Three Generations, No Imbeciles

Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck V. Bell

Author: Paul A. Lombardo

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801890101

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 7929

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Looks at the case Buck v. Bell, covering the events of the trial and the 1927 Supreme Court case which upheld Virginia's compulsory sterilization of "feebleminded" individuals.

Imbeciles

The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck

Author: Adam Cohen

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0143109995

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3750

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"In 1927, the Supreme Court handed down a ruling so disturbing, ignorant, and cruel that it stands as one of the great injustices in American History. In Imbeciles, bestselling author Adam Cohen exposes the court's decision to allow the sterilization of a young woman, Carrie Buck, it wrongly thought to be 'feebleminded' and to champion the mass eugenic sterilization of undesirable citizens. The 8-1 ruling was signed by many revered figures in American law -- including Chief Justice William Howard Taft, a former U.S. president; and Louis Brandeis, a progressive icon. Oliver Wendell Holmes, considered by many to be the greatest Supreme Court Justice in history, wrote the majority opinion, declaring, 'Three generations of imbeciles are enough.' In this shocking story, Cohen overturns cherished myths and demolishes lauded figures in relentless pursuit of the truth. With the intellectual force of a legal brief and the passion of a front-page exposé, Imbeciles is an ardent indictment of our champions of justice and our optimistic faith in progress, as well as a triumph of American legal and social history." -- Back cover.

Dark Medicine

Rationalizing Unethical Medical Research

Author: William R. LaFleur,Gernot Böhme,Susumu Shimazono

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253220416

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 2042

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Where does one set the limits on research involving human subjects?

Three Generations, No Imbeciles

Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck v. Bell

Author: Paul A. Lombardo

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

ISBN: 9780801898242

Category: Medical

Page: 384

View: 6433

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Three Generations, No Imbeciles tracks the notorious case through its history, revealing that it remains a potent symbol of government control of reproduction and a troubling precedent for the human genome era.

The Hidden Brain

How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives

Author: Shankar Vedantam

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 9781588369390

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 1581

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The hidden brain is the voice in our ear when we make the most important decisions in our lives—but we’re never aware of it. The hidden brain decides whom we fall in love with and whom we hate. It tells us to vote for the white candidate and convict the dark-skinned defendant, to hire the thin woman but pay her less than the man doing the same job. It can direct us to safety when disaster strikes and move us to extraordinary acts of altruism. But it can also be manipulated to turn an ordinary person into a suicide terrorist or a group of bystanders into a mob. In a series of compulsively readable narratives, Shankar Vedantam journeys through the latest discoveries in neuroscience, psychology, and behavioral science to uncover the darkest corner of our minds and its decisive impact on the choices we make as individuals and as a society. Filled with fascinating characters, dramatic storytelling, and cutting-edge science, this is an engrossing exploration of the secrets our brains keep from us—and how they are revealed.

A Century of Eugenics in America

From the Indiana Experiment to the Human Genome Era

Author: Paul A. Lombardo

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253222699

Category: Medical

Page: 251

View: 4236

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In 1907, Indiana passed the world's first involuntary sterilization law based on the theory of eugenics. In time, more than 30 states and a dozen foreign countries followed suit. Although the Indiana statute was later declared unconstitutional, other laws restricting immigration and regulating marriage on "eugenic" grounds were still in effect in the U.S. as late as the 1970s. A Century of Eugenics in America assesses the history of eugenics in the United States and its status in the age of the Human Genome Project. The essays explore the early support of compulsory sterilization by doctors and legislators; the implementation of eugenic schemes in Indiana, Georgia, California, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Alabama; the legal and social challenges to sterilization; and the prospects for a eugenics movement basing its claims on modern genetic science.

