The Living Mountain

Author: Nan Shepherd

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN: 0857863606

Category: Nature

Page: 108

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The Living Mountain is a lyrical testament in praise of the Cairngorms. It is a work deeply rooted in Nan Shepherd’s knowledge of the natural world, and a poetic and philosophical meditation on our longing for high and holy places. Drawing on different perspectives of the mountain environment, Shepherd makes the familiar strange and the strange awe-inspiring. Her sensitivity and powers of observation put her into the front rank of nature writing.

A Year in the Life of the Cairngorms

Author: Chris Townsend

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN: 9780711231467

Category: Cairngorms (Scotland)

Page: 112

View: 6780

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The Cairngorms contain the greatest area of land over 4,000 feet above sea level, the largest Caledonian pine forests and the biggest national park in Britain. This spectacular land of mountains, lochs, rivers and woods is wild and beautiful. The mountains form a series of vast sub-arctic plateaux ringed by big granite cliffs, deep lake-filled corries and long glens. High rocky passes cut through the mountains while pine and birch forests cover their lower slopes. For much of the year the mountains are snow-covered, a white wilderness that can be harsh and savage but also dramatic and awe-inspiring. For the photographer the severe weather and rugged terrain are challenging but also very rewarding. Photographer and author Chris Townsend has lived in the Cairngorms for 20 years and photographed them in all seasons, walking over the summits in summer, skiing over them in winter and camping out at all times of the year. The results are shown in this collection of evocative and impressive images.

It's a Fine Day for the Hill

Author: Adam Watson

Publisher: Paragon Publishing

ISBN: 1907611584

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 182

View: 7022

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Adam Watson's interest in snow began at 7, the Cairngorms at 9, mountaineering and ski-mountaineering in later boyhood. His book recounts many fine days on the hill in Scotland, Iceland and northern Scandinavia on foot or ski, often on his own in wonderful places that excited him beyond measure. He tells what it was like to be with four remarkable Scots who greatly influenced him as a young naturalist and mountaineer, Seton Gordon, Bob Scott o the Derry, Tom Weir and Tom Patey. The beauty and variety of the hill, the weather and the wildlife were and are an inspiration to him, and his descriptions touch on this. In these modern times of pervasive regulation and politically correct control, this book is a breath of fresh air as a proclamation of the value and wonder that are the greatest joys of lone exploration on the spur of the moment. Author Adam Watson, BSc, PhD, DSc, DUniv, raised in lowland Aberdeenshire, is a retired research ecologist aged 80. He began lifelong interests on winter snow in 1937, snow patches in 1938, the Cairngorms in 1939. A mountaineer and ski-mountaineer since boyhood, he has experienced Scotland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, mainland Canada, Newfoundland, Baffin Island, Finland, Switzerland, Italy, Vancouver Island and Alaska. His main research was and is on population biology, behaviour and habitat of northern birds and mammals. In retirement he has contributed 16 scientific publications on snow patches since 1994. He is a Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Royal Meteorological Society, Royal Society of Edinburgh, and Society of Biology. Since 1954 he has been a member of the Scottish Mountaineering Club and since 1968 author of the Club's District Guide to the Cairngorms. This book is testimony to the idea that Exploring for yourself by your own free will, without formal courses or training, is the best joy the hills can give (my Preface, The Cairngorms, 1975). Now I would add 'without detailed planning', for my best days have been lone trips begun without such planning, indeed on the spur of moment and weather, almost chance events. Four chapters salute Scots to whom I owed much as a young naturalist and mountaineer, Seton Gordon, Bob Scott, Tom Patey and Tom Weir. They held to the above idea. Reading Seton Gordon's Cairngorm Hills of Scotland in 1939 changed my life. I wanted to be in these hills at all seasons. Exploration by one's own free will is best pervaded by humility and wonder. Alien to this are avalanche alerts, 'challenge' walks, 'character-building', courses, Duke of Edinburgh Awards, guided walks, hill-runs, interpretive boards, marker cairns, outdoor centres, qualifications, rangers, route-cards, school outings, signposts, sponsored walks, tests of snowpack stability, text messages sent as avalanche alerts to mobile phones, transceivers, visitor centres, 'walk of the day', wardens, and 'wilderness walks'. Also alien are Munros, Corbetts and other anthropocentric designations, those who 'bag' them as if hills were shot birds, and assault, attack, battle, conquer, conquest, fight, vanquish and victory as if hills were enemies. Many with flashing camera, global positioning, map, compass, mobile phone, and survival equipment are unsafe, as rescue accounts often reveal. Even climbers have been rescued after neglecting navigation on easy ground after completing rock climbs or ice climbs. Those who behave as if alone on an icecap when nobody else knows where they are and no help is possible, have greater inherent safety. They are also more likely to understand and appreciate the hill and its weather, snow, wildlife and indigenous folk.

