The Black Prince of Florence

The Spectacular Life and Treacherous World of Alessandro De' Medici

Author: Catherine Fletcher

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019061272X

Category: Florence (Italy)

Page: 336

View: 1303

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"Ruler of Florence for seven bloody years, 1531 to 1537, Alessandro de' Medici was arguably the first person of color to serve as a head of state in the Western world. Born out of wedlock to a dark-skinned maid and Lorenzo de' Medici, he was the last legitimate heir to the line of Lorenzo the Magnificent. When Alessandro's noble father died of syphilis, the family looked to him. Groomed for power, he carved a path through the backstabbing world of Italian politics in a time when cardinals, popes, and princes vied for wealth and advantage. By the age of nineteen, he was prince of Florence, inheritor of the legacy of the grandest dynasty of the Italian Renaissance. Alessandro faced down family rivalry and enormous resistance from Florence's oligarchs, who called him a womanizer-which he undoubtedly was--and a tyrant. Yet this real-life counterpart to Machiavelli's Prince kept his grip on power until he was assassinated at the age of 26 during a late-night tryst arranged by his scheming cousins. After his death, his brief but colorful reign was criticized by those who had murdered him in a failed attempt to restore the Florentine republic. For the first time, the true story is told in The Black Prince of Florence. Catherine Fletcher tells the riveting tale of Alessandro's unexpected rise and spectacular fall, unraveling centuries-old mysteries, exposing forgeries, and bringing to life the epic personalities of the Medicis, Borgias, and others as they waged sordid campaigns to rise to the top. Drawing on new research and first-hand sources, this biography of a most intriguing Renaissance figure combines archival scholarship with discussions of race and class that are still relevant today."--Provided by publisher.

The Duke's Assassin

Exile and Death of Lorenzino De' Medici

Author: Stefano Dall'aglio

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300189788

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 4200

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Stefano Dall'Aglio sheds new light on the notorious Florentine Lorenzino de' Medici (also known as Lorenzaccio) and on two of the most infamous assassinations in Italian Renaissance history. In 1537 Lorenzino changed the course of history by murdering Alessandro de' Medici, first duke of Florence, and paving the way for the accession of the new duke, Cosimo I. In 1548 Lorenzino was killed in Venice in revenge for the assassination. The events surrounding these murders, which Dall'Aglio reconstructs, involved the Medici, their loyalists, Florentine republican exiles, and some of the most powerful sovereigns of the time. The first publication in a century to examine the life of Lorenzino de' Medici, and the first work in English, this fascinating revisionist history is based on extensive research in the historical archives of Florence and Simancas. The tale is as gripping as a detective novel, as Dall'Aglio unravels a 500-year-old mystery, revealing who was behind the bloody death of the duke's assassin: the emperor Charles V.

The Age of the Unthinkable

Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us And What We Can Do About It

Author: Joshua Cooper Ramo

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 9780316070010

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 3696

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Today the very ideas that made America great imperil its future. Our plans go awry and policies fail. History's grandest war against terrorism creates more terrorists. Global capitalism, intended to improve lives, increases the gap between rich and poor. Decisions made to stem a financial crisis guarantee its worsening. Environmental strategies to protect species lead to their extinction. The traditional physics of power has been replaced by something radically different. In The Age of the Unthinkable, Joshua Cooper Ramo puts forth a revelatory new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility.

Black Africans in Renaissance Europe

Author: K. J. P. Lowe

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521815826

Category: History

Page: 417

View: 2592

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This book, first published in 2005, opens up the much neglected area of the black African presence in Western Europe during the Renaissance. Covering history, literature, art history and anthropology, it investigates a whole range of black African experience and representation across Renaissance Europe, from various types of slavery to black musicians and dancers, from real and symbolic Africans at court to the view of the Catholic Church, and from writers of African descent to black African 'criminality'. The main purpose of the collection is to show the variety and complexity of black African life in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Europe, and how it was affected by firmly held preconceptions relating to the African continent and its inhabitants. Of enormous importance for both European and American history, this book mixes empirical material and theoretical approaches, and addresses such issues as stereotypes, changing black African identity, and cultural representation in art and literature.

