has become one of our most prominent black intellectuals--and, because of his challenges to the orthodoxies of both left and right, one of the most controversial. A major statement of a position developed over the past decade, this book both epitomizes and explains Loury's understanding of the depressed conditions of so much of black society today--and the origins, consequences, and implications for the future of these conditions. Using an economist's approach, Loury describes a vicious cycle of tainted social information that has resulted in a self-replicating pattern of racial stereotypes that rationalize and sustain discrimination. His analysis shows how the restrictions placed on black development by stereotypical and stigmatizing racial thinking deny a whole segment of the population the possibility of self-actualization that American society reveres--something that many contend would be undermined by remedies such as affirmative action. On the contrary, this book persuasively argues that the promise of fairness and individual freedom and dignity will remain unfulfilled without some forms of intervention based on race. Brilliant in its account of how racial classifications are created and perpetuated, and how they resonate through the social, psychological, spiritual, and economic life of the nation, this compelling and passionate book gives us a new way of seeing--and, perhaps, seeing beyond--the damning categorization of race in America.

The Anatomy of Racial Inequality

Author: Glenn C. LOURY,Glenn C Loury

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674040328

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 2865

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Speaking wisely and provocatively about the political economy of race, Glenn Loury has become one of our most prominent black intellectuals--and, because of his challenges to the orthodoxies of both left and right, one of the most controversial. A major statement of a position developed over the past decade, this book both epitomizes and explains Loury's understanding of the depressed conditions of so much of black society today--and the origins, consequences, and implications for the future of these conditions. Using an economist's approach, Loury describes a vicious cycle of tainted social information that has resulted in a self-replicating pattern of racial stereotypes that rationalize and sustain discrimination. His analysis shows how the restrictions placed on black development by stereotypical and stigmatizing racial thinking deny a whole segment of the population the possibility of self-actualization that American society reveres--something that many contend would be undermined by remedies such as affirmative action. On the contrary, this book persuasively argues that the promise of fairness and individual freedom and dignity will remain unfulfilled without some forms of intervention based on race. Brilliant in its account of how racial classifications are created and perpetuated, and how they resonate through the social, psychological, spiritual, and economic life of the nation, this compelling and passionate book gives us a new way of seeing--and, perhaps, seeing beyond--the damning categorization of race in America.

The Anatomy of Racial Inequality

Author: Glenn C. LOURY

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Current Events

Page: 226

View: 2368

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"An account of how racial classifications are created and perpetuated and how they resonate through the social, psychological, spiritual and economic life of this nation."--cover.

Race, Incarceration, and American Values

Author: Glenn C. Loury,Pamela S. Karlan,Loïc Wacquant,Tommie Shelby

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262260948

Category: Political Science

Page: 96

View: 4658

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The United States, home to five percent of the world's population, now houses twenty-five percent of the world's prison inmates. Our incarceration rate -- at 714 per 100,000 residents and rising -- is almost forty percent greater than our nearest competitors (the Bahamas, Belarus, and Russia). More pointedly, it is 6.2 times the Canadian rate and 12.3 times the rate in Japan. Economist Glenn Loury argues that this extraordinary mass incarceration is not a response to rising crime rates or a proud success of social policy. Instead, it is the product of a generation-old collective decision to become a more punitive society. He connects this policy to our history of racial oppression, showing that the punitive turn in American politics and culture emerged in the post-civil rights years and has today become the main vehicle for the reproduction of racial hierarchies. Whatever the explanation, Loury argues, the uncontroversial fact is that changes in our criminal justice system since the 1970s have created a nether class of Americans -- vastly disproportionately black and brown -- with severely restricted rights and life chances. Moreover, conservatives and liberals agree that the growth in our prison population has long passed the point of diminishing returns. Stigmatizing and confining of a large segment of our population should be unacceptable to Americans. Loury's call to action makes all of us now responsible for ensuring that the policy changes.

The Economics of Race in the United States

Author: Brendan O'Flaherty

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674368185

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 478

View: 8227

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Brendan O’Flaherty brings the tools of economic analysis—incentives, equilibrium, optimization—to bear on racial issues. From health care, housing, and education, to employment, wealth, and crime, he shows how racial differences powerfully determine American lives, and how progress in one area is often constrained by diminishing returns in another.

