The Marches

A Borderland Journey Between England and Scotland

Author: Rory Stewart

Publisher: Mariner Books

ISBN: 9781328745651

Category:

Page: 352

View: 3624

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From a member of Parliament and best-selling author of The Places in Between, an exploration of the Marches--the borderland between England and Scotland--and the political turmoil and vivid lives that created it

The Marches

Author: Rory Stewart

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780099581895

Category:

Page: 368

View: 5553

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LONGLISTED FOR THE ORWELL PRIZE 2017 'This is travel writing at its best.' Katherine Norbury, Observer An Observer Book of the Year His father Brian taught Rory Stewart how to walk, and walked with him on journeys from Iran to Malaysia. Now they have chosen to do their final walk together along 'the Marches' - the frontier that divides their two countries, Scotland and England. Brian, a ninety-year-old former colonial official and intelligence officer, arrives in Newcastle from Scotland dressed in tartan and carrying a draft of his new book You Know More Chinese Than You Think. Rory comes from his home in the Lake District, carrying a Punjabi fighting stick which he used when walking across Afghanistan. On their six-hundred-mile, thirty-day journey - with Rory on foot, and his father 'ambushing' him by car - the pair relive Scottish dances, reflect on Burmese honey-bears, and on the loss of human presence in the British landscape. On mountain ridges and in housing estates they uncover a forgotten country crushed between England and Scotland: the Middleland. They cross upland valleys which once held forgotten peoples and languages - still preserved in sixth-century lullabies and sixteenth-century ballads. The surreal tragedy of Hadrian's Wall forces them to re-evaluate their own experiences in the Iraq and Vietnam wars. The wild places of the uplands reveal abandoned monasteries, border castles, secret military test sites and newly created wetlands. They discover unsettling modern lives, lodged in an ancient land. Their odyssey develops into a history of nationhood, an anatomy of the landscape, a chronicle of contemporary Britain and an exuberant encounter between a father and a son. And as the journey deepens, and the end approaches, Brian and Rory fight to match, step by step, modern voices, nationalisms and contemporary settlements to the natural beauty of the Marches, and a fierce absorption in tradition in their own unconventional lives.

The Marches

A Borderland Journey Between England and Scotland

Author: Rory Stewart

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

ISBN: 9780544108882

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6955

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From the New York Times-bestselling author of The Places in Between, an exploration of the landscape of his home on the borderland between England and Scotland - known as the Marches -- and the history, people, and conflicts that shape it

The Places In Between

Author: Rory Stewart

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330508342

Category: Travel

Page: N.A

View: 9057

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Rory Stewart's moving account of his walk across Afghanistan in January 2002 was immediately hailed as a classic. Caught between hostile nations, warring factions and competing ideologies, at the time Afghanistan was in turmoil following the US invasion. Travelling entirely on foot and following the inaccessible mountainous route once taken by the Mogul Emperor, Babur the Great, Stewart was nearly defeated by the extreme, hostile conditions. Only with the help of an unexpected companion and the generosity of the people he met on the way did he survive to report back with unique insight on a region closed to the world by twenty-four years of war. Winner of the Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Award and the Spirit of Scotland Award and shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award, the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize and the Scottish Book of the Year Prize.

The Prince of the Marshes

And Other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq

Author: Rory Stewart

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 9780156033008

Category: Travel

Page: 416

View: 8314

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An adventurous diplomat’s “engrossing and often darkly humorous” memoir of working with Iraqis after the fall of Saddam Hussein(Publishers Weekly). In August 2003, at the age of thirty, Rory Stewart took a taxi from Jordan to Baghdad. A Farsi-speaking British diplomat who had recently completed an epic walk from Turkey to Bangladesh, he was soon appointed deputy governor of Amarah and then Nasiriyah, provinces in the remote, impoverished marsh regions of southern Iraq. He spent the next eleven months negotiating hostage releases, holding elections, and splicing together some semblance of an infrastructure for a population of millions teetering on the brink of civil war. The Prince of the Marshes tells the story of Stewart’s year. As a participant he takes us inside the occupation and beyond the Green Zone, introducing us to a colorful cast of Iraqis and revealing the complexity and fragility of a society we struggle to understand. By turns funny and harrowing, moving and incisive, it amounts to a unique portrait of heroism and the tragedy that intervention inevitably courts in the modern age.