Telling Genes

The Story of Genetic Counseling in America

Author: Alexandra Minna Stern

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421406675

Category: Medical

Page: 248

View: 8676

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For sixty years genetic counselors have served as the messengers of important information about the risks, realities, and perceptions of genetic conditions. More than 2,500 certified genetic counselors in the United States work in clinics, community and teaching hospitals, public health departments, private biotech companies, and universities. Telling Genes considers the purpose of genetic counseling for twenty-first century families and society and places the field into its historical context. Genetic counselors educate physicians, scientific researchers, and prospective parents about the role of genetics in inherited disease. They are responsible for reliably translating test results and technical data for a diverse clientele, using scientific acumen and human empathy to help people make informed decisions about genomic medicine. Alexandra Minna Stern traces the development of genetic counseling from the eugenics movement of the early twentieth century to the current era of human genomics. Drawing from archival records, patient files, and oral histories, Stern presents the fascinating story of the growth of genetic counseling practices, principles, and professionals. -- Troy Duster, Chancellor'

Illiberal Reformers

Race, Eugenics, and American Economics in the Progressive Era

Author: Thomas C. Leonard

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400874076

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 264

View: 6167

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In Illiberal Reformers, Thomas Leonard reexamines the economic progressives whose ideas and reform agenda underwrote the Progressive Era dismantling of laissez-faire and the creation of the regulatory welfare state, which, they believed, would humanize and rationalize industrial capitalism. But not for all. Academic social scientists such as Richard T. Ely, John R. Commons, and Edward A. Ross, together with their reform allies in social work, charity, journalism, and law, played a pivotal role in establishing minimum-wage and maximum-hours laws, workmen's compensation, antitrust regulation, and other hallmarks of the regulatory welfare state. But even as they offered uplift to some, economic progressives advocated exclusion for others, and did both in the name of progress. Leonard meticulously reconstructs the influence of Darwinism, racial science, and eugenics on scholars and activists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing a reform community deeply ambivalent about America's poor. Illiberal Reformers shows that the intellectual champions of the regulatory welfare state proposed using it not to help those they portrayed as hereditary inferiors but to exclude them.

The Kallikak Family

A Study in the Heredity of Feeble-mindedness

Author: Henry Herbert Goddard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Behavior genetics

Page: 121

View: 5104

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The Sterilization of Carrie Buck

Was She Feebleminded Or Society's Pawn

Author: J. David Smith,K. Ray Nelson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780882821924

Category: Law

Page: 268

View: 6088

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Though she had normal intelligence, Carrie Buck was labeled "feebleminded" because she was young, poor, female and powerless. Her child was taken away and she was sterilized. Her landmark Supreme Court case, which led to the sterilization of 50,000 Americans and was cited as the precedent for the Nazi race hygiene program, is still making headlines today.

City of Courts

Socializing Justice in Progressive Era Chicago

Author: Michael Willrich

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521794039

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 7109

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This 2003 book looks at contesting concepts of crime, and social justice in nineteenth-century industrial America.

American Eugenics

Race, Queer Anatomy, and the Science of Nationalism

Author: Nancy Ordover

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816635580

Category: Medical

Page: 297

View: 1846

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Traces the history of eugenics ideology in the United States and its ongoing presence in contemporary life. The Nazis may have given eugenics its negative connotations, but the practice--and the "science" that supports it--is still disturbingly alive in America in anti-immigration initiatives, the quest for a "gay gene, " and theories of collective intelligence. Tracing the historical roots and persistence of eugenics in the United States, Nancy Ordover explores the political and cultural climate that has endowed these campaigns with mass appeal and scientific legitimacy. American Eugenics demonstrates how biological theories of race, gender, and sexuality are crucially linked through a concern with regulating the "unfit." These links emerge in Ordover's examination of three separate but ultimately related American eugenics campaigns: early twentieth-century anti-immigration crusades; medical models and interventions imposed on (and sometimes embraced by) lesbians, gays, transgendered people, and bisexuals; and the compulsory sterilization of poor women and women of color. Throughout, her work reveals how constructed notions of race, gender, sexuality, and nation are put to ideological uses and how "faith in science" can undermine progressive social movements, drawing liberals and conservatives alike into eugenics-based discourse and policies.

Fixing the Poor

Eugenic Sterilization and Child Welfare in the Twentieth Century

Author: Molly Ladd-Taylor

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421423723

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3902

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Combining innovative political analysis with a compelling social history of those caught up in Minnesota’s welfare system, Fixing the Poor is a powerful reinterpretation of eugenic sterilization.