Repeat Photography

Methods and Applications in the Natural Sciences

Author: Robert H. Webb

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 9781610910064

Category: Science

Page: 392

View: 3051

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First developed in the 1880s as a way to monitor glaciers in Europe, repeat photography —the practice of taking photographs at different points in times from the same physical vantage point—remains an essential and cost-effective technique for scientists and researchers working to track and study landscape change. This volume explores the technical and geographic scope of this important technique, focusing particularly on the intertwined influences of climatic variation and land-use practices in sculpting landscapes. Contributors offer a broad-perspective review of the state-of-the-art of repeat photography, withtwenty-three chapters written by researchers around the globe who have made use of repeat photography in their work. Topics addressed include • the history of repeat photography • techniques for creating and analyzing repeat photographs • applications in the geosciences • applications in population ecology • applications in ecosystem change • cultural applications Repeat Photography demonstrates the wide range of potential applications, examines new techniques for acquiring data from repeat photography, and clearly shows that repeat photography remains a valuable and efficient means of monitoring change in both developed and developing regions. Overone hundredsets of photographs, includingthirty-twopages of color photos, serve as examples. Recent concerns about climate change and its effects on natural landscapes, combined with ongoing concerns about land-use practices, make this state-of-the-art review a timely contribution to the literature.

Place name discoveries on Upper Deeside and the far Highlands

Author: Ian Murray,Adam Watson

Publisher: Paragon Publishing

ISBN: 1782223274

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 3206

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In this book the authors present many unpublished place names from Upper Deeside and from counties in the Highlands beyond. These were heard from indigenous folk back to 1941. Names are given with phonetic spellings, so that readers can pronounce them accurately, and in most cases with translations from Gaelic, Norse, Scots or Pictish into English. The book is richly illustrated with photographs of places and informants. Of interest to residents and visitors, it should help preserve for the future an important aspect of local identity and language.

In the Cairngorms

Author: Nan Shepherd

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781903385333

Category:

Page: 62

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First published in 1934, In The Cairngorms is Nan Shepherd's only book of poems. It took her twenty-five years to write these forty-six poems. Each is possessed of a fierce intensity; together, they offer glimpses into what she once called 'the burning heart of life'. Shepherd's lifelong acquaintance with the Scottish mountains was a spiritual as well as a geographical exploration: in the Cairngorms she discovered both elemental beauty and profound metaphysical mystery. Her huge gifts as a poet were to convey these discoveries in language that remains strange and thrilling.

Walking in the Cairngorms

Author: Ronald Turnbull

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN: 1783625260

Category: Travel

Page: 320

View: 2929

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This guidebook contains over 100 routes for walking in the Scottish Cairngorms. It includes 18 Munro summits and smaller viewpoint hills. Walks range in length from 1 to 26 miles and are graded for difficulty. For the adventurous there are the best of the area's rocky scrambles, and the classic through-routes including the Lairig Ghru. For those looking for a more gentle alternative, there are easy, sandy trails wandering among the tall pines and along the banks of the great rivers Spey, Nethy and Dee. Britain's biggest mountain range is home to exceptional and varied scenery - from the ancient Caledonian forest to the granite plateau and the glacial glens and high corries where green lochans lie below great crags of the plateau rim. Along with the main Cairngorm range between Speyside and Deeside, the guidebook covers Lochnagar. It includes practical information on snack stops, public transport and accommodation, as well as a route summary table and scrambles summary.

Vehicle Hill Tracks in Northern Scotland

Author: Adam Watson

Publisher: Paragon Publishing

ISBN: 1908341076

Category: Mountain roads

Page: 152

View: 3359

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This book is the most comprehensive account on the spread of vehicle tracks on hill land in northern Scotland that has occurred since the mid 1950s. It reviews timing, numbers, locations, distribution and impacts including run-off, soils and vegetation. Then it provides an impartial analysis of the generally low standards of construction and reinstatement, with recommendations to minimise impacts and maximise reinstatement. Included is a brief history of public concern about tracks. This culminated in a petition and debate in the Scottish Parliament and a decision by the Government Minister to hold a consultative review of planning procedures relevant to the control of tracks. The current book constitutes a sound factual baseline and store of technical information, richly illustrated with 58 colour photographs. This will benefit all, including the government, planning officers, landowners and the public who appreciate and value the Scottish countryside and wish to leave this priceless heritage in good heart for the benefit of future generations. Unfortunately a recent 'good practice guide' published by Scottish Natural Heritage is inadequate.

