The Body Project

An Intimate History of American Girls

Author: Joan Jacobs Brumberg

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307755742

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

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A hundred years ago, women were lacing themselves into corsets and teaching their daughters to do the same. The ideal of the day, however, was inner beauty: a focus on good deeds and a pure heart. Today American women have more social choices and personal freedom than ever before. But fifty-three percent of our girls are dissatisfied with their bodies by the age of thirteen, and many begin a pattern of weight obsession and dieting as early as eight or nine. Why? In The Body Project, historian Joan Jacobs Brumberg answers this question, drawing on diary excerpts and media images from 1830 to the present. Tracing girls' attitudes toward topics ranging from breast size and menstruation to hair, clothing, and cosmetics, she exposes the shift from the Victorian concern with character to our modern focus on outward appearance—in particular, the desire to be model-thin and sexy. Compassionate, insightful, and gracefully written, The Body Project explores the gains and losses adolescent girls have inherited since they shed the corset and the ideal of virginity for a new world of sexual freedom and consumerism—a world in which the body is their primary project.

Why Gender Matters

What Parents and Teachers Need to Know about the Emerging Science of Sex Differe nces

Author: Leonard Sax, M.D., Ph.D.

Publisher: Harmony

ISBN: 0307419584

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 336

View: 6392

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Are boys and girls really that different? Twenty years ago, doctors and researchers didn’t think so. Back then, most experts believed that differences in how girls and boys behave are mainly due to differences in how they were treated by their parents, teachers, and friends. It's hard to cling to that belief today. An avalanche of research over the past twenty years has shown that sex differences are more significant and profound than anybody guessed. Sex differences are real, biologically programmed, and important to how children are raised, disciplined, and educated. In Why Gender Matters, psychologist and family physician Dr. Leonard Sax leads parents through the mystifying world of gender differences by explaining the biologically different ways in which children think, feel, and act. He addresses a host of issues, including discipline, learning, risk taking, aggression, sex, and drugs, and shows how boys and girls react in predictable ways to different situations. For example, girls are born with more sensitive hearing than boys, and those differences increase as kids grow up. So when a grown man speaks to a girl in what he thinks is a normal voice, she may hear it as yelling. Conversely, boys who appear to be inattentive in class may just be sitting too far away to hear the teacher—especially if the teacher is female. Likewise, negative emotions are seated in an ancient structure of the brain called the amygdala. Girls develop an early connection between this area and the cerebral cortex, enabling them to talk about their feelings. In boys these links develop later. So if you ask a troubled adolescent boy to tell you what his feelings are, he often literally cannot say. Dr. Sax offers fresh approaches to disciplining children, as well as gender-specific ways to help girls and boys avoid drugs and early sexual activity. He wants parents to understand and work with hardwired differences in children, but he also encourages them to push beyond gender-based stereotypes. A leading proponent of single-sex education, Dr. Sax points out specific instances where keeping boys and girls separate in the classroom has yielded striking educational, social, and interpersonal benefits. Despite the view of many educators and experts on child-rearing that sex differences should be ignored or overcome, parents and teachers would do better to recognize, understand, and make use of the biological differences that make a girl a girl, and a boy a boy.

Fasting Girls

The Emergence of Anorexia Nervosa As a Modern Disease

Author: Joan Jacobs Brumberg

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 7934

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Traces the historic roots of anorexia nervosa from its emergence during the Victorian era to its pervasiveness in the twentieth century and explores the cultural significance of appetite control in women's lives

Monstrous Bodies

Feminine Power in Young Adult Horror Fiction

Author: June Pulliam

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786475439

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 3474

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Recent works of young adult fantastic fiction such as Stephenie Meyer's Twilight Saga have been criticized for glamorizing feminine subordination. But YA horror fiction with female protagonists who have paranormal abilities suggests a resistance to restrictive gender roles. The "monstrous Other" is a double with a difference, a metaphor of the Western adolescent girl pressured to embody an untenable doll-like feminine ideal. This book examines what each of three types of female monstrous Others in young adult fiction--the haunted girl, the female werewolf and the witch--has to tell us about feminine subordination in a supposedly post-feminist world, where girls continue to be pressured to silence their voices and stifle their desires.

Plucked

A History of Hair Removal

Author: Rebecca M. Herzig

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479840823

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 280

View: 7483

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A cultural historian explores the history of Americans' changing attitudes towards hair removal, discussing how it was once viewed as a “mutilation” practiced by “savage” men to being expected of women, lest they be viewed as mentally ill or sexually deviant.