The Debatable Land

The Lost World Between Scotland and England

Author: Graham Robb

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1760558680

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 2046

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The Debatable Land was an independent territory which used to exist between Scotland and England. It is the oldest detectable territorial division in Great Britain. At the height of its notoriety, it was the bloodiest region in the country, and preoccupied the monarchs and parliaments of England, Scotland and France. After most of its population was slaughtered or deported, it became the last part of Great Britain to be conquered and brought under the control of a state. Today, it has vanished from the map and no one knows exactly where and what it was. When Graham Robb moved to a lonely house on the very edge of England, he discovered that the river which almost surrounded his new home had once marked the Debatable Land’s southern boundary. Under the powerful spell of curiosity, Robb began a journey – on foot, by bicycle and into the past – that would uncover lost towns and roads, shed new light on the Dark Age, reveal the truth about this maligned patch of land, and lead to more than one discovery of major historical significance. For the first time – and with all of his customary charm, wit and literary grace – Graham Robb, prize-winning author of The Discovery of France, has written about his native country. The Debatable Land is an epic and energetic book that takes us from 2016 back to an age when neither England nor Scotland could be imagined to reveal a crucial, missing piece in the puzzle of British history.

Occupational Hazards

Author: Stephen Brown,Rory Stewart

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN: 1786821737

Category: Drama

Page: 112

View: 9289

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‘It’s democracy. Everyone is equally unhappy. It’s the defining feature of the system’ September 2003. Rory Stewart, a thirty year old former British diplomat, is posted to serve as governor in a province of the newly liberated Iraq. His job is to help build a society at peace with itself and its neighbours – an ambitious mission, admittedly, but outperforming Saddam should surely not prove too difficult... Stephen Brown’s new play, based on Rory Stewart’s critically acclaimed memoir Occupational Hazards, tells an extraordinary story about the moral conflicts, the dangers and the comic absurdities inherent in any foreign occupation.

A Famine of Horses

A Sir Robert Carey Mystery

Author: P F Chisholm

Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press Inc

ISBN: 1615954058

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 7505

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In the year 1592, Sir Robert Carey, a handsome courtier, comes north to Carlisle to take up his new post as Deputy Warden of the West March. He has wangled his appointment to be nearer his true love, a married woman, and farther from the gimlet eyes of his creditors and the disapproving eye of his father (the Queen’s cousin—possibly her half-brother). And of course, he can use the money.... Sir Robert is quick to realize he won’t see a profit from the perks if he fails to keep the peace. Alas, he is quickly challenged by the murder of a local lad, the possible betrayal of a disappointed rival, the ire of the lady’s husband, and the question of the horses—the hundreds of horses being stolen from all over the neighborhood. It’s hard to say whether the greater danger lies without the city walls amidst the scheming Scots—or within, amidst the unruly English garrison. Rich in atmosphere and packed with vivid real and fictional characters, few novels are as well imagined or as much fun as this romp through roguish courtiers, rival gangs, rustling, treason, and high ambition.

How the Scots Invented the Modern World

The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World and Ever ything in It

Author: Arthur Herman

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307420954

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 7429

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An exciting account of the origins of the modern world Who formed the first literate society? Who invented our modern ideas of democracy and free market capitalism? The Scots. As historian and author Arthur Herman reveals, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Scotland made crucial contributions to science, philosophy, literature, education, medicine, commerce, and politics—contributions that have formed and nurtured the modern West ever since. Herman has charted a fascinating journey across the centuries of Scottish history. Here is the untold story of how John Knox and the Church of Scotland laid the foundation for our modern idea of democracy; how the Scottish Enlightenment helped to inspire both the American Revolution and the U.S. Constitution; and how thousands of Scottish immigrants left their homes to create the American frontier, the Australian outback, and the British Empire in India and Hong Kong. How the Scots Invented the Modern World reveals how Scottish genius for creating the basic ideas and institutions of modern life stamped the lives of a series of remarkable historical figures, from James Watt and Adam Smith to Andrew Carnegie and Arthur Conan Doyle, and how Scottish heroes continue to inspire our contemporary culture, from William “Braveheart” Wallace to James Bond. And no one who takes this incredible historical trek will ever view the Scots—or the modern West—in the same way again.