White Men on Race

Power, Privilege, and the Shaping of Cultural Consciousness

Author: Joe R. Feagin,Eileen O'Brien

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807009833

Category: Social Science

Page: 275

View: 8025

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"White Men on Race illustrates the way privileged white men think about others; it is a major contribution to our understanding of racial privilege and its denial in our society." —Hernán Vera, author of Screen Saviors: Hollywood Fictions of Whiteness Based on the revealing and provocative testimony of approximately one hundred powerful, upper-income white men, White Men on Race shows how white men see racial "others," how they see white America, how they view racial conflicts, and what they expect for the future of the country. Covering a range of topics, from how they first encountered black Americans to views on black families, interracial dating, affirmative action, immigration, crime, and intervening in discriminatory situations, these hundred white men enlighten us on the racial perspectives of the country's white male elites as we enter the twenty-first century. "Pulitzer prize nominee Joe Feagin's tremendous body of work consistently has placed race, class, and gender at the center of analysis. Feagin has been a leading social scientist in this area and a scholar relentless in his focus on power, privilege, and issues of discrimination. White Men on Race adds to his voluminous oeuvre by providing penetrating insights into the range of racial attitudes of the upper class in the U.S. Here Feagin and O'Brien's compelling analysis of rare data is quite provocative and illuminating." —Dr. Bernice McNair Barnett, associate professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

When is Discrimination Wrong?

Author: Deborah Hellman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674027978

Category: Law

Page: 205

View: 8142

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A law requires black bus passengers to sit in the back of the bus. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves a drug for use by black heart failure patients. A state refuses to license drivers under age 16. A company avoids hiring women between the ages of 20 and 40. We routinely draw distinctions among people on the basis of characteristics that they possess or lack. While some distinctions are benign, many are morally troubling. In this boldly conceived book, Deborah Hellman develops a much-needed general theory of discrimination. She demonstrates that many familiar ideas about when discrimination is wrongâe"when it is motivated by prejudice, grounded in stereotypes, or simply departs from merit-based decision-makingâe"wonâe(tm)t adequately explain our widely shared intuitions. Hellman argues that, in the end, distinguishing among people on the basis of traits is wrong when it demeans any of the people affected. She deftly explores the question of how we determine what is in fact demeaning. Claims of wrongful discrimination are among the most common moral claims asserted in public and private life. Yet the roots of these claims are often left unanalyzed. When Is Discrimination Wrong? explores what it means to treat people as equals and thus takes up a central problem of democracy.

Economics, Values, and Organization

Author: Avner Ben-Ner,Louis Putterman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521774116

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 523

View: 3397

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In this path-breaking book, economists and scholars from diverse disciplines use standard economic tools to investigate the formation and evolution of normative preferences. The fundamental premise is that an adequate understanding of how an economy and society are organized and function cannot be reached without an understanding of the formation and mutation of values and preferences that determine how we interact with others. Its chapters explore the two-way interaction between economic arrangements or institutions, and preferences, including those regarding social status, the well-being of others, and ethical principles. Contributions have been written especially for this volume and are designed to address a wide readership in economics and other disciplines. The contributors are leading scholars who draw on such fields as game theory, economic history, the economics of institutions, and experimental economics, as well as political philosophy, sociology and psychology, to establish and explore their arguments.

America in Black and White

One Nation, Indivisible

Author: Stephan Thernstrom,Abigail Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439129098

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 9315

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In a book destined to become a classic, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom present important new information about the positive changes that have been achieved and the measurable improvement in the lives of the majority of African-Americans. Supporting their conclusions with statistics on education, earnings, and housing, they argue that the perception of serious racial divisions in this country is outdated -- and dangerous.

