Troublesome Border

Author: Oscar J‡quez Mart’nez

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816525577

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 182

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ÒU.S. residents are largely unaware that Mexicans also view their northern border with concern, and at times even alarm. Border communities, such as Ciudad Ju‡rez and Tijuana, have long been subjected to heavy criticism from Mexico City and other interior areas for their close ties to the United States, a country viewed with apprehension and suspicion by the Mexican citizenry.Ó Oscar Mart’nezÕs words may come as a surprise to those who associate the U.S. southern border with banditry, racial strife, illegal migration, drug smuggling, and official corruptionÑall attributed to Mexico. In Troublesome Border, now revised to reflect the dramatic changes over the last two decades, a distinguished scholar and long-time resident of the border area addresses these and other problems that have caused increasing concern to federal governments on both sides of the border. This second edition of Troublesome Border has been updated and revised to cover dramatic developments since the bookÕs first publication in 1988 that have once again transformed the region in fundamental ways. Martinez includes new information on migration and drugs, including the extraordinary rise of violence traced largely to the rampant illegal drug trade; the devastating effects of U.S. Border Patrol ÒblockadesÓ that have resulted in thousands of deaths; and the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Author: Oscar Jáquez Martínez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780842024471

Category: History

Page: 264

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"Excellent collection of scholarly essays and primary documents. Covers 1830s-1990s, with the emphasis on the post-1910 era. Work is divided into seven sections, each covering a key issue in borderlands history. Good introduction to each entry"--Handbookof Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Border People

Life and Society in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Author: Oscar J‡quez Mart’nez

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816514144

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5864

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Looks at life on the Mexican border, including the ethnicity, attitudes, and place of residence of those who live there, and how they interact with other residents

The Three U.S.-Mexico Border Wars: Drugs, Immigration, and Homeland Security, 2nd Edition

Drugs, Immigration, and Homeland Security

Author: Tony Payan

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 144083542X

Category: Political Science

Page: 255

View: 7165

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This book addresses the three central issues that continue to dominate the U.S.-Mexico relationship today: drugs, immigration, and security. Nowhere is this more palpable than at the 2,000-mile border shared by the two countries. • Provides a historical perspective that is necessary to understand today's border conflicts • Includes new coverage of weapons trafficking, human trafficking, the diversified activities of organized crime, the role of drug consumption in America, the decay of the border infrastructure, the militarization of the border, and the effects of Arizona's immigration policy changes • Challenges current views about the border as unsafe, unstable, crime-riddled, and a burden on the nation • Portrays the border as a place of hope in need of better management rather than reinforcement of the security regime that has prevailed in the last decades • Includes a chapter on the Peña government and its effect on the binational relationship, the war on the Cartels, and escalation of violence • Draws on the author's current research and interviews with new government actors • Offers penetrating analysis and sound policy recommendations, particularly on how to achieve a truly binational border management system • Features a new final chapter that projects the future of the border over the next 25 years

Beyond Borders

A History of Mexican Migration to the United States

Author: Timothy J. Henderson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444394955

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 2914

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Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States details the origins and evolution of the movement of people from Mexico into the United States from the first significant flow across the border at the turn of the twentieth century up to the present day. Considers the issues from the perspectives of both the United States and Mexico Offers a reasoned assessment of the factors that drive Mexican immigration, explains why so many of the policies enacted in Washington have only worsened the problem, and suggests what policy options might prove more effective Argues that the problem of Mexican immigration can only be solved if Mexico and the United States work together to reduce the disequilibrium that propels Mexican immigrants to the United States

Mexico's Uneven Development

The Geographical and Historical Context of Inequality

Author: Oscar J. Martinez

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317555635

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 7381

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Mexico and the United States may be neighbors, but their economies offer stark contrasts. In Mexico’s Uneven Development: The Geographical and Historical Context of Inequality, Oscar J. Martínez explores Mexico’s history to explain why Mexico remains less developed than the United States. Weaving in stories from his own experiences growing up along the U.S.-Mexico border, Martínez shows how the foundational factors of external relations, the natural environment, the structures of production and governance, natural resources, and population dynamics have all played roles in shaping the Mexican economy. This interesting and thought-provoking study clearly and convincingly explains the issues that affect Mexico's underdevelopment. It will prove invaluable to anyone studying Mexico’s past or interested in its future.

The Shadow of the Wall

Violence and Migration on the U.S.-Mexico Border

Author: Jeremy Slack,Daniel E. Martínez,Scott Whiteford

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816535590

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 4923

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Mass deportation is currently at the forefront of political discourse in the United States. This volume allows readers to understand the very real impact that mass removal to Mexico has on people's lives. The Shadow of the Wall underscores the unintended social consequences of increased border enforcement, immigrant criminalization, and deportation along the U.S.-Mexico border.