Can Intervention Work? (Norton Global Ethics Series)

Author: Rory Stewart,Gerald Knaus

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393082156

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 7168

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Best-selling author Rory Stewart and political economist Gerald Knaus examine the impact of large-scale interventions, from Bosnia to Afghanistan. “A fresh and critically important perspective on foreign interventions” (Washington Post), Can Intervention Work? distills Rory Stewart’s (author of The Places In Between) and Gerald Knaus’s remarkable firsthand experiences of political and military interventions into a potent examination of what we can and cannot achieve in a new era of nation building. As they delve into the massive, military-driven efforts in Bosnia, Iraq, and Afghanistan, the authors reveal each effort’s enormous consequences for international relations, human rights, and our understanding of state building. Stewart and Knaus parse carefully the philosophies that have informed interventionism—from neoconservative to liberal imperialist—and draw on their diverse experiences in the military, nongovernmental organizations, and the Iraqi provincial government to reveal what we can ultimately expect from large-scale interventions and how they might best realize positive change in the world. Author and columnist Fred Kaplan calls Can Intervention Work? “the most thorough examination of the subject [of intervention] that I’ve read in a while.”

Sixty Degrees North

Around the World in Search of Home

Author: Malachy Tallack

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781681774619

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 1019

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From the northern wilds of Greenland andScotlandto the far away reaches ofScandinavia and Siberia, a moving meditation on the allure of travel and the meaning of home."

The Plot

A Biography of an English Acre

Author: Madeleine Bunting

Publisher: Granta Books

ISBN: 1847081444

Category: Fathers and daughters

Page: 304

View: 3039

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Madeleine Bunting's multidimensional chronicle is among the very best pieces of non-fiction to have been published in a long while about what it is like to be English' - Simon Schama, Financial Times

Border

A Journey to the Edge of Europe

Author: Kapka Kassabova

Publisher: Granta Books

ISBN: 1783783192

Category: Travel

Page: N.A

View: 1524

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Winner of the the British Academy Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanding 2018 Winner of the Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year 2017 Winner of the 2017 Highland Book Prize Winner of the Saltire Society Book of the Year 2017 Shortlisted for the RSL Ondaatje Prize 2018 Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford Prize 2017 Shortlisted for the Duff Cooper Prize 2017 Shortlisted for the Bread and Roses Award 2018 Shortlisted for the Gordon Burn Prize 2017 Shortlisted for the National Circle of Critics Award 2017 When Kapka Kassabova was a child, the borderzone between Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece was rumoured to be an easier crossing point into the West than the Berlin Wall so it swarmed with soldiers, spies and fugitives. On holidays close to the border on the Black Sea coast, she remembers playing on the beach, only miles from where an electrified fence bristled, its barbs pointing inwards toward the enemy: the holiday-makers, the potential escapees. Today, this densely forested landscape is no longer heavily militarised, but it is scarred by its past. In Border, Kapka Kassabova sets out on a journey to meet the people of this triple border - Bulgarians, Turks, Greeks, and the latest wave of refugees fleeing conflict further afield. She discovers a region that has been shaped by the successive forces of history: by its own past migration crises, by communism, by two World wars, by the Ottoman Empire, and - older still - by the ancient legacy of myths and legends. As Kapka Kassabova explores this enigmatic region in the company of border guards and treasure hunters, entrepreneurs and botanists, psychic healers and ritual fire-walkers, refugees and smugglers, she traces the physical and psychological borders that criss-cross its villages and mountains, and goes in search of the stories that will unlock its secrets. Border is a sharply observed portrait of a little-known corner of Europe, and a fascinating meditation on the borderlines that exist between countries, between cultures, between people, and within each of us.