Sex Goes to School

Girls and Sex Education before the 1960s

Author: Susan K. Freeman

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252091280

Category: History

Page: 240

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When seeking approaches for sex education, few look to the past for guidance. But Susan K. Freeman's investigation of the classrooms of the 1940s and 1950s offers numerous insights into the potential for sex education to address adolescent challenges, particularly for girls. From rural Toms River, New Jersey, to urban San Diego and many places in between, the use of discussion-based classes fostered an environment that focused less on strictly biological matters of human reproduction and more on the social dimensions of the gendered and sexual worlds that the students inhabited. Although the classes reinforced normative heterosexual gender roles that could prove repressive, the discussion-based approach also emphasized a potentially liberating sense of personal choice and responsibility in young women's relationship decisions. In addition to the biological and psychological underpinnings of normative sexuality, teachers presented girls' sex lives and gendered behavior as critical to the success of American families and, by extension, the entire way of life of American democracy. The approaches of teachers and students were sometimes predictable and other times surprising, yet almost wholly without controversy in the two decades before the so-called Sexual Revolution of the 1960s. Sex Goes to School illuminates the tensions between and among adults and youth attempting to make sense of sex in a society that was then, as much as today, both sex-phobic and sex-saturated.

The Strange History of Suzanne LaFleshe and Other Stories of Women and Fatness

Author: Susan Koppelman

Publisher: Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN: 9781558614512

Category: Fiction

Page: 278

View: 2857

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Spanning a century, from Kate Chopin and Fannie Hurst to J. California Cooper and Elana Dykewomon, this bold and deeply satisfying anthology of women's stories explores women's relationships to, and perceptions of, their physical selves. Addressing the peculiarities, the pleasures, and the shames of body politics, these stories of bodies that refuse to be contained offer a variety of perspectives on fully inhabiting the flesh. Whether celebrating bodies deemed transgressive or simply daring to acknowledge that such bodies exist, these diverse literary representations of fatness render the excessive body brilliantly, unapologetically visible. Book jacket.

Mystics, Mavericks, and Merrymakers

An Intimate Journey among Hasidic Girls

Author: Stephanie Wellen Levine

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814752403

Category: Social Science

Page: 255

View: 7161

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From the ardently religious young woman who longs for the life of a male scholar to the young rebel who visits a strip club, smokes pot, and agonizes over her loss of faith to the proud Lubavitcher with a desire for a high-powered career, Stephanie Wellen Levine provides a rare glimpse into the inner worlds and daily lives of these Hasidic girls. Lubavitcher Hasidim are famous for their efforts to inspire secular Jews to become more observant and for their messianic fervor. Strict followers of Orthodox Judaism, they maintain sharp gender-role distinctions. Levine spent a year living in the Lubavitch community of Crown Heights, Brooklyn, participating in the rhythms of Hasidic girlhood. Drawing on many intimate hours among Hasidim and over 30 in-depth interviews, Mystics, Mavericks, and Merrymakers offers rich portraits of individual Hasidic young women and how they deal with the conflicts between the regimented society in which they live and the pull of mainstream American life. This superbly crafted book offers intimate stories from Hasidic teenagers' lives, providing an intriguing twist to a universal theme: the struggle to grow up and define who we are within the context of culture, family, and life-driving beliefs.

Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History

Author: Patrizia Gentile,Jane Nicholas

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442663162

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 5403

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From fur coats to nude paintings, and from sports to beauty contests, the body has been central to the literal and figurative fashioning of ourselves as individuals and as a nation. In this first collection on the history of the body in Canada, an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the multiple ways the body has served as a site of contestation in Canadian history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Showcasing a variety of methodological approaches, Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History includes essays on many themes that engage with the larger historical relationship between the body and nation: medicine and health, fashion and consumer culture, citizenship and work, and more. The contributors reflect on the intersections of bodies with the concept of nationhood, as well as how understandings of the body are historically contingent. The volume is capped off with a critical introductory chapter by the editors on the history of bodies and the development of the body as a category of analysis.

The Girls' History and Culture Reader

The Twentieth Century

Author: Miriam Forman-Brunell,Leslie Paris

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252077687

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 4486

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A pioneering, field-defining collection of essential texts exploring girlhood in the twentieth century

Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Carla Bittel

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606445

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 8393

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In the late nineteenth century, as Americans debated the "woman question," a battle over the meaning of biology arose in the medical profession. Some medical men claimed that women were naturally weak, that education would make them physically ill, and that women physicians endangered the profession. Mary Putnam Jacobi (1842-1906), a physician from New York, worked to prove them wrong and argued that social restrictions, not biology, threatened female health. Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America is the first full-length biography of Mary Putnam Jacobi, the most significant woman physician of her era and an outspoken advocate for women's rights. Jacobi rose to national prominence in the 1870s and went on to practice medicine, teach, and conduct research for over three decades. She campaigned for co-education, professional opportunities, labor reform, and suffrage--the most important women's rights issues of her day. Downplaying gender differences, she used the laboratory to prove that women were biologically capable of working, learning, and voting. Science, she believed, held the key to promoting and producing gender equality. Carla Bittel's biography of Jacobi offers a piercing view of the role of science in nineteenth-century women's rights movements and provides historical perspective on continuing debates about gender and science today.