El Narcotraficante

Narcocorridos and the Construction of a Cultural Persona on the U.S.–Mexico Border

Author: Mark Cameron Edberg

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292702066

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 7608

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Since the late 1970s, a new folk hero has risen to prominence in the U.S.-Mexico border region and beyond—the narcotrafficker. Celebrated in the narcocorrido, a current form of the traditional border song known as the corrido, narcotraffickers are often portrayed as larger-than-life "social bandits" who rise from poor or marginalized backgrounds to positions of power and wealth by operating outside the law and by living a life of excess, challenging authority (whether U.S. or Mexican), and flouting all risks, including death. This image, rooted in Mexican history, has been transformed and commodified by the music industry and by the drug trafficking industry itself into a potent and highly marketable product that has a broad appeal, particularly among those experiencing poverty and power disparities. At the same time, the transformation from folk hero to marketable product raises serious questions about characterizations of narcocorridos as "narratives of resistance." This multilayered ethnography takes a wide-ranging look at the persona of the narcotrafficker and how it has been shaped by Mexican border culture, socioeconomic and power disparities, and the transnational music industry. Mark Edberg begins by analyzing how the narcocorrido emerged from and relates to the traditional corrido and its folk hero. Then, drawing upon interviews and participant-observation with corrido listening audiences in the border zone, as well as musicians and industry producers of narcocorridos, he elucidates how the persona of the narcotrafficker has been created, commodified, and enacted, and why this character resonates so strongly with people who are excluded from traditional power structures. Finally, he takes a look at the concept of the cultural persona itself and its role as both cultural representation and model for practice.

Faces of Latin America

Fourth Edition (Revised)

Author: Duncan Green,Sue Branford

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1583673245

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9686

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Faces of Latin America has sold more than 50,000 copies since it first appeared in 1991, and is widely considered to be the best available introduction in English to the economies, politics, demography, social structures, environment and cultures of Latin America. Duncan Green and Sue Branford take the reader beyond the conventional media’s fixation on the drug trade, corrupt politicians and military leaders, death squads, and guerrilla movements to celebrate the vibrant history and culture of Latin America’s people. Faces of Latin America examines some of the key forces—from conquest and the growth of the commodity trade, military rule, land distribution, industrialization, and migration to civil wars and revolutions, the debt crisis, neoliberalism, and NAFTA—shaping the region’s political and social history. Green also analyzes the response to these transformations—the rise of freedom fighters and populists, guerrilla wars and grassroots social movements, union organizing and trade movements, liberation theology, and the women’s movement, sustainable development and the fight for the rainforest, popular culture and the mass media—providing a fascinating and unparalleled portrait of the continent. This new edition is thoroughly updated and covers recent developments in Latin America such as the growing costs of export agriculture, the rise of Brazilian manufacturing, connections between the war on drugs and the war on terror, the social costs of neoliberalism, the Argentinian default, the search for new economic models in Venezuela and elsewhere, the decline in direct U.S. military intervention in the region, growing urbanization, urban poverty and casual employment, outmigration and the importance of family remittances from abroad, rampant environmental destruction, the struggles of indigenous movements, and more.

"I Know It's Dangerous"

Why Mexicans Risk Their Lives to Cross the Border

Author: Lynnaire Maria Sheridan

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816528578

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 2335

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Recounts the experiences of Mexicans who have risked their lives to cross the Mexico-America border, explaining how the thrill of taking that risk has become a motivator for border crossers.

Fugitive Landscapes

The Forgotten History of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Author: Samuel Truett

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300135329

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 3008

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Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest StudiesIn the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Mexicans and Americans joined together to transform the U.S.–Mexico borderlands into a crossroads of modern economic development. This book reveals the forgotten story of their ambitious dreams and their ultimate failure to control this fugitive terrain. Focusing on a mining region that spilled across the Arizona–Sonora border, this book shows how entrepreneurs, corporations, and statesmen tried to domesticate nature and society within a transnational context. Efforts to tame a “wild” frontier were stymied by labor struggles, social conflict, and revolution. Fugitive Landscapes explores the making and unmaking of the U.S.–Mexico border, telling how ordinary people resisted the domination of empires, nations, and corporations to shape transnational history on their own terms. By moving beyond traditional national narratives, it offers new lessons for our own border-crossing age.