Rising Ground

A Search for the Spirit of Place

Author: Philip Marsden

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022636612X

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 7015

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In 2010, Philip Marsden, whom Giles Foden has called “one of our most thoughtful travel writers,” moved with his family to a rundown farmhouse in the countryside in Cornwall. From the moment he arrived, Marsden found himself fascinated by the landscape around him, and, in particular, by the traces of human history—and of the human relationship to the land—that could be seen all around him. Wanting to experience the idea more fully, he set out to walk across Cornwall, to the evocatively named Land’s End. Rising Ground is a record of that journey, but it is also so much more: a beautifully written meditation on place, nature, and human life that encompasses history, archaeology, geography, and the love of place that suffuses us when we finally find home. Firmly in a storied tradition of English nature writing that stretches from Gilbert White to Helen MacDonald, Rising Ground reveals the ways that places and peoples have interacted over time, from standing stones to footpaths, ancient habitations to modern highways. What does it mean to truly live in a place, and what does it take to understand, and honor, those who lived and died there long before we arrived? Like the best travel and nature writing, Rising Ground is written with the pace of a contemplative walk, and is rich with insight and a powerful sense of the long skein of years that links us to our ancestors. Marsden’s close, loving look at the small patch of earth around him is sure to help you see your own place—and your own home—anew.

The Shadowy Horses

Author: Susanna Kearsley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501184784

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 7621

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A modern tale of love, war, and historical intrigue from New York Times and Globe and Mail bestselling author, Susanna Kearsley. When Verity Grey is asked to join archaeologist Peter Quinnell’s dig on the Scottish Borderlands, she is thrilled. She has long been drawn to the dark legends of the area, and Quinnell has spent his whole life searching for the resting place of the invincible ninth Roman Legion, which marched from York to fight the Northern tribes before mysteriously vanishing from the pages of history. But after her first day on the job, Verity isn’t sure she’s made the right decision. Her eccentric boss is convinced he’s finally found what he’s been looking for—not because of any scientific evidence, but because a local boy has “seen” a Roman soldier walking in the fields, a ghostly sentinel guarding the bodies of his long-dead comrades. Despite Verity’s misgivings, it soon becomes clear that there must indeed be secrets lying beneath the windswept shores, because someone is intent on sabotaging the dig. What do the sentinel’s urgent warnings mean? And who is trying so desperately to drive the team away and keep what is buried hidden?

Notes from a Small Island

Author: Bill Bryson

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062417436

Category: Travel

Page: 368

View: 9180

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Before New York Times bestselling author Bill Bryson wrote The Road to Little Dribbling, he took this delightfully irreverent jaunt around the unparalleled floating nation of Great Britain, which has produced zebra crossings, Shakespeare, Twiggie Winkie’s Farm, and places with names like Farleigh Wallop and Titsey.

Scotland, Britain, Empire

Writing the Highlands, 1760-1860

Author: Kenneth McNeil

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 0814210473

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 7002

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"Scotland, Britain, Empire takes on a cliche that permeates writing from and about the literature of the Scottish Highlands. Popular and influential in its time, this literature fell into disrepute for circulating a distorted and deforming myth that aided in Scotland's marginalization by consigning Scottish culture into the past while drawing a mist over harsher realities." "Kenneth McNeil invokes recent work in postcolonial studies to show how British writers of the Romantic period were actually shaping a more complex national and imperial consciousness. He discusses canonical works - the works of James Macpherson and Sir Walter Scott - and noncanonical and nonliterary works - particularly in the fields of historiography, anthropology, and sociology. This book calls for a rethinking of the "romanticization" of the Highlands and shows that Scottish writing on the Highlands reflects the unique circumstances of a culture simultaneously feeling the weight of imperial "anglobalization" while playing a vital role in its inception."--BOOK JACKET.

The Maze

A Desert Journey

Author: Lucy Rees

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780816518319

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 624

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Author Lucy Rees and a companion travel across the Arizona desert to the Hopi Indian mesas, where they search for an ancient stone carving similar to one in their native Wales. The stone's intricate design becomes a purpose for their trek as well as a metaphor for the journey itself. Humorous and wise, the book is both a bold adventure and a moving account of tragedy and hope.