Managing White Supremacy

Race, Politics, and Citizenship in Jim Crow Virginia

Author: J. Douglas Smith

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807862266

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 4533

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Tracing the erosion of white elite paternalism in Jim Crow Virginia, Douglas Smith reveals a surprising fluidity in southern racial politics in the decades between World War I and the Supreme Court's 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision. Smith draws on official records, private correspondence, and letters to newspapers from otherwise anonymous Virginians to capture a wide and varied range of black and white voices. African Americans emerge as central characters in the narrative, as Smith chronicles their efforts to obtain access to public schools and libraries, protection under the law, and the equitable distribution of municipal resources. This acceleration of black resistance to white supremacy in the years before World War II precipitated a crisis of confidence among white Virginians, who, despite their overwhelming electoral dominance, felt increasingly insecure about their ability to manage the color line on their own terms. Exploring the everyday power struggles that accompanied the erosion of white authority in the political, economic, and educational arenas, Smith uncovers the seeds of white Virginians' resistance to civil rights activism in the second half of the twentieth century.

Better for All the World

The Secret History of Forced Sterilization and America's Quest for Racial Purity

Author: Harry Bruinius

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0375713050

Category: History

Page: 401

View: 5623

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Traces the history of eugenics in the United States, drawing on personal letters, diaries, and documents to chronicle the little-known quest for racial purity.

The Case Against the Supreme Court

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0143128000

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 8175

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Both historically and in the present, the Supreme Court has largely been a failure In this devastating book, Erwin Chemerinsky—“one of the shining lights of legal academia” (The New York Times)—shows how, case by case, for over two centuries, the hallowed Court has been far more likely to uphold government abuses of power than to stop them. Drawing on a wealth of rulings, some famous, others little known, he reviews the Supreme Court's historic failures in key areas, including the refusal to protect minorities, the upholding of gender discrimination, and the neglect of the Constitution in times of crisis, from World War I through 9/11. No one is better suited to make this case than Chemerinsky. He has studied, taught, and practiced constitutional law for thirty years and has argued before the Supreme Court. With passion and eloquence, Chemerinsky advocates reforms that could make the system work better, and he challenges us to think more critically about the nature of the Court and the fallible men and women who sit on it.

Eugenical Sterilization in the United States

Author: Harry Hamilton Laughlin

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 9781357633202

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9302

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Sex, Race, and Science

Eugenics in the Deep South

Author: Edward J. Larson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801855115

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 7970

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In the first book to explore the theory and practice of eugenics in the American South, Edward J. Larson shows how the quest for "strong bloodlines"expressed itself in state laws and public policies from the Progressive Era through World War II. Larson shows how the seemingly broad-based eugenics movement was in fact a series of distinct campaigns by small groups of determined individuals for legislation at the state level.

Licensed to Practice

The Supreme Court Defines the American Medical Profession

Author: James C. Mohr

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421411423

Category: Law

Page: 216

View: 9151

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Licensed to Practice begins with an 1891 shooting in Wheeling, West Virginia, that left one doctor dead and another on trial for his life. Formerly close friends, the doctors had fallen out over the issue of medical licensing. Historian James C. Mohr calls the murder "a sorry personal consequence of the far larger and historically significant battle among West Virginia’s physicians over the future of their profession." Through most of the nineteenth century, anyone could call themselves a doctor and could practice medicine on whatever basis they wished. But an 1889 U.S. Supreme Court case, Dent v. West Virginia, effectively transformed medical practice from an unregulated occupation to a legally recognized profession. The political and legal battles that led up to the decision were unusually bitter—especially among physicians themselves—and the outcome was far from a foregone conclusion. So-called Regular physicians wanted to impose their own standards on the wide-open medical marketplace in which they and such non-Regulars as Thomsonians, Botanics, Hydropaths, Homeopaths, and Eclectics competed. The Regulars achieved their goal by persuading the state legislature to make it a crime for anyone to practice without a license from the Board of Health, which they controlled. When the high court approved that arrangement—despite constitutional challenges—the licensing precedents established in West Virginia became the bedrock on which the modern American medical structure was built. And those precedents would have profound implications. Thus does Dent, a little-known Supreme Court case, influence how Americans receive health care more than a hundred years after the fact.