The Navigation of Feeling

A Framework for the History of Emotions

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521004725

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 1289

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Offers a theory that explains the impact of emotions on historical change.

The Navigation of Feeling

A Framework for the History of Emotions

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139430602

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7446

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In The Navigation of Feeling: A Framework for the History of Emotions, William M. Reddy offers a theory of emotions which both critiques and expands upon recent research in the fields of anthropology and psychology. Exploring the links between emotion and cognition, between culture and emotional expression, Reddy applies this theory of emotions to the processes of history. He demonstrates how emotions change over time, how emotions have a very important impact on the course of events, and how different social orders either facilitate or constrain emotional life. In an investigation of Revolutionary France, where sentimentalism in literature and philosophy had promised a new and unprecedented kind of emotional liberty, Reddy's theory of emotions and historical change is successfully put to the test.

The Navigation of Feeling

A Framework for the History of Emotions

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521803038

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 2234

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The Navigation of Feeling critiques recent psychological and anthropological research on emotions. William M. Reddy offers a new theory of emotions and historical change, drawing on research from many academic disciplines. This new theory makes it possible to see how emotions change over time, how emotions have a very important impact on the shape of history, and how different social orders either facilitate emotional life or make it more difficult. This theory is fully explored in a case study of the French Revolution.

The Making of Romantic Love

Longing and Sexuality in Europe, South Asia, and Japan, 900-1200 CE

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226706281

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 1718

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In the twelfth century, the Catholic Church attempted a thoroughgoing reform of marriage and sexual behavior aimed at eradicating sexual desire from Christian lives. Seeking a refuge from the very serious condemnations of the Church and relying on a courtly culture that was already preoccupied with honor and secrecy, European poets, romance writers, and lovers devised a vision of love as something quite different from desire. Romantic love was thus born as a movement of covert resistance. In The Making of Romantic Love: Longing and Sexuality in Europe, South Asia, and Japan, William M. Reddy illuminates the birth of a cultural movement that managed to regulate selfish desire and render it innocent—or innocent enough. Reddy strikes out from this historical moment on an international exploration of love, contrasting the medieval development of romantic love in Europe with contemporaneous eastern traditions in Bengal and Orissa, and in Heian Japan from 900-1200 CE, where one finds no trace of an opposition between love and desire. In this comparative framework, Reddy tells an appealing tale about the rise and fall of various practices of longing, underscoring the uniqueness of the European concept of sexual desire.

Emotions in History – Lost and Found

Author: Ute Frevert

Publisher: Central European University Press

ISBN: 6155053340

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 255

View: 2380

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Coming to terms with emotions and how they influence human behaviour, seems to be of the utmost importance to societies that are obsessed with everything “neuro.” On the other hand, emotions have become an object of constant individual and social manipulation since “emotional intelligence” emerged as a buzzword of our times. Reflecting on this burgeoning interest in human emotions makes one think of how this interest developed and what fuelled it. From a historian’s point of view, it can be traced back to classical antiquity. But it has undergone shifts and changes which can in turn shed light on social concepts of the self and its relation to other human beings (and nature). The volume focuses on the historicity of emotions and explores the processes that brought them to the fore of public interest and debate.

What is the History of Emotions?

Author: Barbara H. Rosenwein,Riccardo Cristiani

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509508538

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 9302

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What Is the History of Emotions? offers an accessible path through the thicket of approaches, debates, and past and current trends in the history of emotions. Although historians have always talked about how people felt in the past, it is only in the last two decades that they have found systematic and well-grounded ways to treat the topic. Rosenwein and Cristiani begin with the science of emotion, explaining what contemporary psychologists and neuropsychologists think emotions are. They continue with the major early, foundational approaches to the history of emotions, and they treat in depth new work that emphasizes the role of the body and its gestures. Along the way, they discuss how ideas about emotions and their history have been incorporated into modern literature and technology, from children's books to videogames. Students, teachers, and anyone else interested in emotions and how to think about them historically will find this book to be an indispensable and fascinating guide not only to the past but to what may lie ahead.

Generations of Feeling

A History of Emotions, 600-1700

Author: Barbara H. Rosenwein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107480841

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 2409

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An exploration of emotional life in the West, considering the varieties, transformations and constants of human emotions over eleven centuries.