Scotland

Author: Chris Townsend

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN: 1849653534

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 560

View: 8728

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This book is a resource covering the finest walks, treks and climbs to be found in Scotland, written by an award-winning author. From the rolling hills of the Southern Uplands to the great granite plateaus of the Cairngorms to the jagged peaks of Torridon and the Cuillin hills on the Isle of Skye, Scotland has a rich variety of wild landscapes and terrain that is perfect for many activities. Scotland's lochs, forests and rivers offer spectacular scenery and a tranquility that visitors embrace time and time again. Author Chris Townsend was the first person to complete a continuous round of all the Scottish Munros and Tops. He has also walked across the Scottish mountains from coast to coast 14 times, and has served as the President of the Mountaineering Council of Scotland. With superb photography and an exceptional level of detail throughout, this book is an ideal all-embracing guide for the mountain adventurer.

The Central Highlands Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland (includes Loch Lomond, The Cairngorms, the Trossachs, The Malt Whisky Trail and the Speyside Way)

Author: Donald Reid,Rob Humphreys

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1409365727

Category: Travel

Page: 88

View: 7303

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The Rough Guide Snapshot The Central Highlands is the ultimate travel guide to this dramatic part of Scotland. It guides you through the region with reliable information and comprehensive coverage of all the sights and attractions, from Speyside to Royal Deeside and Loch Lomond to the Cairngorms. Detailed maps and up-to-date listings pinpoint the best cafés, restaurants, hotels, shops, pubs and bars, ensuring you have the best trip possible, whether passing through, staying for the weekend or longer. Also included is the Basics section from the Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands and Islands, with all the practical information you need for travelling in and around this beautiful region of Scotland, including transport, food, drink, costs, health, festivals and outdoor activities. Also published as part of the Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands and Islands. Full coverage: Loch Lomond, the West Highland Way, the Trossachs, Dunkeld, Aberfeldy, Loch Tay, Pitlochry, Rannoch Moor, the Angus glens, Deeside, Balmoral, Braemar, the Don Valley, Strathspey, Aviemore, the Cairngorms and Speyside. (Equivalent printed page extent 88 pages).

There's Always the Hills

Author: Careron McNeish

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781910985953

Category: Authors, Scottish

Page: 320

View: 1682

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From his home in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland, Cameron McNeish reflects on a life dedicated to the outdoors. Following his career as an international long jump athlete, he has for forty years written and talked about walking and climbing in Scotland, meeting some of the sport's great characters. A prolific author, he has led treks in the Himalayas and Syria, edited The Great Outdoors Magazine, created new long-distance routes and made television series, campaigned for Scottish independence and raised a family with his wife, Gina. Now he candidly recalls the ups and downs of a full life, much of it in the public eye, much of it until now unseen.

The Nature of the Cairngorms

Diversity in a Changing Environment

Author: Philip Shaw,Des B.A. Thompson

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN: 0114973261

Category: Science

Page: 444

View: 4075

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The Cairngorms area is arguably the most significant for nature conservation in the British Isles and contains its largest National Park. In this book, 35 authors, drawing on published and unpublished sources, present an up-to-date review of the area's natural features, including plants, animals, habitats, geology and landforms. The review falls into three parts. The first and largest part describes the area's rich diversity of nature, with each chapter summarising recent research findings, trends and conservation issues for a different landform, habitat or species group. The second part considers deer management, recreation and projected climate change impacts. Part three focuses on rare and threatened species, and identifies areas and habitats rich in species for which the Cairngorms are nationally and internationally important.

