The Geological History of the British Isles

Author: Arlëne Hunter,Glynda Easterbrook

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780749201388

Category: Geology

Page: 143

View: 461

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Essential reading for first- and second-year Geology undergraduates, A-Level Geology teachers and students and enthusiastic amateur geologists. The book includes a comprehensive glossary, maps and excellent full-colour illustrations, and is based on part of a second-level Open University short course of the same name. The landscape and surface environment of the continental crust that now forms the islands of Great Britain, Ireland and the adjacent lesser isles has undergone dramatic changes during the geological history of the Earth. This book takes the reader on a geological tour of the British Isles, showing how changes in climate, sea-level and relief can be recognized and understood in the geological record. The reader is asked to use a variety of data and geological principles to interpret how and why different rocks formed, and to identify past environments and tectonic settings. By unravelling the geological history of the British Isles, a remarkable insight is gained into the geological evolution of the whole Earth.

The Geological Evolution of the British Isles

Author: T. R. Owen

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 1483285391

Category: Science

Page: 170

View: 5657

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Outlines the geological history and evolution of the British Isles and its surrounding sea areas. New information concerning Britain's evolution has emerged from the recent exploration of the seas around Britain in the search for oil and gas and much of this new information has been incorporated. The book will serve university and college students, sixth-form pupils in geology and will also be valuable to students in the allied disciplines such as geography, oceanography, and civil engineering

Geological History of Britain and Ireland

Author: Nigel H. Woodcock,R. A. Strachan

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118274059

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 2803

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Britain and Ireland have a remarkably varied geology for so small a fragment of continental crust, with a fine rock record back through three billion years of geological time. This history would have been interesting enough if it had been played out on relatively stable continental crust. However, Britain and Ireland have developed at a tectonic crossroads, on crust once traversed by subduction zones and volcanic arcs, continental rifts and mountain belts. The resulting complexity is instructive, fascinating and perplexing. Geological History of Britain and Ireland tells the region's story at a level accessible to undergraduate geologists, as well as to postgraduates, professionals or informed amateurs. This second edition is fully revised and updated, reflecting our continually developing knowledge of the region's geology. Full coverage is again given to the rich Precambrian and Early Palaeozoic history, as well as to later events more relevant to hydrocarbon exploration. The book is an essential starting point for more detailed studies of the regional geology. Additional resources for this book can be found at: http://www.wiley.com/go/woodcock/geologicalhistory

Geological Landscapes of Britain

Author: Julian Ashbourn

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789048188611

Category: Science

Page: 271

View: 1179

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This book discusses the geological history of Britain from the early geological formation of the British Isles, through to the variety of currently visible rock formations and ensuing natural landscapes. It is presented as an accessible narrative which may be utilised in a variety of educational contexts, or simply enjoyed as an holistic overview of the subject. It additionally provides an important visual record of British geology in the 21st century via a portfolio of high quality, scientifically accurate photographs, which are themselves part of a larger collection, being developed to become the definitive image library for British geoscience. In addition, the book provides an insight into the relationship between the geology of Britain and how early settlers interacted with the landscape throughout Mesolithic and Neolithic times. It is a book which serves equally as a scientific reference, an introduction to the subject of British geology and, no doubt, as an edition which will remain a pleasure to own in its own right.

The GEOLOGY OF BRITAIN

An Introduction

Author: Peter Toghill

Publisher: Crowood

ISBN: 1847973612

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 4062

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This book is a geological history of Britain from over 2,000 million years ago to the present day and describes the enormous variety of rocks, minerals and fossils that form this fascinating island. An introductory chapter covers the fundamental principles of geology. Further chapters describe the rocks, minerals and fossils of the recognised periods of geological time, and the areas where they are found today. This book is written for the lay person interested in the great variety of Britain's rocks and landscapes but also includes a wealth of information for students at all levels.