A Feeling of Belonging

Asian American Women's Public Culture, 1930-1960

Author: Shirley Jennifer Lim

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814751938

Category: History

Page: 241

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When we imagine the activities of Asian American women in the mid-twentieth century, our first thoughts are not of skiing, beauty pageants, magazine reading, and sororities. Yet, Shirley Jennifer Lim argues, these are precisely the sorts of leisure practices many second generation Chinese, Filipina, and Japanese American women engaged in during this time. In A Feeling of Belonging, Lim highlights the cultural activities of young, predominantly unmarried Asian American women from 1930 to 1960. This period marks a crucial generation—the first in which American-born Asians formed a critical mass and began to make their presence felt in the United States. Though they were distinguished from previous generations by their American citizenship, it was only through these seemingly mundane “American”activities that they were able to overcome two-dimensional stereotypes of themselves as kimono-clad “Orientals.” Lim traces the diverse ways in which these young women sought claim to cultural citizenship, exploring such topics as the nation's first Asian American sorority, Chi Alpha Δ the cultural work of Chinese American actress Anna May Wong; Asian American youth culture and beauty pageants; and the achievement of fame of three foreign-born Asian women in the late 1950s. By wearing poodle skirts, going to the beach, and producing magazines, she argues, they asserted not just their American-ness, but their humanity: a feeling of belonging.

The Clubwomen's Daughters

Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl's Fiction, 1890-1940

Author: Gwen Tarbox

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131777602X

Category: History

Page: 256

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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Ain't I a Beauty Queen?

Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race

Author: Maxine Leeds Craig

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199881677

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 2279

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"Black is Beautiful!" The words were the exuberant rallying cry of a generation of black women who threw away their straightening combs and adopted a proud new style they called the Afro. The Afro, as worn most famously by Angela Davis, became a veritable icon of the Sixties. Although the new beauty standards seemed to arise overnight, they actually had deep roots within black communities. Tracing her story to 1891, when a black newspaper launched a contest to find the most beautiful woman of the race, Maxine Leeds Craig documents how black women have negotiated the intersection of race, class, politics, and personal appearance in their lives. Craig takes the reader from beauty parlors in the 1940s to late night political meetings in the 1960s to demonstrate the powerful influence of social movements on the experience of daily life. With sources ranging from oral histories of Civil Rights and Black Power Movement activists and men and women who stood on the sidelines to black popular magazines and the black movement press, Ain't I a Beauty Queen? will fascinate those interested in beauty culture, gender, class, and the dynamics of race and social movements.

Cosmetic Surgery Narratives

A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Women's Accounts

Author: Debra Gimlin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137284781

Category: Social Science

Page: 197

View: 7971

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This book examines British and American women's narratives of cosmetic surgery, exploring what those narratives say about the contemporary status of cosmetic surgery and 'local' ideas about its legitimate and illegitimate uses.

The Struggle for Equal Adulthood

Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America

Author: Corinne T. Field

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 146961815X

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 7949

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In the fight for equality, early feminists often cited the infantilization of women and men of color as a method used to keep them out of power. Corinne T. Field argues that attaining adulthood--and the associated political rights, economic opportunities, and sexual power that come with it--became a common goal for both white and African American feminists between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The idea that black men and all women were more like children than adult white men proved difficult to overcome, however, and continued to serve as a foundation for racial and sexual inequality for generations. In detailing the connections between the struggle for equality and concepts of adulthood, Field provides an essential historical context for understanding the dilemmas black and white women still face in America today, from "glass ceilings" and debates over welfare dependency to a culture obsessed with youth and beauty. Drawn from a fascinating past, this book tells the history of how maturity, gender, and race collided, and how those affected came together to fight against injustice.

The Diet Cure

The 8-Step Program to Rebalance Your Body Chemistry and End Food Cravings, Weight Gain, and Mood Swings--Naturally

Author: Julia Ross

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101604042

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 464

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More than 100,000 copies later, this breakthrough program is more effective than ever— substantially revised and updated to include the author's latest clinical research. For the more than 160 million overweight Americans, dieting is a failure. Based on more than twenty years of proven clinical results, The Diet Cure's revolutionary approach curbs food cravings and restores the brain's mood and appetite chemistry in twenty-four hours. Beginning with her 8-Step Quick Symptom Questionnaire, celebrated nutritional psychotherapist Julia Ross helps readers identify their unique underlying biochemical imbalances and provides targeted strategies to correct those imbalances using nutritional supplements to jump-start the dietary overhaul. Readers then create their own safe, easy-to-follow plan to end low-calorie dieting and food obsessions for good. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Becoming Women

The Embodied Self in Image Culture

Author: Carla Rice

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442668261

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 5217

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In a culture where beauty is currency, women’s bodies are often perceived as measures of value and worth. The search for visibility and self-acceptance can be daunting, especially for those on the cultural margins of “beauty.” Becoming Women offers a thoughtful examination of the search for identity in an image-oriented world. That search is told through the experiences of a group of women who came of age in the wake of second and third wave feminism, featuring voices from marginalized and misrepresented groups. Carla Rice pairs popular imagery with personal narratives to expose the “culture of contradiction” where increases in individual body acceptance have been matched by even more restrictive feminine image ideals and norms. With insider insights from the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty, Rice exposes the beauty industry’s colonization of women’s bodies, and examines why “the beauty myth” has yet to be resolved.