When the World Seemed New

George H. W. Bush and the End of the Cold War

Author: Jeffrey A. Engel

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 054493184X

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 787

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The collapse of the Soviet Union was the greatest shock to international affairs since World War II. In that perilous moment, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait and regimes throughout Eastern Europe and Asia teetered between democratic change and new authoritarian rule. President Bush faced a world in turmoil that might easily have tipped into an epic crisis. As presidential historian Jeffrey Engel reveals in this page-turning history, Bush rose to the occasion brilliantly. Using handwritten letters and direct conversations—some revealed here for the first time—with heads of state throughout Asia and Europe, Bush knew when to push, when to cajole, and when to be patient. Based on previously classified documents, and interviews with all the principals, When the World Seemed New is a riveting, fly-on-the-wall account of a president with his calm hand on the tiller, guiding the nation from a moment of great peril to the pinnacle of global power. “An absorbing book.” — Wall Street Journal “Engel’s excellent history forms a standing—if unspoken—rebuke to the retrograde nationalism espoused by Donald J. Trump.” — New York Times Book Review

Black Victorians/Black Victoriana

Author: Gretchen Gerzina

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813532141

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 449

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Black Victorians/Black Victoriana is a welcome attempt to correct the historical record. Although scholarship has given us a clear view of nineteenth-century imperialism, colonialism, and later immigration from the colonies, there has for far too long been a gap in our understanding of the lives of blacks in Victorian England. Without that understanding, it remains impossible to assess adequately the state of the black population in Britain today. Using a transatlantic lens, the contributors to this book restore black Victorians to the British national picture. They look not just at the ways blacks were represented in popular culture but also at their lives as they experienced them--as workers, travelers, lecturers, performers, and professionals. Dozens of period photographs bring these stories alive and literally give a face to the individual stories the book tells. The essays taken as a whole also highlight prevailing Victorian attitudes toward race by focusing on the ways in which empire building spawned a "subculture of blackness" consisting of caricature, exhibition, representation, and scientific racism absorbed by society at large. This misrepresentation made it difficult to be both black and British while at the same time it helped to construct British identity as a whole. Covering many topics that detail the life of blacks during this period, Black Victorians/Black Victoriana will be a landmark contribution to the emergent field of black history in England.

The Divorce of Henry VIII

The Untold Story from Inside the Vatican

Author: Catherine Fletcher

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137000589

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 3832

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In 1533 the English monarch Henry VIII decided to divorce his wife of twenty years Catherine of Aragon in pursuit of a male heir to ensure the Tudor line. He was also head over heels in love with his wife's lady in waiting Anne Boleyn, the future mother of Elizabeth I. But getting his freedom involved a terrific web of intrigue through the enshrined halls of the Vatican that resulted in a religious schism and the formation of the Church of England. Henry's man in Rome was a wily Italian diplomat named Gregorio Casali who drew no limits on skullduggery including kidnapping, bribery and theft to make his king a free man. In this absorbing narrative, winner of the Rome Fellowship prize and University of Durham historian Catherine Fletcher draws on hundreds of previously-unknown Italian archive documents to tell the colorful tale from the inside story inside the Vatican.

Black Tudors

The Untold Story

Author: N.A

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1786071851

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7877

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Shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2018 A Book of the Year for the Evening Standard and the Observer A black porter publicly whips a white Englishman in the hall of a Gloucestershire manor house. A Moroccan woman is baptised in a London church. Henry VIII dispatches a Mauritanian diver to salvage lost treasures from the Mary Rose. From long-forgotten records emerge the remarkable stories of Africans who lived free in Tudor England... They were present at some of the defining moments of the age. They were christened, married and buried by the Church. They were paid wages like any other Tudors. The untold stories of the Black Tudors, dazzlingly brought to life by Kaufmann, will transform how we see this most intriguing period of history.

The Pope's Daughter

The Extraordinary Life of Felice della Rovere

Author: Caroline P. Murphy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199741151

