The Murals of Cacaxtla

The Power of Painting in Ancient Central Mexico

Author: Claudia Lozoff Brittenham,María Teresa Uriarte

Publisher: Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 295

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"Between AD 650 and 950, a small city-state in central Mexico produced dazzling murals of gods, historical figures, and supernatural creatures on the walls of its most important sacred and public spaces. This study explores how the Cacaxtla murals constitute a sustained and local painting tradition, in which generations of ancient Mexican artists, patrons, and audiences created a powerful statement of communal identity that still captures the imagination"--

The Memory of Bones

Body, Being, and Experience among the Classic Maya

Author: Stephen Houston,David Stuart,Karl Taube

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292756186

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 7190

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All of human experience flows from bodies that feel, express emotion, and think about what such experiences mean. But is it possible for us, embodied as we are in a particular time and place, to know how people of long ago thought about the body and its experiences? In this groundbreaking book, three leading experts on the Classic Maya (ca. AD 250 to 850) marshal a vast array of evidence from Maya iconography and hieroglyphic writing, as well as archaeological findings, to argue that the Classic Maya developed a coherent approach to the human body that we can recover and understand today. The authors open with a cartography of the Maya body, its parts and their meanings, as depicted in imagery and texts. They go on to explore such issues as how the body was replicated in portraiture; how it experienced the world through ingestion, the senses, and the emotions; how the body experienced war and sacrifice and the pain and sexuality that were intimately bound up in these domains; how words, often heaven-sent, could be embodied; and how bodies could be blurred through spirit possession. From these investigations, the authors convincingly demonstrate that the Maya conceptualized the body in varying roles, as a metaphor of time, as a gendered, sexualized being, in distinct stages of life, as an instrument of honor and dishonor, as a vehicle for communication and consumption, as an exemplification of beauty and ugliness, and as a dancer and song-maker. Their findings open a new avenue for empathetically understanding the ancient Maya as living human beings who experienced the world as we do, through the body.

The Art of Urbanism

How Mesoamerican Kingdoms Represented Themselves in Architecture and Imagery

Author: William Leonard Fash,Leonardo López Luján

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780884023449

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 9130

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The Art of Urbanism explores how the royal courts of powerful Mesoamerican centers represented their kingdoms in architectural, iconographic, and cosmological terms. Through an investigation of the ecological contexts and environmental opportunities of urban centers, the contributors consider how ancient Mesoamerican cities defined themselves and reflected upon their physicalâe"and metaphysicalâe"place via their built environment. Themes in the volume include the ways in which a kingdomâe(tm)s public monuments were fashioned to reflect geographic space, patron gods, and mythology, and how the Olmec, Maya, Mexica, Zapotecs, and others sought to center their world through architectural monuments and public art. This collection of papers addresses how communities leveraged their environment and built upon their cultural and historical roots as well as the ways that the performance of calendrical rituals and other public events tied individuals and communities to both urban centers and hinterlands. Twenty-three scholars from archaeology, anthropology, art history, and religious studies contribute new data and new perspectives to the understanding of ancient Mesoamericansâe(tm) own view of their spectacular urban and ritual centers.

Archaeology in Latin America

Author: Benjamin Alberti,Gustavo G. Politis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134597835

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 2461

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This pioneering and comprehensive survey is the first overview of current themes in Latin American archaeology written solely by academics native to the region, and it makes their collected expertise available to an English-speaking audience for the first time. The contributors cover the most significant issues in the archaeology of Latin America, such as the domestication of camelids, the emergence of urban society in Mesoamerica, the frontier of the Inca empire, and the relatively little known archaeology of the Amazon basin. This book draws together key areas of research in Latin American archaeological thought into a coherent whole; no other volume on this area has ever dealt with such a diverse range of subjects, and some of the countries examined have never before been the subject of a regional study.