Stratigraphy of the British Isles

Author: Dorothy H. Rayner

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521299619

Category: Science

Page: 460

View: 3712

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This is a reprint of the second edition of Dr Rayner's standard text on the stratigraphy and historical geology of the British Isles. The book is written for undergraduates and other readers who may have only a general acquaintance with the broad principles of geology. An introductory chapter reviews the basic principles of stratigraphy, geochronology and tectonics. The various geological systems found in the British Isles are then considered in turn. A valuable feature of the book is the extensive treatment of different regional areas within the discussion of a particular geological system. In the final chapter the author reviews briefly those major economic resources that are related to stratigraphy. Throughout the text care has been taken to introduce the plate tectonic interpretation of stratigraphic features. Much more is known about the neighbouring continental shelf and the geology of sea floors and this also is included in order to provide a comprehensive integrated account of the geological history of the British Isles.

A Revised Correlation of Carboniferous Rocks in the British Isles

Author: C. N. Waters

Publisher: Geological Society of London

ISBN: 9781862393332

Category: Science

Page: 186

View: 1345

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This report revises and expands upon the 1976 and 1978 publications for the Dinantian and Silesian, respectively, combining them into a single account of British and Irish Carboniferous stratigraphy. The need to update the two Special Reports reflects the considerable advances in Carboniferous geology over the last 30 years. The report covers developments in international chronostratigraphy and incorporates wholesale reassessments of British lithostratigraphy. A huge volume of biostratigraphical information has been published over recent decades and the report summarizes the key information. Carboniferous rocks have long been of economic importance, but it is the search for hydrocarbons, in its infancy at the time of the previous reports, which has greatly increased our understanding of Carboniferous successions offshore and at depth, particularly in southern and eastern England.This Special Report will be a valuable reference for research and applied geoscientists working on rocks of Carboniferous age in the UK, Ireland and offshore areas.

The Lie of the Land

An under-the-field guide to the British Isles

Author: Ian Vince

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330535889

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3365

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Like most of us, Ian Vince used to think of the British countryside as average, unexciting - as dramatic as a nice cup of tea. Then, over the course of a single car journey, the features of our green and pleasant land reawakened a fascination with geology that he had long forgotten, and he began to delve beneath the surface (metaphorically, that is). From the rocks of north-west Scotland which are amongst the oldest on the planet to St Michael's Mount off the coast of Cornwall, which was still being shaped in human memory, The Lie of the Land takes us on a journey through a fantastically exotic Britain of red desert sands, shattering continental collisions and tides of volcanic lava. Ian Vince shows us how Britain came to look the way it does; and with warmth and wit transports us back through billions of years to a land that time forgot.

GeoBritannica

Geological landscapes and the British peoples

Author: Mike Leeder,Joy Lawlor

Publisher: Dunedin Academic Press

ISBN: 178046567X

Category: Science

Page: 296

View: 9819

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GeoBritannica concerns the geological legacy of Britain, an inheritance bequeathed by its bedrock to the peoples who have lived on the island for the eleven millennia since the Ice Ages. The authors explain the geological foundations of the landscape and the raw materials it provides. They show how this geology has been made use of by society and by individuals in creative acts of the imagination. The reader will discover how regional environments and interests have been tackled by geologists in endeavours as diverse as mining, quarrying, architecture, literature and the visual arts.This is a book which puts a modern interpretation of the geological history of Britain into its historic, social and artistic contexts. Why is geology so fascinating to us? How do geologists do their science? Why are the differing landscapes what, where and how they are? What is the nature of the geological foundations of the British landscapes? How have geological discoveries developed our understanding of the landscape of Britain over the past two hundred years? What is the geological context of the raw materials used in past and present industries and for historic and vernacular buildings? How have geological landscapes and materials influenced past and present architects, visual artists and writers?This is a book for those wanting to develop a better understanding of where we live and how we develop our love and understanding of the island which we inhabit.