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 3617

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The illegitimate daughter of Pope Julius II, Felice della Rovere became one of the most powerful and accomplished women of the Italian Renaissance. Now, Caroline Murphy vividly captures the untold story of a rare woman who moved with confidence through a world of popes and princes. Using a wide variety of sources, including Felice's personal correspondence, as well as diaries, account books, and chronicles of Renaissance Rome, Murphy skillfully weaves a compelling portrait of this remarkable woman. Felice della Rovere was to witness Michelangelo paint the Sistine Chapel, watch her father Pope Julius II lay the foundation stone for the new Saint Peter's, and see herself immortalized by Raphael in his Vatican frescos. With her marriage to Gian Giordano Orsini--arranged, though not attended, by her father the Pope--she came to possess great wealth and power, assets which she turned to her advantage. While her father lived, Felice exercised much influence in the affairs of Rome--even negotiating for peace with the Queen of France--and after his death, Felice persevered, making allies of the cardinals and clerics of St. Peter's and maintaining her control of the Orsini land through tenacity, ingenuity, and carefully cultivated political savvy. She survived the Sack of Rome in 1527, but her greatest enemy proved to be her own stepson Napoleone. The rivalry between him and her son Girolamo had a sudden and violent end, and brought her perilously close to losing everything she had spent her life acquiring. With a marvelous cast of characters, this is a spellbinding biography set against the brilliant backdrop of Renaissance Rome.

The Distant Marvels

A Novel

Author: Chantel Acevedo

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1609452623

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 1604

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Maria Sirena tells stories. She does it for money—she was a favorite in the cigar factory where she worked as a lettora—and for love, spinning gossamer tales out of her own past for the benefit of friends, neighbors, and family. But now, like a modern-day Scheherazade, she will be asked to tell one last story so that eight women can keep both hope and themselves alive. Cuba, 1963. Hurricane Flora, one of the deadliest hurricanes in recorded history, is bearing down on the island. Seven women have been forcibly evacuated from their homes and herded into the former governor’s mansion, where they are watched over by another woman, a young soldier of Castro’s new Cuba named Ofelia. Outside the storm is raging and the floodwaters are rising. In a single room on the top floor of the governor’s mansion, Maria Sirena begins to tell the incredible story of her childhood during Cuba’s Third War of Independence; of her father Augustin, a ferocious rebel; of her mother, Lulu, an astonishing woman who fought, loved, dreamed, and suffered as fiercely as her husband. Stories, however, have a way of taking on a life of their own, and transported by her story’s momentum, Maria Sirena will reveal more about herself than she or anyone ever expected. Chantel Acevedo’s The Distant Marvels is an epic adventure tale, a family saga, a love story, a stunning historical account of armed struggle against oppressors, and a long tender plea for forgiveness. It is, finally, a life-affirming novel about the kind of love that lasts a lifetime and the very art of storytelling itself.

The Inner Lives of Markets

How People Shape Them?And They Shape Us

Author: Ray Fisman,Tim Sullivan

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610394933

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 8966

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What is a market? To most people it is a shopping center or an abstract space in which stock prices vary minutely. In reality, a market is something much more fundamental to being human, and it affects not just the price of tomatoes but the boundaries of everything we value. Reading the newspapers these days, you could be forgiven for thinking that markets are getting ever more efficient—and better. But as Tim Sullivan and Ray Fisman argue in this insightful book, that view is far from complete. For one thing, efficiency isn't always a good thing—illegal markets are very often more efficient than legal ones, because they are free of concern for laws and human rights. But even more importantly, the chatter about efficiency has obscured a much broader conversation about what kind of economic exchange we actually want. Every regulation, every sticker price, and every sale is part of an ever-changing ecosystem—one that affects us as much as we affect it. By tracing 50 years of economic thought on this subject, Fisman and Sullivan show how markets have evolved—and how we can keep making them better. This leads to fascinating and surprising insights, such as: Why your $10,000 used car is likely to sell for $2,000 or less; Why you should think twice before buying batteries on Amazon; and Why it's essential that healthy people buy medical insurance. In the end, The Inner Lives of Markets argues for a new way of thinking about how you spend your money—it shows that every transaction you make is part of a grand social experiment. We are all guinea pigs running through a lab maze, and the sooner we realize it, the more effectively we can navigate the path we want.

Tuscan Countess

Author: Michele K. Spike

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 0865652813

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 3755

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This is a fast-paced and colorful exploration of the life of Matilda of Canossa (c. 1046û1115), the woman who loved a pope and was loved by him, successfully defied the Holy Roman Emperor, and changed the map of Europe. A new kind of history, this biography also carries the flavor of present-day Italy. Matilda of Canossa, the ôGreat Countess,ö was a remarkable woman. Her personal power was so extraordinary that even centuries after her death she became the first woman to be interred in St. Peter's Basilica. She is best remembered for her role in the conflict between the papacy and the Holy Roman emperor, the climax of which took place at her castle of Canossa. This unique biography is also a journal of the author's travels through contemporary Tuscany as she explores the palaces where Matilda held court, the blood-stained plains on which her soldiers battled, the churches and cathedrals she endowed, and the fortified aeries where she sought refuge. Readers will be swept along on this engrossing journey retracing the steps of a courageous and brilliant woman.