The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court

Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak

Author: Mary Miller,Claudia Brittenham

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292744363

Category: Art

Page: 285

View: 5550

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Located within the deep tropical rainforest of Chiapas, Mexico, the Maya site of Bonampak is home to the most complete and magnificent mural program of the ancient Americas. In three rooms, a pageant of rulership opens up, scene by scene, like pages of an ancient Maya book. Painted c. AD 800, the murals of Bonampak reveal a complex and multifaceted view of the ancient Maya at the end of their splendor during the last days of the Classic era. Members of the royal court engage in rituals and perform human sacrifice, dance in extravagant costumes and strip the clothing from fallen captives, acknowledge foreign nobles, and receive abundant tribute. The murals are a powerful and sophisticated reflection on the spectacle of courtly life and the nature of artistic practice, a window onto a world that could not know its doomed future. This major new study of the paintings of Bonampak incorporates insights from decades of art historical, epigraphic, and technical investigation of the murals, framing questions about artistic conception, facture, narrative, performance, and politics. Lavishly illustrated, this book assembles thorough documentation of the Bonampak mural program, from historical photographs of the paintings—some never before published—to new full-color reconstructions by artist Heather Hurst, recipient of a MacArthur award, and Leonard Ashby. The book also includes a catalog of photographs, infrared images, and line drawings of the murals, as well as images of all the glyphic texts, which are published in their entirety for the first time. Written in an engaging style that invites both specialists and general readers alike, this book will stand as the definitive presentation of the paintings for years to come.

Centuries of Silence

The Story of Latin American Journalism

Author: Leonardo Ferreira

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275983970

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 332

View: 1624

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Debunks the myth of a free press in Latin America.

Latin American Art and Music

A Handbook for Teaching

Author: Judith Page Horton

Publisher: University of Texas Inst of Latin

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 174

View: 7405

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This collection of essays, curriculum units, and study guides on Latin American art and musical traditions is designed to help interested teachers take a comprehensive approach to teaching these subjects. The introduction features the essay, "Media Resources Available on Latin American Culture: A Survey of Art, Architecture, and Music Articles Appearing in Americas" (K. Murray). Section 1, The Visual Arts of Latin America, has the following articles: "The Latin American Box: Environmental Aesthetics in the Classroom" (R. Robkin); "Mascaras y Danzas de Mexico y Guatemala" (J. Winzinger); "The Five Creations and Four Destructions of the Aztec World" (C. Simmons; R. Gaytan); "Art Forms of Quetzalcoatl: A Teaching Guide for Spanish, History, and Art Classes" (A. P. Crick); "The Art and Architecture of Mesoamerica: An Overview" (J. Quirarte); "Interpreting the Aztec Calendar" (L. Hall); "Mexican Muralism: Its Social-Educative Roles in Latin America and the United States" (S. Goldman); "Mexico: An Artist's History" (K. Jones); "A Historical Survey of Chicano Murals in the Southwest" (A. Rodriguez); and "El Dia de los Muertos" (C. Hickman). Section 2, The Musical Heritage of Latin America, has an introduction: "The Study of Latin American Folk Music and the Classroom" (G. Behague) and the following articles: "Value Clarification of the Chicano Culture through Music and Dance" (R. R. de Guerrero); "'La Bamba': Reflections of Many People" (J. Taylor); "The Latin American Art Music Tradition: Some Criteria for Selection of Teaching Materials" (M. Kuss); "Mariachi Guide" (B. San Miguel); "'El Tamborito': The Panamanian Musical Heritage" (N. Samuda); "A Journey through the History of Music in Latin America" (J. Orrego-Salas); "A Multicultural Tapestry for Young People" (V. Gachen); and "A Survey of Mexican Popular Music" (A. Krohn). A list of Education Service Centers in Texas is in the appendix. (DB)