A Snow Book, Northern Scotland

Author: Adam Watson

Publisher: Paragon Publishing

ISBN: 1908341122

Category: Nature

Page: 138

View: 4561

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This book documents long-term studies of snow on high land in the Cairmgorms, including fresh snow lying in summer, the extent of snow on Ben Macdui plateau at the start of June, and dates of the first fresh lying snowfalls at the sites of the main snow-beds. It reviews data on the survival of snow patches through to the following winter, and recounts a decline of snow patches in recent decades. The author describes observations on rock lichens in relation to snow-lie, and lists vantage points on public roads with good views of places with snow patches on alpine land. He describes skiing in and near Aberdeen in the snowy winters of the early 1950s, and an exceptional snowfall in the Cairngorms at the start of September 1976. The author presents some descriptions and photographs of how birds and mammals use snow for shelter and sleeping. It has long been well known that red grouse, ptarmigan and mountain hares use snow hollows, but here the author illustrates how a fox used a snow hole, and how an otter made a snow slide. He presents photographs of snow pillars, snow holes made by human parties practising in winter, and avalanches. Next he draws attention to the observation that the extent and species of lichen and moss on cliffs, boulders and soil signify the extent of snow-lie. These plants are absent on sites where snow lies very late, or where frequent avalanches plunging down the cliff or water flowing down it prevent plants from growing. Where prolonged snow-lie occurs at the foot of cliffs or on cliff-tops, a band of pale, greenish-yellow rock lichens that thrive in snowy conditions is conspicuous, and in sunshine easily visible to the naked eye at over a mile distance. Lastly he presents some photographs that show snow mould growing on hill vegetation in Iceland and Scotland. Keywords Snow, climate, weather, physical geography, science, birds, mammals Author Adam Watson, BSc, PhD, DSc, DUniv, raised in lowland Aberdeenshire, is a retired research ecologist aged 81. He began lifelong interests on winter snow in 1937, snow patches in 1938, the Cairngorms in 1939. A mountaineer and ski-mountaineer since boyhood, he has experienced Scotland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, mainland Canada, Newfoundland, Baffin Island, Finland, Switzerland, Italy, Vancouver Island and Alaska. His main research was and is on population biology, behaviour and habitat of northern birds and mammals. In retirement he has contributed 16 scientific publications on snow patches since 1994. He is a Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Royal Meteorological Society, Royal Society of Edinburgh, and Society of Biology, and an Emeritus Member of the Ecological Society of America. Since 1954 he has been a member of the Scottish Mountaineering Club and since 1968 author of the Club's District Guide to the Cairngorms.

Scottish Hill and Mountain Names

The Origin and Meaning of the Names of Scotland's Hills and Mountains

Author: Peter Drummond,Donald William Stewart

Publisher: Scottish Mountaineering Club

ISBN: N.A

Category: Mountains

Page: 214

View: 3918

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Seton Gordon

The Life and Times of a Highland Gentleman

Author: Raymond Eagle

Publisher: Neil Wilson Publishing

ISBN: 1906000808

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 315

View: 707

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Seton Gordon was born in 1886 into an Aberdeenshire family and was to live to the age of 91. In that time his life spanned some of the most momentous changes in civilisation and yet his travels rarely took him away from Scotland for long. He dedicated his life to natural history and in his awareness of the environment he was ahead of his time.He wore the kilt as everyday dress and entered college in 1908 to take a degree in natural sciences at Exeter College, Oxford. Whilst there he befriended the Prince of Wales, who was to correspond with him after he left university. In later life he also corresponded with Ramsay MacDonald.He spent hours roaming the hills of Deeside and the Cairgorm plateau while observing nature and would sustain incredible hardships in pursuit of his favourite bird, the golden eagle. He became engaged to Audrey Pease in 1915 and after marriage, they moved to the Isle of Skye where they settled in Trotternish and where he began to write on all aspects of Highland and Hebridean life. Over the years he produced prose which managed to place man in his proper context in the environment, and these books inspired countless numbers to look to the hills and corries in search of Scotland's wilderness areas.His ethereal descriptions of the Western Isles, whether in sun or in rain, a but the real contribution of are perhaps his most finely observed pieces but the real contribution of his 28 books and numerous articles and papers was to the sum of knowledge on the natural history of the Highlands and Islands. He will be remembered by all who knew him, read him and heard him speak as one of the last great Highland gentlemen.Raymond Eagle first met Seton Gordon in Skye in 1949 and was to correspond with him for a number of years. After Eagle moved to Vancouver in 1967, a chance encounter led him to meet Seton's son, Alasdair who had lived in the city for several years. With Alasdair's help, Eagle set out to write this biography which was published in print format in 1990. This is a complete revised Ebook edition with numerous colour and black and white illustrations.