The Art of Woo

Using Strategic Persuasion to Sell Your Ideas

Author: G. Richard Shell,Mario Moussa

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781591841760

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 312

View: 4487

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Explains that the selling of ideas is a matter of encouraging others to share one's beliefs in a guide for salespeople that invites readers to self-assess their persuasion personality and build on natural strengths.

The Medici: Power, Money, and Ambition in the Italian Renaissance

Author: Paul Strathern

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681771136

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 1188

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A vivid, dramatic, and authoritative account of perhaps the most influential family in Italian history: the Medici. A dazzling history of the modest family that rose to become one of the most powerful in Europe, The Medici is a remarkably modern story of power, money, and ambition. Against the background of an age that saw the rebirth of ancient and classical learning Paul Strathern explores the intensely dramatic rise and fall of the Medici family in Florence, as well as the Italian Renaissance which they did so much to sponsor and encourage. Strathern also follows the lives of many of the great Renaissance artists with whom the Medici had dealings, including Leonardo, Michelangelo and Donatello; as well as scientists like Galileo and Pico della Mirandola; and the fortunes of those members of the Medici family who achieved success away from Florence, including the two Medici popes and Catherine de' Médicis, who became Queen of France and played a major role in that country through three turbulent reigns.

The Family Medici: The Hidden History of the Medici Dynasty

Author: Mary Hollingsworth

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 168177710X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 5799

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A fresh, revelatory, and shockingly revisionist narrative of the rise and fall of the House of Medici, by the acclaimed author of The Cardinal’s Hat and The Borgias. Having founded the bank that became the most powerful in Europe in the fifteenth century, the Medici gained massive political power in Florence, raising the city to a peak of cultural achievement and becoming its hereditary dukes. Among their number were no fewer than three popes and a powerful and influential queen of France. Their influence brought about an explosion of Florentine art and architecture. Michelangelo, Donatello, Fra Angelico, and Leonardo were among the artists with whom they were socialized and patronized. Thus runs the "accepted view” of the Medici. However, Mary Hollingsworth argues that the idea that the Medici were enlightened rulers of the Renaissance is a fiction that has now acquired the status of historical fact. In truth, the Medici were as devious and immoral as the Borgias—tyrants loathed in the city they illegally made their own. In this dynamic new history, Hollingsworth argues that past narratives have focused on a sanitized and fictitious view of the Medici—wise rulers, enlightened patrons of the arts, and fathers of the Renaissance—but that in fact their past was reinvented in the sixteenth century, mythologized by later generations of Medici who used this as a central prop for their legacy. Hollingsworth's revelatory re-telling of the story of the family Medici brings a fresh and exhilarating new perspective to the story behind the most powerful family of the Italian Renaissance.

The Indomitable Chiesa di Santa Maria

Author: Daniel Peltz

Publisher: Book Guild Publishing

ISBN: 1912362635

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 3790

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This historical novel is focussed around a church located in Florence, and what happens to it through different periods of history. The story starts in the present day, with a tour guide taking a family around a museum that originally was the church. The tour guide, Molly Cavendish is the present day link, and as the story changes from the past to the present day, she asks the questions as well as proving the answers to what happened to the “Chiesa di Santa Maria” during its history. The museum houses the finest Renaissance fresco by Masaccio. Daniel Peltz shares the story of the construction of the church during the early 15th Century. This is a tragic story of one man’s quest using the brightest and the best talent in Florence of that age. Through time we see the trials and tribulations of the church dating through the Napoleonic War, World War Two and the Florentine Floods of 1966; and the end of the story is based in the present day. Author Daniel Peltz lives in London and is CEO of London Freeholds Ltd. He is an Honorary Fellow of King’s College and Birkbeck College and sits on King’s Campaign Board and on the Estate Committee for both colleges. He is Chairman of Technion UK and Treasurer of The Anna Freud Centre. Daniel is a Trustee of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies at Oxford University, The City of London School Bursary Trust, The Institute of Jewish Studies at UCL, and Childhood First. He is a panellist on the Education Panel of the Wolfson Foundation, and sits on the Finance and Estates Committees of the MCC. In 2015, Daniel was awarded the OBE for Philanthropic and Charitable services.

