Through the Lens of Anthropology

An Introduction to Human Evolution and Culture

Author: Robert J. Muckle,Laura Tubelle de González

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442608633

Category: Social Science

Page: 420

View: 5634

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Through the Lens of Anthropology

An Introduction to Human Evolution and Culture

Author: Robert J. Muckle,Laura Tubelle de González

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442608668

Category: Social Science

Page: 420

View: 8558

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Through the Lens of Anthropology is a concise but comprehensive introductory textbook that uses the twin themes of food and sustainability to illustrate the connected nature of anthropology's four major subfields: archaeology, and biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology. By viewing the world through the lens of anthropology, students will learn not only about anthropological methods, theories, and ethics, but also the ways in which anthropology is relevant to their everyday lives and embedded in the culture that surrounds them. Beautifully illustrated throughout, with over 150 full-color images, figures, feature boxes, and maps, this is an anthropology text with a fresh perspective, a lively narrative, and plenty of popular topics that are sure to engage readers. A strong pedagogical framework structures the book: each chapter features learning objectives, glossary terms, and chapter summaries, as well as review and discussion questions which guide students' analysis of the topics, themes, and issues raised in the text. This book is interesting to read, manageable to teach, and succeeds at igniting interest in anthropology as a discipline.

Through the Lens of Anthropology

Author: Laura Tubelle de González,Robert Muckle

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781487587819

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 6745

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Through the Lens of Anthropology is a concise introduction to anthropology that uses the twin themes of food and sustainability to illustrate the connected nature of the discipline's many subfields. Beautifully illustrated throughout, with over 150 full-color images, figures, feature boxes, and maps, this is an anthropology book with a fresh perspective, a lively narrative, and plenty of popular topics. The new edition enhances the food and sustainability focus and builds a stronger narrative voice with extended examples and case studies. An entirely new section on decolonization, more Indigenous content, and updated material on biological anthropology make the second edition even more relevant for those interested in learning more about the discipline of anthropology.

Around the World in 30 Years

Life as a Cultural Anthropologist

Author: Barbara Gallatin Anderson

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 1478607726

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 5988

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Ten cultures! Barbara Gallatin Anderson brings to life a range of cultures from the tribal Hmong to a United States military base. With humor and a precision born of hands-on familiarity with the regions involved, she draws the reader into startlingly real identification with other peoples worlds: France, Denmark, Thailand, India, Morocco, Japan, Corsica, China, Russia, and the United States. Every chapter gives us insight into the ways we identify with basic anthropological themes, the challenges of applied fieldwork, and the impact of change. To a surprising extent the reader becomes the anthropologistwith all the highs and lows that are part of life as a cultural anthropologist.

Meeting the Family

One Man's Journey Through His Human Ancestry

Author: Donovan Webster

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 1426206046

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 2840

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Donovan Webster brings his vivid journalistic gifts to a new subject, tracing our deep genealogy using cutting-edge DNA research to map our eons-old journey from prehistoric Africa into the modern world. With the same genetic haplotype as many white American males, Webster makes an ideal subject—he is a genuine Everyman. While his voice and spirit are unique to him, in exploring his own ancestry, he shows us our own. Drawing on National Geographic’s Genographic Project, the largest anthropologic DNA study of its kind, Webster traces centuries of migrations, everywhere finding members of his now far-flung genetic family. In Tanzania’s Rift Valley, he hunts with Julius, whose tribe speaks a click language, and wanders the ruins of ancient Mesopotamia with Mohamed and Khalid, now Jordanian citizens. In Samarkand, Uzbekistan, eastern frontier of his ancestral roaming, a circus ringmaster becomes both friend and link to his primal bloodline. Webster’s genographic quest leads him to contemplate what traits he shares with those he meets, and considers what they and their ways of life reveal about the deep history of our species. A lifetime of journalistic travels among a wide range of cultures furnish Webster with a wealth of colorful threads to weave into a story as particularly personal as it is universally human.