The History of Emotions

An Introduction

Author: Jan Plamper

Publisher: Emotions in History

ISBN: 0199668337

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3328

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The history of emotions is one of the fastest growing fields in current historical debate, and this is the first book-length introduction to the field, synthesizing the current research, and offering direction for future study. The History of Emotions is organized around the debate between social constructivist and universalist theories of emotion that has shaped most emotions research in a variety of disciplines for more than a hundred years: social constructivists believe that emotions are largely learned and subject to historical change, while universalists insist on the timelessness and pan-culturalism of emotions. In historicizing and problematizing this binary, Jan Plamper opens emotions research beyond constructivism and universalism; he also maps a vast terrain of thought about feelings in anthropology, philosophy, sociology, linguistics, art history, political science, the life sciences; from nineteenth-century experimental psychology to the latest affective neuroscience; and history, from ancient times to the present day.

The Reformation of Feeling

Shaping the Religious Emotions in Early Modern Germany

Author: Susan C. Karant-Nunn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199741991

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 463

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In The Reformation of Feeling, Susan Karant-Nunn looks beyond and beneath the formal doctrinal and moral demands of the Reformation in Germany to examine the emotional tenor of the programs that the emerging creeds--revised Catholicism, Lutheranism, and Calvinism/Reformed theology--developed for their members. As revealed by the surviving sermons from this period, preaching clergy of each faith both explicitly and implicitly provided their listeners with distinct models of a mood to be cultivated. To encourage their parishioners to make an emotional investment in their faith, all three groups drew upon rhetorical elements that were already present in late medieval Catholicism and elevated them into confessional touchstones. This book is exceptional in its presentation of a cultural rather than theological or behavioral study of the broader movement to remake Christianity. As Karant-Nunn conclusively demonstrates, in the eyes of the Reformation's formative personalities strict adherence to doctrine and upright demeanor did not constitute an adequate piety. The truly devout had to engage their hearts in their faith.

The Future of Class in History

What's Left of the Social?

Author: Geoff Eley,Keith Nield

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472069644

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 7340

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Unifying concepts are essential when studying history. They provide students and scholars with ways to organize their thoughts, research, and writings. However, these concepts are also the focus of myriad conflicts within the field. Social history has experienced more than its share of such conflicts since its inception some forty years ago. In recent times the fields of “the social” and of “culture” have sometimes been presented as mutually exclusive and even hostile. Once again, conceptual innovation in history has been cast as a closure by which the new drives out the old: in this case, cultural history radically displacing social history. The Future of Class in History analyzes the effect of the conflict that followed the “turn to culture” in historical work by examining the use of class and demonstrates how practitioners in multiple fields can collaborate to produce the highest quality scholarship. “Offers new ways of thinking about ‘class’ and ‘society’ in a world in which such categories have been radically called into question.” —Sherry Ortner, University of California, Los Angeles “Brilliantly charts social history’s past achievement, present dilemma, and future promise in a work distinguished by intellectual openness and generosity.” —James A. Epstein, Vanderbilt University “Eley and Nield seek to rescue the deluded follower of social history from the enormous condescension of the cultural turn. They succeed admirably, making the case for a new hybrid socio-cultural history.” —Donald Reid, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill “This terrific double act has once again produced a text that demands to be read by all those tired of the juxtaposition of social and cultural histories and still interested in the problematic of class and the politics of its past and present.” —James Vernon, University of California, Berkeley “Eley and Nield tackle a contentious debate with a gracious plea for collaboration. Their strong desire to get past the ‘culture wars’ and to engage social and cultural historians in fruitful dialogue is a welcome move, stylishly executed.” —Philippa Levine, University of Southern California Geoff Eley is Professor of History at the University of Michigan. Keith Nield is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Hull.

The Invisible Code

Honor and Sentiment in Postrevolutionary France, 1814-1848

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520205369

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 7149

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Starting from the premise that private feeling cannot be contained or eliminated from public deliberation or action, William M. Reddy embarks on a fascinating inquiry into the influence of honor on behavior in nineteenth-century France. He discovers that French society was governed by a strict code of honor and that males in particular were vulnerable to acute feelings of shame, while any other feelings--referred to as "sentiment"--were considered the special domain of women. Examining the realms of both marriage and the public sphere, Reddy uncovers the feelings of shame and self-esteem, fear and desire, that entered in an unperceived yet fundamental way into the sense of self that many elite men and women worked out in the course of their lives. Reddy draws from archival documents spanning the disparate realms of marriage, bureaucracy, education, the fledgling profession of journalism, and literature from 1814 to 1848. Inspired by the research of women's studies and the history of gender, he explores the relationship between gender and emotion, and reveals the threads that held the social order together and gave coherence to peoples' lives and identities. Starting from the premise that private feeling cannot be contained or eliminated from public deliberation or action, William M. Reddy embarks on a fascinating inquiry into the influence of honor on behavior in nineteenth-century France. He discovers that French society was governed by a strict code of honor and that males in particular were vulnerable to acute feelings of shame, while any other feelings--referred to as "sentiment"--were considered the special domain of women. Examining the realms of both marriage and the public sphere, Reddy uncovers the feelings of shame and self-esteem, fear and desire, that entered in an unperceived yet fundamental way into the sense of self that many elite men and women worked out in the course of their lives. Reddy draws from archival documents spanning the disparate realms of marriage, bureaucracy, education, the fledgling profession of journalism, and literature from 1814 to 1848. Inspired by the research of women's studies and the history of gender, he explores the relationship between gender and emotion, and reveals the threads that held the social order together and gave coherence to peoples' lives and identities.