The Seventh Sense

Power, Fortune, and Survival in the Age of Networks

Author: Joshua Cooper Ramo

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316285048

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5942

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER WASHINGTON POST BESTSELLER Winner of the getAbstract 17th International Book Award "The Seventh Sense is a concept every businessman, diplomat, or student should aspire to master--a powerful idea, backed by stories and figures that will be impossible to forget." -- Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs and Leonardo da Vinci Endless terror. Refugee waves. An unfixable global economy. Surprising election results. New billion-dollar fortunes. Miracle medical advances. What if they were all connected? What if you could understand why? The Seventh Sense is the story of what all of today's successful figures see and feel: the forces that are invisible to most of us but explain everything from explosive technological change to uneasy political ripples. The secret to power now is understanding our new age of networks. Not merely the Internet, but also webs of trade, finance, and even DNA. Based on his years of advising generals, CEOs, and politicians, Ramo takes us into the opaque heart of our world's rapidly connected systems and teaches us what the losers are not yet seeing--and what the victors of this age already know.

Nec(Romantic)

Author: Cathleen Chambless

Publisher: Gorilla Press

ISBN: 9780991450923

Category: Poetry

Page: 98

View: 6367

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Poetry. LGBTQ Studies. Latino/Latina Studies. NEC (ROMANTIC) is the death of classic Romanticism, the notion of the way things should be and should have been, the death of the trope "hopeless romantic." From the first poem a transformation of the artist begins, the shedding of the old self in to a new beginning in which Cathleen knows the path, and illuminates a trail for the reader to follow. NEC(ROMANTIC) is the death of the ideal, the binary conventions between the American Dream fantasy and the fraction of its mentality of "only this one way." Using confessional styles mixed with classical poetry archetypes, Cathleen's true force is the power to forgive oneself while never forgetting how she, as the person and the artist, got to where she is; how a person can hold on to love while losing the one they love.

The Ugly Renaissance

Sex, Greed, Violence and Depravity in an Age of Beauty

Author: Alexander Lee

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0385536607

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 3562

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A fascinating and counterintuitive portrait of the sordid, hidden world behind the dazzling artwork of Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, and more Renowned as a period of cultural rebirth and artistic innovation, the Renaissance is cloaked in a unique aura of beauty and brilliance. Its very name conjures up awe-inspiring images of an age of lofty ideals in which life imitated the fantastic artworks for which it has become famous. But behind the vast explosion of new art and culture lurked a seamy, vicious world of power politics, perversity, and corruption that has more in common with the present day than anyone dares to admit. In this lively and meticulously researched portrait, Renaissance scholar Alexander Lee illuminates the dark and titillating contradictions that were hidden beneath the surface of the period’s best-known artworks. Rife with tales of scheming bankers, greedy politicians, sex-crazed priests, bloody rivalries, vicious intolerance, rampant disease, and lives of extravagance and excess, this gripping exploration of the underbelly of Renaissance Italy shows that, far from being the product of high-minded ideals, the sublime monuments of the Renaissance were created by flawed and tormented artists who lived in an ever-expanding world of inequality, dark sexuality, bigotry, and hatred. The Ugly Renaissance is a delightfully debauched journey through the surprising contradictions of Italy’s past and shows that were it not for the profusion of depravity and degradation, history’s greatest masterpieces might never have come into being. From the Hardcover edition.

Isabella de'Medici

The Glorious Life and Tragic End of a Renaissance Princess

Author: Caroline P. Murphy

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571266053

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4446

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Isabella de' Medici was the hostess of a glittering circle in Renaissance Florence. Beautiful and liberated, she not only matched the intellectual accomplishments of her male contemporaries, but sought sexual parity also, engaging in an adulterous affair with her husband's cousin. It was this affair - and her very success as First Lady of Florence - that led to her death at the hands of her husband at the age of just thirty-four. She left behind a remarkable story, and as her legacy a son who became the best of the Orsini Dukes, immortalised by Shakespeare as Duke Orsino in Twelfth Night. Caroline P. Murphy illuminates this often misunderstood figure, and in the process brings to life the home of creativity, the city of Florence itself.