Beyond Discrimination

Racial Inequality in a Post-Racist Era

Author: Fredrick C. Harris,Robert C. Lieberman

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610448170

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 9751

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Nearly a half century after the civil rights movement, racial inequality remains a defining feature of American life. Along a wide range of social and economic dimensions, African Americans consistently lag behind whites. This troubling divide has persisted even as many of the obvious barriers to equality, such as state-sanctioned segregation and overt racial hostility, have markedly declined. How then can we explain the stubborn persistence of racial inequality? In Beyond Discrimination: Racial Inequality in a Post-Racist Era, a diverse group of scholars provides a more precise understanding of when and how racial inequality can occur without its most common antecedents, prejudice and discrimination. Beyond Discrimination focuses on the often hidden political, economic and historical mechanisms that now sustain the black-white divide in America. The first set of chapters examines the historical legacies that have shaped contemporary race relations. Desmond King reviews the civil rights movement to pinpoint why racial inequality became an especially salient issue in American politics. He argues that while the civil rights protests led the federal government to enforce certain political rights, such as the right to vote, addressing racial inequities in housing, education, and income never became a national priority. The volume then considers the impact of racial attitudes in American society and institutions. Phillip Goff outlines promising new collaborations between police departments and social scientists that will improve the measurement of racial bias in policing. The book finally focuses on the structural processes that perpetuate racial inequality. Devin Fergus discusses an obscure set of tax and insurance policies that, without being overtly racially drawn, penalizes residents of minority neighborhoods and imposes an economic handicap on poor blacks and Latinos. Naa Oyo Kwate shows how apparently neutral and apolitical market forces concentrate fast food and alcohol advertising in minority urban neighborhoods to the detriment of the health of the community. As it addresses the most pressing arenas of racial inequality, from education and employment to criminal justice and health, Beyond Discrimination exposes the unequal consequences of the ordinary workings of American society. It offers promising pathways for future research on the growing complexity of race relations in the United States.

Racial Stereotyping and Child Development

Author: D.T. Slaughter-Defoe

Publisher: Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers

ISBN: 3805599838

Category: Social Science

Page: 132

View: 1255

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In contemporary societies children’s racial identity is co-constructed in response to racial stereotyping with extended family, peers and teachers, and potent media sources. The studies in this volume take cognizance of earlier research into skin color and racial stereotyping, but advance its contemporary implications. Developmental trajectories of racial attitudes of Black and White children, examining recent empirical research from the perspective of theorizing associated with experimental studies of stereotyped-threat are discussed. Reviewed are also the theoretical and empirical role of media images in influencing the race-related images as well as the PVEST theoretical model in considering the significance of parental racial messages and stories. The last paper argues that youth can be victimized by racial/cultural stereotyping despite being majority-Black cultural members. Interdisciplinary commentaries by scholar-researchers are given for each chapter.Researchers, academicians, and practitioners will find in this publication a succinct update, inclusive of references and bibliographies, regarding the latest information in the development and socialization of racial attitudes and racial stereotyping.

Whitewashing Race

The Myth of a Color-Blind Society

Author: Michael K. Brown

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520237064

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

View: 7026

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The myth of a color-blind society is deconstructed in this powerful new look at race in America that consults sociologists, economists, criminologists, political scientists, and legal scholars in the search for answers to why so many white Americans think racism is no longer a problem. (Social Science)

Ethnicity, Social Mobility, and Public Policy

Comparing the USA and UK

Author: Glenn C. Loury,Tariq Modood,Steven M. Teles

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780521823098

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 643

View: 3352

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The first book to provide a comparative analysis of social mobility in the US and the UK.

Engaging Nature

Environmentalism and the Political Theory Canon

Author: Peter F. Cannavò,Joseph H. Lane Jr.,John Barry

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262526565

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 964

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Contemporary environmental political theory considers the implications of the environmental crisis for such political concepts as rights, citizenship, justice, democracy, the state, race, class, and gender. As the field has matured, scholars have begun to explore connections between Green Theory and such canonical political thinkers as Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, and Marx. The essays in this volume put important figures from the political theory canon in dialogue with current environmental political theory. It is the first comprehensive volume to bring the insights of Green Theory to bear in reinterpreting these canonical theorists.Individual essays cover such classical figures in Western thought as Aristotle, Hume, Rousseau, Mill, and Burke, but they also depart from the traditional canon to consider Mary Wollstonecraft, W. E. B. Du Bois, Hannah Arendt, and Confucius. Engaging and accessible, the essays also offer original and innovative interpretations that often challenge standard readings of these thinkers. In examining and explicating how these great thinkers of the past viewed the natural world and our relationship with nature, the essays also illuminate our current environmental predicament.Essays onPlato • Aristotle • Niccolò Machiavelli • Thomas Hobbes • John Locke • David Hume • Jean-Jacques Rousseau • Edmund Burke • Mary Wollstonecraft • John Stuart Mill • Karl Marx • W. E. B. Du Bois • Martin Heidegger • Hannah Arendt • Confucius ContributorsSheryl D. Breen, W. Scott Cameron, Peter F. Cannavò, Joel Jay Kassiola, Joseph H. Lane Jr. Timothy W. Luke, John M. Meyer, Özgüç Orhan, Barbara K. Seeber, Francisco Seijo, Kimberly K. Smith, Piers H. G. Stephens, Zev Trachtenberg, Andrew Valls, Harlan Wilson

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 052543285X

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 5518

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Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.