From Passions to Emotions

The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category

Author: Thomas Dixon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139436977

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 322

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Today there is a thriving 'emotions industry' to which philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists are contributing. Yet until two centuries ago 'the emotions' did not exist. In this path-breaking study Thomas Dixon shows how, during the nineteenth century, the emotions came into being as a distinct psychological category, replacing existing categories such as appetites, passions, sentiments and affections. By examining medieval and eighteenth-century theological psychologies and placing Charles Darwin and William James within a broader and more complex nineteenth-century setting, Thomas Dixon argues that this domination by one single descriptive category is not healthy. Overinclusivity of 'the emotions' hampers attempts to argue with any subtlety about the enormous range of mental states and stances of which humans are capable. This book is an important contribution to the debate about emotion and rationality which has preoccupied western thinkers throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and has implications for contemporary debates.

The History of Emotions

Author: Rob Boddice

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1526126001

Category: History

Page: N.A

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This book introduces students and professional historians to the main areas of concern in the history of emotions. It discusses how the emotions intersect with other lines of historical research relating to power, practice, society and morality. Addressing criticism from within and without the discipline of history, the book offers a rigorous defence of this new approach, demonstrating its potential centrality to historiographical practice, as well as the importance of this kind of historical work for our general understanding of the human brain and the meaning of human experience.

Embodied Emotions

A Naturalist Approach to a Normative Phenomenon

Author: Rebekka Hufendiek

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317329023

Category: Philosophy

Page: 202

View: 7918

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In this book, Rebekka Hufendiek explores emotions as embodied, action-oriented representations, providing a non-cognitivist theory of emotions that accounts for their normative dimensions. Embodied Emotions focuses not only on the bodily reactions involved in emotions, but also on the environment within which emotions are embedded and on the social character of this environment, its ontological constitution, and the way it scaffolds both the development of particular emotion types and the unfolding of individual emotional episodes. In addition, it provides a critical review and appraisal of current empirical studies, mainly in psychophysiology and developmental psychology, which are relevant to discussions about whether emotions are embodied as well as socially embedded. The theory that Hufendiek puts forward denies the distinction between basic and higher cognitive emotions: all emotions are embodied, action-oriented representations. This approach can account for the complex normative structure of emotions, and shares the advantages of cognitivist accounts of emotions without sharing their problems. Embodied Emotions makes an original contribution to ongoing debates on the normative aspects of emotions and will be of interest to philosophers working on emotions, embodied cognition and situated cognition, as well as neuroscientists or psychologists who study emotions and are interested in placing their own work within a broader theoretical framework.

Keeping Up with the Joneses

Envy in American Consumer Society, 1890-1930

Author: Susan J. Matt

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812202724

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 2573

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A century ago many Americans condemned envy as a destructive emotion and a sin. Today few Americans expect criticism when they express envy, and some commentators maintain that the emotion drives the economy. This shift in attitude is Susan Matt's central concern. Keeping up with the Joneses: Envy in American Consumer Society, 1890-1930 examines a key transition in the meaning of envy for the American middle class. Although people certainly have experienced envy throughout history, the expansion of the consumer economy at the turn of the twentieth century dramatically reshaped the social role of the emotion. Matt looks at how different groups within the middle class—men in white-collar jobs, bourgeois women, farm families, and children—responded to the transformation in social and cultural life. Keeping Up with the Joneses traces how attitudes about envy changed as department stores, mail-order catalogs, magazines, movies, and advertising became more prevalent, and the mass production of imitation luxury goods offered middle- and working-class individuals the opportunity to emulate upper-class life. Between 1890 and 1910 moralists sought to tame envy and emulation in order to uphold a moral economy and preserve social order. They criticized the liberal-capitalist preoccupation with personal striving and advancement and praised the virtue of contentment. They admonished the bourgeoisie to be satisfied with their circumstances and cease yearning for their neighbors' possessions. After 1910 more secular commentators gained ground, repudiating the doctrine of contentment and rejecting the notion that there were divinely ordained limits on what each class should possess. They encouraged everyone to pursue the objects of desire. Envy was no longer a sin, but a valuable economic stimulant. The expansion of consumer economy fostered such institutions as department stores and advertising firms, but it also depended on a transformation in attitudes and emotional codes. Matt explores the ways gender, geography, and age shaped this transformation. Bridging the history of emotions and the history of consumerism, she uncovers the connection between changing social norms and the growth of the consumer economy.