The Hidden Landscape

A Journey into the Geological Past

Author: Richard Fortey

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409087697

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 8980

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'A very well written book about geology and geological history' Sir David Attenborough, The Times 'I travelled to Haverfordwest to get to the past. From Paddington Station a Great Western locomotive took me on a journey westwards from London further and further back into geological time, from the age of mammals to the age of trilobites...' So begins this enthralling exploration of time and place in which Richard Fortey peels away the top layer of the land to reveal the hidden landscape - the rocks which contain the story of distant events, which dictate not only the personality of the landscape, but the nature of the soil, the plants that grow in it and the regional characteristics of the buildings. We travel with him as our guide throughout the British Isles and as the rocks change so we learn to read the clues they contain: that Britain was once divided into two parts separated by an ocean, that Scottish malt whisky, Harris tweed, slate roofs and thatched cottages can be traced back to tumultuous events which took place many millions of years ago. The Hidden Landscape has become a classic in popular geology since its first publication in 1993. This new edition is fully updated and beautifully illustrated.

Cols and Passes of the British Isles

Author: Graham Robb

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 184614874X

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 8650

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A col is the lowest point on the saddle between two mountains. Graham Robb has spent years uncovering and cataloguing the 2,002 cols and 105 passes scattered across the British Isles. Some of these obscure and magical sites are virgin cols that have never been crossed. Dozens were lost by the Ordnance Survey and are recorded only in ballads or monastic charters. The eleven cols of Hadrian's Wall are practically unknown and have never been properly identified. These underappreciated slices of natural beauty provide a new way of looking at British history, and a challenge for cyclists and walkers.

Mountains

The origins of the Earth's mountain systems

Author: Graham Park

Publisher: Dunedin Academic Press

ISBN: 1780465793

Category: Nature

Page: 528

View: 3032

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Most mountains on Earth occur within relatively well-defined, narrow belts separated by wide expanses of much lower-lying ground. Their distribution is not random but is caused by the now well-understood geological processes of plate tectonics. Some mountains mark the site of a former plate collision – where one continental plate has ridden up over another, resulting in a zone of highly deformed and elevated rocks. Others are essentially volcanic in origin. The most obvious mountain belts today – the Himalayas, the Alps and the Andes, for example - are situated at currently active plate boundaries. Others, such as the Caledonian mountains of the British Isles and Scandinavia, are the product of a plate collision that happened far in the geological past and have no present relationship to a plate boundary. These are much lower, with a generally gentler relief, worn down through millennia of erosion. The presently active mountain belts are arranged in three separate systems: the Alpine-Himalayan ranges, the circum-Pacific belt and the mid-ocean ridges. Much of the Alpine-Himalayan belt is relatively well known, but large parts of the circum-Pacific and ocean-ridge systems are not nearly as familiar, but contain equally impressive mountain ranges despite large parts being partly or wholly submerged. This book takes the reader along the active mountain systems explaining how plate tectonic processes have shaped them, then looks more briefly at some of the older mountain systems whose tectonic origins are more obscure. It is aimed at those with an interest in mountains and in developing an understanding of the geological processes that create them. The author, Graham Park is Emeritus Professor of Tectonic Geology at the University of Keele and the author of the best-selling books 'Introducing Geology' and 'The Making of Europe: A geological history' among others by him also published by Dunedin Academic Press.

A revised correlation of Tertiary rocks in the British Isles and adjacent areas of NW Europe

Author: C. King

Publisher: Geological Society of London

ISBN: 1862397287

Category: Science

Page: 724

View: 557

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This Special Report comprehensively describes the stratigraphy and correlation of the Tertiary (Paleogene–Neogene) rocks of NW Europe and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean and is the summation of fifty years of research on Tertiary sediments by Chris King. His book is essential reading for all geologists who deal with Tertiary rocks across NW Europe, including those in the petroleum industry and geotechnical services as well as academic stratigraphers and palaeontologists. Introductory sections on chronostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and other methods of dating and correlation are followed by a regional summary of Tertiary sedimentary basins and their framework and an introduction to Tertiary igneous rocks. The third and largest segment comprises the regional stratigraphic summaries. Regions covered are the North Sea Basin, onshore areas of southern England and the eastern English Channel area, the North Atlantic margins (including non-marine basins in the Irish Sea and elsewhere) and the Paleogene igneous rocks of Scotland.