Equality Or Discrimination?

African Americans in the U.S. Military During the Vietnam War

Author: Natalie Kimbrough

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761836728

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 1846

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Equality or Discrimination? strives to close the gap in existing literature and address the often-neglected field of research on the discrimination of African Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces during the Vietnam War. Despite the awakened interest of academics, authors, artists, and experts from a multitude of fields and the vast selection of literature on the Vietnam War and its veterans, African Americans have received little attention until now. Based on initial findings, Dr. Kimbrough analyzes key issues including whether or not African Americans experienced racial discrimination while serving. The study also focuses on whether the Vietnam War was indeed the first fully integrated conflict in which the U.S. attempted to engage in militarily without racial division. The findings contradict the traditional image of equality in the U.S. Armed Forces and provide the basis for the dissertation. Proving that soldiers in the Vietnam War were NOT treated equally, Dr. Kimbrough argues that African Americans experienced various forms of discrimination during a tumultuous time in U.S. history in which the opposite treatment of its soldiers was required.

The Scholar Denied

W. E. B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology

Author: Aldon Morris

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520960483

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 965

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In this groundbreaking book, Aldon D. Morris’s ambition is truly monumental: to help rewrite the history of sociology and to acknowledge the primacy of W. E. B. Du Bois’s work in the founding of the discipline. Calling into question the prevailing narrative of how sociology developed, Morris, a major scholar of social movements, probes the way in which the history of the discipline has traditionally given credit to Robert E. Park at the University of Chicago, who worked with the conservative black leader Booker T. Washington to render Du Bois invisible. Morris uncovers the seminal theoretical work of Du Bois in developing a "scientific" sociology through a variety of methodologies and examines how the leading scholars of the day disparaged and ignored Du Bois’s work. The Scholar Denied is based on extensive, rigorous primary source research; the book is the result of a decade of research, writing, and revision. In exposing the economic and political factors that marginalized the contributions of Du Bois and enabled Park and his colleagues to be recognized as the "fathers" of the discipline, Morris delivers a wholly new narrative of American intellectual and social history that places one of America’s key intellectuals, W. E. B. Du Bois, at its center. The Scholar Denied is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, racial inequality, and the academy. In challenging our understanding of the past, the book promises to engender debate and discussion.

The Difference

How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies

Author: Scott E. Page

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400830282

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 456

View: 610

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In this landmark book, Scott Page redefines the way we understand ourselves in relation to one another. The Difference is about how we think in groups--and how our collective wisdom exceeds the sum of its parts. Why can teams of people find better solutions than brilliant individuals working alone? And why are the best group decisions and predictions those that draw upon the very qualities that make each of us unique? The answers lie in diversity--not what we look like outside, but what we look like within, our distinct tools and abilities. The Difference reveals that progress and innovation may depend less on lone thinkers with enormous IQs than on diverse people working together and capitalizing on their individuality. Page shows how groups that display a range of perspectives outperform groups of like-minded experts. Diversity yields superior outcomes, and Page proves it using his own cutting-edge research. Moving beyond the politics that cloud standard debates about diversity, he explains why difference beats out homogeneity, whether you're talking about citizens in a democracy or scientists in the laboratory. He examines practical ways to apply diversity's logic to a host of problems, and along the way offers fascinating and surprising examples, from the redesign of the Chicago "El" to the truth about where we store our ketchup. Page changes the way we understand diversity--how to harness its untapped potential, how to understand and avoid its traps, and how we can leverage our differences for the benefit of all.

Intellectual Property, Entrepreneurship and Social Justice

From Swords to Ploughshares

Author: Lateef Mtima

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1783470259

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 3474

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In the Information Age, historically marginalized groups and developing nations continue to strive for socio-economic empowerment within the global community. Their ultimate success largely depends upon their ability to develop, protect, and exploit th