Money and Liberty in Modern Europe

A Critique of Historical Understanding

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521315098

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 264

View: 4534

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The concept of class, along with its correlates -m class interest, class conflict, class consciousness - ramain indispensable tools of historical explanation. Yet research over the last twenty-five years, especially on the histories of England, France, and Germany, has revealed an increasingly poor fit between these concepts and the reality they purport to explain. Some historians have reacted by rejecting class; others have proposed bold revisions in our understanding of it that enable it to encompass new research findings. This study does neither. Instead, building on interpretive method Professor Reddy proposes to replace class with an alternative concept that seeks to capture from a new angle the fundamental relations of exchange and authority that have shaped social life in modern Europe.

Doing Emotions History

Author: Susan J. Matt,Peter N. Stearns

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252095324

Category: Psychology

Page: 224

View: 3072

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How do emotions change over time? When is hate honorable? What happens when "love" is translated into different languages? Such questions are now being addressed by historians who trace how emotions have been expressed and understood in different cultures throughout history. Doing Emotions History explores the history of feelings such as love, joy, grief, nostalgia as well as a wide range of others, bringing together the latest and most innovative scholarship on the history of the emotions. Spanning the globe from Asia and Europe to North America, the book provides a crucial overview of this emerging discipline. An international group of scholars reviews the field's current status and variations, addresses many of its central debates, provides models and methods, and proposes an array of possibilities for future research. Emphasizing the field's intersections with anthropology, psychology, sociology, neuroscience, data-mining, and popular culture, this groundbreaking volume demonstrates the affecting potential of doing emotions history. Contributors are John Corrigan, Pam Epstein, Nicole Eustace, Norman Kutcher, Brent Malin, Susan Matt, Darrin McMahon, Peter N. Stearns, and Mark Steinberg.

The Rise of Market Culture

The Textile Trade and French Society, 1750-1900

Author: William M. Reddy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521347792

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 416

View: 4563

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Professor Reddy traces the transition from pre-capitalist to capitalist culture in the French textile industry from 1750 to 1900. Using anthropology and social history, he shows how and why the conception of the social order based on the idea of the market began to emerge, and examines the attendant political and social conflict.

The Emotion Machine

Commonsense Thinking, Artificial Intelligence, and the Future of the Human Mind

Author: Marvin Minsky

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416579303

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 7094

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In this mind-expanding book, scientific pioneer Marvin Minsky continues his groundbreaking research, offering a fascinating new model for how our minds work. He argues persuasively that emotions, intuitions, and feelings are not distinct things, but different ways of thinking. By examining these different forms of mind activity, Minsky says, we can explain why our thought sometimes takes the form of carefully reasoned analysis and at other times turns to emotion. He shows how our minds progress from simple, instinctive kinds of thought to more complex forms, such as consciousness or self-awareness. And he argues that because we tend to see our thinking as fragmented, we fail to appreciate what powerful thinkers we really are. Indeed, says Minsky, if thinking can be understood as the step-by-step process that it is, then we can build machines -- artificial intelligences -- that not only can assist with our thinking by thinking as we do but have the potential to be as conscious as we are. Eloquently written, The Emotion Machine is an intriguing look into a future where more powerful artificial intelligences await.

Early Modern Emotions

An Introduction

Author: Susan Broomhall

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315441357

Category: History

Page: 386

View: 9800

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Early Modern Emotions is a student-friendly introduction to the concepts, approaches and sources used to study emotions in early modern Europe, and to the perspectives that analysis of the history of emotions can offer early modern studies more broadly. The volume is divided into four sections that guide students through the key processes and practices employed in current research on the history of emotions. The first explains how key terms and concepts in the study of emotions relate to early modern Europe, while the second focuses on the unique ways in which emotions were conceptualized at the time. The third section introduces a range of sources and methodologies that are used to analyse early modern emotions. The final section includes a wide-ranging selection of thematic topics covering war, religion, family, politics, art, music, literature and the non-human world to show how analysis of emotions may offer new perspectives on the early modern period more broadly. Each section offers bite-sized, accessible commentaries providing students new to the history of emotions with the tools to begin their own investigations. Each entry is supported by annotated further reading recommendations pointing students to the latest research in that area and at the end of the book is a general bibliography, which provides a comprehensive list of current scholarship. This book is the perfect starting point for any student wishing to study emotions in early modern Europe.