Geological History of Britain and Ireland

Author: Nigel H. Woodcock,R. A. Strachan

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118274059

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 2612

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Britain and Ireland have a remarkably varied geology for so small a fragment of continental crust, with a fine rock record back through three billion years of geological time. This history would have been interesting enough if it had been played out on relatively stable continental crust. However, Britain and Ireland have developed at a tectonic crossroads, on crust once traversed by subduction zones and volcanic arcs, continental rifts and mountain belts. The resulting complexity is instructive, fascinating and perplexing. Geological History of Britain and Ireland tells the region's story at a level accessible to undergraduate geologists, as well as to postgraduates, professionals or informed amateurs. This second edition is fully revised and updated, reflecting our continually developing knowledge of the region's geology. Full coverage is again given to the rich Precambrian and Early Palaeozoic history, as well as to later events more relevant to hydrocarbon exploration. The book is an essential starting point for more detailed studies of the regional geology. Additional resources for this book can be found at: http://www.wiley.com/go/woodcock/geologicalhistory

The Highlands Controversy

Constructing Geological Knowledge Through Fieldwork in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: David R. Oldroyd

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226626352

Category: Science

Page: 438

View: 6430

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The Highlands Controversy is a rich and perceptive account of the third and last major dispute in nineteenth-century geology stemming from the work of Sir Roderick Murchison. The earlier Devonian and Cambrian-Silurian controversies centered on whether the strata of Devon and Wales should be classified by lithological or paleontological criteria, but the Highlands dispute arose from the difficulties the Scottish Highlands presented to geologists who were just learning to decipher the very complex processes of mountain building and metamorphism. David Oldroyd follows this controversy into the last years of the nineteenth century, as geology was transformed by increasing professionalization and by the development of new field and laboratory techniques. In telling this story, Oldroyd's aim is to analyze how scientific knowledge is constructed within a competitive scientific community—how theory, empirical findings, and social factors interact in the formation of knowledge. Oldroyd uses archival material and his own extensive reconstruction of the nineteenth-century fieldwork in a case study showing how detailed maps and sections made it possible to understand the exceptionally complex geological structure of the Highlands An invaluable addition to the history of geology, The Highlands Controversy also makes important contributions to our understanding of the social and conceptual processes of scientific work, especially in times of heated dispute.

A History of the Peoples of the British Isles

From 1688 to 1914

Author: Thomas Heyck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134415206

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 4987

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The three volumes weave together the histories of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales and their peoples. Volume II includes the formation of the nation-state, the industrialization of the British economy and the emergence of Victorian society.

The History of the Study of Landforms - Volume 3 (Routledge Revivals)

Historical and Regional Geomorphology, 1890-1950

Author: Robert P. Beckinsale,Richard J. Chorley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113493517X

Category: Science

Page: 528

View: 9795

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This volume provides a global treatment of historical and regional geomorphic work as it developed from the end of the nineteenth century to the hiatus of the Second World War. The book deals with the burgeoning of the eustatic theory, the concepts of isostasy and epeirogeny, and the first complete statements of the cycle of erosion and of polycyclic denudation chronology.

The Making Of The British Landscape

From the Ice Age to the Present

Author: Nicholas Crane

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0297857355

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 7195

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How much do we really know about the place we call 'home'? In this sweeping, timely book, Nicholas Crane tells the story of Britain. The British landscape has been continuously occupied by humans for 12,000 years, from the end of the Ice Age to the twenty-first century. It has been transformed from a European peninsula of glacier and tundra to an island of glittering cities and exquisite countryside. In this geographical journey through time, we discover the ancient relationship between people and place and the deep-rooted tensions between town and countryside. The twin drivers of landscape change - climate and population - have arguably wielded as much influence on our habitat as monarchs and politics. From tsunamis and farming to Roman debacles and industrial cataclysms, from henge to high-rise and hamlet to metropolis, this is a book about change and adaptation. AS Britain lurches from an exploitative past towards a more sustainable future, this is the story of our age.