How to Think Like an Anthropologist

Author: Matthew Engelke

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400889529

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 7704

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From an award-winning anthropologist, a lively accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to the subject What is anthropology? What can it tell us about the world? Why, in short, does it matter? For well over a century, cultural anthropologists have circled the globe, from Papua New Guinea to suburban England and from China to California, uncovering surprising facts and insights about how humans organize their lives and articulate their values. In the process, anthropology has done more than any other discipline to reveal what culture means--and why it matters. By weaving together examples and theories from around the world, Matthew Engelke provides a lively, accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to anthropology, covering a wide range of classic and contemporary approaches, subjects, and practitioners. Presenting a set of memorable cases, he encourages readers to think deeply about some of the key concepts with which anthropology tries to make sense of the world—from culture and nature to authority and blood. Along the way, he shows why anthropology matters: not only because it helps us understand other cultures and points of view but also because, in the process, it reveals something about ourselves and our own cultures, too.

Anthropology of Infectious Disease

Author: Merrill Singer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315434717

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 820

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This book synthesizes the flourishing field of anthropology of infectious disease in a critical, biocultural framework. Leading medical anthropologist Merrill Singer holistically unites the behaviors of microorganisms and the activities of complex social systems, showing how we exist with pathogenic agents of disease in a complex process of co-evolution. He also connects human diseases to larger ecosystems and various other species that are future sources of new human infections. Anthropology of Infectious Disease integrates and advances research in this growing, multifaceted area and offers an ideal supplement to courses in anthropology, public health, development studies, and related fields.

Blood Relations

Menstruation and the Origins of Culture

Author: Chris Knight

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030018655X

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 592

View: 7139

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The emergence of symbolic culture is generally linked with the development of the hunger-gatherer adaptation based on a sexual division of labor. This original and ingenious book presents a new theory of how this symbolic domain originated. Integrating perspectives of evolutionary biography and social anthropology within a Marxist framework, Chris Knight rejects the common assumption that human culture was a modified extension of primate behavior and argues instead that it was the product of an immense social, sexual, and political revolution initiated by women. Culture became established, says Knight, when evolving human females began to assert collective control over their own sexuality, refusing sex to all males except those who came to them with provisions. Women usually timed their ban on sexual relations with their periods of infertility while they were menstruating, and to the extent that their solidarity drew women together, these periods tended to occur in synchrony. The result was that every month with the onset of menstruation, sexual relations were ruptured in a collective, ritualistic way as the prelude to each successful hunting expedition. This ritual act was the means through which women motivated men not only to hunt but also to concentrate energies on bringing back the meat. Knight shows how this hypothesis sheds light on the roots of such cultural traditions as totemic rituals, incest and menstrual taboos, blood-sacrifice, and hunters’ atonement rites. Providing detailed ethnographic documentation, he also explains how Native American, Australian Aboriginal, and other magico-religious myths can be read as derivatives of the same symbolic logic.

Introducing Archaeology

Second Edition

Author: Robert J. Muckle

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442607858

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6809

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The second edition highlights recent developments in the field and includes a new chapter on archaeology beyond mainstream academia. It also integrates more examples from popular culture, including mummies, tattoos, pirates, and global warming.

Men

Evolutionary and Life History

Author: Richard G. BRIBIESCAS

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674028783

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 1117

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Males account for roughly 50 percent of the global population, but in America and other places, they account for over 85 percent of violent crime. A graph of relative risk of death in human males shows that mortality is high immediately following birth, falls during childhood, then exhibits a distinct rise between the ages of 15 and 35--primarily the result of accidents, violence, and risky behaviors. Why? What compels males to drive fast, act violently, and behave stupidly? Why are men's lives so different from those of women? Men presents a new approach to understanding the human male by drawing upon life history and evolutionary theory. Because life history theory focuses on the timing of, and energetic investment in, particular aspects of physiology, such as growth and reproduction, Richard Bribiescas and his fellow anthropologists are now using it in the study of humans. This has led to an increased understanding of human female physiology--especially growth and reproduction--from an evolutionary and life history perspective. However, little attention has been directed toward these characteristics in males. Men provides a new understanding of human male physiology and applies it to contemporary health issues such as prostate cancer, testosterone replacement therapy, and the development of a male contraceptive. Men proves that understanding human physiology requires global research in traditionally overlooked areas and that evolutionary and life history theory have much to offer toward this endeavor.

Emigrating Beyond Earth

Human Adaptation and Space Colonization

Author: Cameron Smith,Evan T. Davies

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461411653

Category: Science

Page: 290

View: 8526

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Emigrating Beyond Earth puts space colonization into the context of human evolution. Rather than focusing on the technologies and strategies needed to colonize space, the authors examine the human and societal reasons for space colonization. They make space colonization seems like a natural step by demonstrating that if will continue the human species' 4 million-year-old legacy of adaptation to difficult new environments. The authors present many examples from the history of human expansion into new environments, including two amazing tales of human colonization - the prehistoric settlement of the upper Arctic around 5,000 years ago and the colonization of the Pacific islands around 3,000 years ago - which show that space exploration is no more about rockets and robots that Arctic exploration was about boating!