Cycles of Time and Meaning in the Mexican Books of Fate

Author: Elizabeth Hill Boone

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292756569

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 4882

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In communities throughout precontact Mesoamerica, calendar priests and diviners relied on pictographic almanacs to predict the fate of newborns, to guide people in choosing marriage partners and auspicious wedding dates, to know when to plant and harvest crops, and to be successful in many of life's activities. As the Spanish colonized Mesoamerica in the sixteenth century, they made a determined effort to destroy these books, in which the Aztec and neighboring peoples recorded their understanding of the invisible world of the sacred calendar and the cosmic forces and supernaturals that adhered to time. Today, only a few of these divinatory codices survive. Visually complex, esoteric, and strikingly beautiful, painted books such as the famous Codex Borgia and Codex Borbonicus still serve as portals into the ancient Mexican calendrical systems and the cycles of time and meaning they encode. In this comprehensive study, Elizabeth Hill Boone analyzes the entire extant corpus of Mexican divinatory codices and offers a masterful explanation of the genre as a whole. She introduces the sacred, divinatory calendar and the calendar priests and diviners who owned and used the books. Boone then explains the graphic vocabulary of the calendar and its prophetic forces and describes the organizing principles that structure the codices. She shows how they form almanacs that either offer general purpose guidance or focus topically on specific aspects of life, such as birth, marriage, agriculture and rain, travel, and the forces of the planet Venus. Boone also tackles two major areas of controversy—the great narrative passage in the Codex Borgia, which she freshly interprets as a cosmic narrative of creation, and the disputed origins of the codices, which, she argues, grew out of a single religious and divinatory system.

Veiled Brightness

A History of Ancient Maya Color

Author: Stephen Houston,Claudia Brittenham,Cassandra Mesick,Alexandre Tokovinine,Christina Warinner

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292719002

Category: Social Science

Page: 162

View: 9338

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Color is an integral part of human experience, so common as to be overlooked or treated as unimportant. Yet color is both unavoidable and varied. Each culture classifies, understands, and uses it in different and often surprising ways, posing particular challenges to those who study color from long-ago times and places far distant. Veiled Brightness reconstructs what color meant to the ancient Maya, a set of linked peoples and societies who flourished in and around the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and Central America. By using insights from archaeology, linguistics, art history, and conservation, the book charts over two millennia of color use in a region celebrated for its aesthetic refinement and high degree of craftsmanship. The authors open with a survey of approaches to color perception, looking at Aristotelian color theory, recent discoveries in neurophysiology, and anthropological research on color. Maya color terminology receives new attention here, clarifying not just basic color terms, but also the extensional or associated meanings that enriched ancient Maya perception of color. The materials and technologies of Maya color production are assembled in one place as never before, providing an invaluable reference for future research. From these investigations, the authors demonstrate that Maya use of color changed over time, through a sequence of historical and artistic developments that drove the elaboration of new pigments and coloristic effects. These findings open fresh avenues for investigation of ancient Maya aesthetics and worldview and provide a model for how to study the meaning and making of color in other ancient civilizations.

Human Sacrifice, Militarism, and Rulership

Materialization of State Ideology at the Feathered Serpent Pyramid, Teotihuacan

Author: Saburo Sugiyama

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521780568

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 7680

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Teotihuacan was one of the earliest and more populous preColumbian cities, and the Feathered Serpent was its vital monument, erected circa 200 AD. This work explores the religious meanings and political implications of the pyramid with meticulous and thorough analyses of substantially new excavation data. Challenging the traditional view of the city as a legendary, sacred, or anonymously-governed centre, the book provides significant new insights on the Teotihuacan polity and society. It provides interpretations on the pyramid's location, architecture, sculptures, iconography, mass sacrificial graves and rich symbolic offerings, and concludes that the pyramid commemorated the accession of rulers who were inscribed to govern with military force on behalf of the gods. This archaeological examination of the monument shows it to be the physical manifestation of state ideologies such as the symbolism of human sacrifice, militarism, and individual-centred divine authority, ideologies which were later diffused among other Mesoamerican urban centres.

The Pre-Columbian Painting

Murals of the Mesoamerica

Author: Beatriz de la Fuente

Publisher: Jaca Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 7294

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This unique work of reference is produced by the Instituto de Investigaciones Esteticas (University of Mexico City -- UNAM), responsible for the first catalogue of the mural painting of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Although few of these paintings have survived the passing of time, what remains is a priceless testimony of an extremely refined, sometimes strongly dramatic, artistic sensibility.