Humanity: An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Author: James Peoples,Garrick Bailey

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1337515809

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 4859

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HUMANITY: AN INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Eleventh Edition, offers a solid framework centered on globalization and culture change. The text's engaging narrative provides new ways of looking at many of the challenges facing the world in this century, as students examine ethnic conflicts, globalization of culture and language, recent debates about gay marriage, increasing inequalities, population growth, hunger, and the survival of indigenous cultures. Throughout this highly acclaimed work, Peoples and Bailey explore the diversity of humanity and clearly demonstrate why an appreciation and tolerance of cultural differences is critical today. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Anthropological Lens

Harsh Light, Soft Focus

Author: James L. Peacock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521004596

Category: Social Science

Page: 156

View: 6011

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A revised version covers new topics and reflects recent changes in perspective and language.

Race, Monogamy, and Other Lies They Told You

Busting Myths about Human Nature

Author: Agustín Fuentes

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520285999

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 9999

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There are three major myths of human nature: humans are divided into biological races; humans are naturally aggressive; and men and women are truly different in behavior, desires, and wiring. In an engaging and wide-ranging narrative, Agustín Fuentes counters these pervasive and pernicious myths about human behavior. Tackling misconceptions about what race, aggression, and sex really mean for humans, Fuentes incorporates an accessible understanding of culture, genetics, and evolution, requiring us to dispose of notions of “nature or nurture.” Presenting scientific evidence from diverse fields—including anthropology, biology, and psychology—Fuentes devises a myth-busting toolkit to dismantle persistent fallacies about the validity of biological races, the innateness of aggression and violence, and the nature of monogamy and differences between the sexes. A final chapter plus an appendix provide a set of take-home points on how readers can myth-bust on their own. Accessible, compelling, and original, this book is a rich and nuanced account of how nature, culture, experience, and choice interact to influence human behavior.

On the Origin of Tepees

The Evolution of Ideas (and Ourselves)

Author: Jonnie Hughes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439110247

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 7992

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We humans pride ourselves on our capacity to have ideas, but perhaps this pride is misplaced. Perhaps ideas have us. After all, ideas do appear to have a life of their own. Many biologists have already come to the opinion that our genes are selfish entities, tricking us into helping them to reproduce. Is it the same with our ideas? Jonnie Hughes, a science writer and documentary filmmaker, investigates the evolution of ideas in order to find out. Adopting the role of a cultural Charles Darwin, Hughes heads off, with his brother in tow, across the Midwest to observe firsthand the natural history of ideas--the patterns of their variation, inheritance, and selection in the cultural landscape. In place of Darwin's oceanic islands, Hughes visits the "mind islands" of Native American tribes. Instead of finches, Hughes searches for signs of natural selection among the tepees.--From publisher description.

Masters of the Planet

The Search for Our Human Origins

Author: Ian Tattersall

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 023010875X

Category: Science

Page: 266

View: 2117

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An award-winning Museum of Natural History curator and author of Becoming Human traces the evolution of homo sapiens to demonstrate how they prevailed among other early humans because of their unique cognitive ability, in an account that also explains how their superior mental abilities were acquired. 40,000 first printing.

The Origin of Mind

Evolution of Brain, Cognition, and General Intelligence

Author: David C. Geary

Publisher: Amer Psychological Assn

ISBN: 9781591471813

Category: Medical

Page: 459

View: 8896

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"Geary also explores a number of issues that are of interest in modern society, including how general intelligence relates to academic achievement, occupational status, and income."--BOOK JACKET.

Evolution and Human Behaviour

Darwinian Perspectives on the Human Condition

Author: John Cartwright

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137348011

Category: Science

Page: 520

View: 837

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This comprehensive book offers a compelling synthesis of key ideas and concepts, and addresses in fundamental evolutionary terms the way humans think, feel and behave. This revised, updated and expanded edition includes new material on epigenetics, life history and error management theories, homosexuality, disease and gene-culture co-evolution.

The Interpretation of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 4411

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In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.