The Jaguar Within

Shamanic Trance in Ancient Central and South American Art

Author: Rebecca R. Stone

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292749503

Category: Social Science

Page: 243

View: 9060

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Shamanism—the practice of entering a trance state to experience visions of a reality beyond the ordinary and to gain esoteric knowledge—has been an important part of life for indigenous societies throughout the Americas from prehistoric times until the present. Much has been written about shamanism in both scholarly and popular literature, but few authors have linked it to another significant visual realm—art. In this pioneering study, Rebecca R. Stone considers how deep familiarity with, and profound respect for, the extra-ordinary visionary experiences of shamanism profoundly affected the artistic output of indigenous cultures in Central and South America before the European invasions of the sixteenth century. Using ethnographic accounts of shamanic trance experiences, Stone defines a core set of trance vision characteristics, including enhanced senses, ego dissolution, bodily distortions, flying, spinning and undulating sensations, synaesthesia, and physical transformation from the human self into animal and other states of being. Stone then traces these visionary characteristics in ancient artworks from Costa Rica and Peru. She makes a convincing case that these works, especially those of the Moche, depict shamans in a trance state or else convey the perceptual experience of visions by creating deliberately chaotic and distorted conglomerations of partial, inverted, and incoherent images.

At Home with the Aztecs

An Archaeologist Uncovers Their Daily Life

Author: Michael Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317328256

Category: Social Science

Page: 158

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At Home with the Aztecs provides a fresh view of Aztec society, focusing on households and communities instead of kings, pyramids, and human sacrifice. This new approach offers an opportunity to humanize the Aztecs, moving past the popular stereotype of sacrificial maniacs to demonstrate that these were successful and prosperous communities. Michael Smith also engagingly describes the scientific, logistic and personal dimensions of archaeological fieldwork, drawing on decades of excavating experience and considering how his research was affected by his interaction with contemporary Mexican communities. Through first-hand accounts of the ways archaeologists interpret sites and artifacts, the book illuminates how the archaeological process can provide information about ancient families. Facilitating a richer understanding of the Aztec world, Smith’s research also redefines success, prosperity and resilience in ancient societies, making this book suitable not only for those interested in the Aztecs but in the examination of complex societies in general.

Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory

Author: Frances F. Berdan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521881277

Category: History

Page: 366

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This book provides an up-to-date synthesis of Aztec culture, encompassing topics of history, economy, social life, political relations, and religious beliefs and ceremonies. It offers an integrated view of Aztec life, grappling with thorny issues such as human sacrifice and the controversial role of up-and-coming merchants. The book meshes data, methods, and theories from a variety of disciplines including archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnography, and art history.

The One Page CV

Create your own high impact CV. Clever, clear, and comprehensive. Get noticed and beat the competition.

Author: Paul Hichens

Publisher: Pearson UK

ISBN: 1292001496

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 3082

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Say less and stand out more. About six seconds – that’s how long your CV will be considered before it’s consigned to the bin forever. If you don’t grab attention quickly, you’ll be rejected without a second thought. Your CV must be high impact, concise and optimised if it’s to do its job, and The One Page CV shows you exactly how to do it. It’s proven to work. It’s tried and tested. It’s written by an expert. · Avoid the pitfalls that your competition will be making · Transform your CV into a targeted, high-impact, job-winning tool · Spotlight your professional skills, qualifications and experience · Write smartly and persuasively so recruiters want to read your CV Remember – you’ve got six seconds. That’s all. Why waste it?

The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians

Author: Richard J. Chacon,David H. Dye

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387483039

Category: Social Science

Page: 680

View: 3055

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This edited volume mainly focuses on the practice of taking and displaying various body parts as trophies in both North and South America. The editors and contributors (which include Native Peoples from both continents) examine the evidence and causes of Amerindian trophy taking. Additionally, they present objectively and discuss dispassionately the topic of human proclivity toward ritual violence. This book fills the gap in literature on this subject.

Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya

Author: Mary Ellen Miller,Simon Martin

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 9780500051290

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 4227

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A showcase of the breathtaking art of an ancient people features hundreds of illustrations that, combined with the latest research into and archaeological discoveries about Maya society, demonstrates the complexity and artistic genius of this legendary culture.

The Archaeology and History of Colonial Mexico

Mixing Epistemologies

Author: Enrique Rodríguez-Alegría

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107111641

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 9087

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An archaeological and historical study of Mexico City and Xaltocan, focusing on the years after the 1521 Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.