Border Boom Town

Ciudad Juárez since 1848

Author: Oscar J. Martinez

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292729827

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 6869

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Border Boom Town traces the social and economic evolution of Ciudad Juárez, the largest city on the U.S.-Mexican border and one of the fastest-growing urban centers in the world. In this evocative portrait, Oscar J. Martínez stresses the interdependence of Juárez and El Paso, a condition that is similar to relations between other "twin cities" along the border. Using a wide variety of local historical materials from both sides of the Río Grande, Martínez shows how Juárez entered the modern era with the arrival of the railroads in the 1880's, serving as a principal port of exit for waves of Mexican emigrants bound for the United States. In more recent years, increased migration to the area has resulted in extraordinary expansion of the population, with significant impact on both sides of the boundary. Proximity to the highly industrialized country to the north and remoteness from Mexico's centers of production have brought a multiplicity of assets and liabilities. Juárez's vulnerability to external conditions has led to alternating cycles of prosperity and depression since the establishment of the border in 1848. With the stimulus of new development programs in the 1960's and 1970's designed to integrate this neglected area into the national economic network, Juárez enjoyed the biggest boom in its history. However, government efforts to improve socioeconomic conditions failed to solve old problems and gave rise to new social ills. Ironically, the "Mexicanization" campaign on the border has led to unprecedented levels of foreign dependency. Martínez's analysis shows that integrating the northern Mexican frontier into the national economy remains an elusive and complex problem with which Mexico will continue to grapple for years to come. Border Boom Town traces the social and economic evolution of Ciudad Juárez, the largest city on the U.S.-Mexican border and one of the fastest-growing urban centers in the world. In this evocative portrait, Oscar J. Martínez stresses the interdependence of Juárez and El Paso, a condition that is similar to relations between other "twin cities" along the border. Using a wide variety of local historical materials from both sides of the Río Grande, Martínez shows how Juárez entered the modern era with the arrival of the railroads in the 1880's, serving as a principal port of exit for waves of Mexican emigrants bound for the United States. In more recent years, increased migration to the area has resulted in extraordinary expansion of the population, with significant impact on both sides of the boundary. Proximity to the highly industrialized country to the north and remoteness from Mexico's centers of production have brought a multiplicity of assets and liabilities. Juárez's vulnerability to external conditions has led to alternating cycles of prosperity and depression since the establishment of the border in 1848. With the stimulus of new development programs in the 1960's and 1970's designed to integrate this neglected area into the national economic network, Juárez enjoyed the biggest boom in its history. However, government efforts to improve socioeconomic conditions failed to solve old problems and gave rise to new social ills. Ironically, the "Mexicanization" campaign on the border has led to unprecedented levels of foreign dependency.Martínez's analysis shows that integrating the northern Mexican frontier into the national economy remains an elusive and complex problem with which Mexico will continue to grapple for years to come.

The U.S.-Mexico Transborder Region

Cultural Dynamics and Historical Interactions

Author: Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez,Josiah Heyman

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816535159

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 4196

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"One of the most complete collections of essays on U.S.-Mexico border studies"--Provided by publisher.

Stunted Dreams

How the United States Shaped Mexico's Destiny

Author: Oscar J. Martinez

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780692909317

Category: Mexican-American Border Region

Page: 32

View: 1433

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This booklet explores the role of Mexico's interaction with the United States and assesses the impact of geography on shaping the destiny of the Mexican people. Historically the United States has exerted overwhelming influence over the way that Mexico has developed economically. Most importantly, in the mid-nineteenth century the United States undermined Mexico's long-term development by dispossessing its neighbor of its most valuable lands, imposing a border that has heavily favored U.S. interests, and paving the way for the dominant U.S. economy to compete more closely and more directly with the much weaker Mexican economy. As a result of these events, Mexicans have had to struggle to build their country under the shadow of the powerful United States, not unlike small retailers who try to survive in the face of crushing competition from a Wal-Mart megastore located uncomfortably nearby.

Ringside Seat to a Revolution

An Underground Cultural History of El Paso and Juárez, 1893-1923

Author: David Romo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780938317913

Category: Education

Page: 293

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Visionary essays and images from the crucible of the Mexican Revolution.

Where the Water Goes

Life and Death Along the Colorado River

Author: David Owen

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698189906

Category: Science

Page: 288

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An eye-opening account of where our water comes from and where it all goes. The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from the Colorado’s headwaters to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. He takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and RV parks, to the spot near the U.S.–Mexico border where the river runs dry. Water problems in the western United States can seem tantalizingly easy to solve: just turn off the fountains at the Bellagio, stop selling hay to China, ban golf, cut down the almond trees, and kill all the lawyers. But a closer look reveals a vast man-made ecosystem that is far more complex and more interesting than the headlines let on. The story Owen tells in Where the Water Goes is crucial to our future: how a patchwork of engineering marvels, byzantine legal agreements, aging infrastructure, and neighborly cooperation enables life to flourish in the desert —and the disastrous consequences we face when any part of this tenuous system fails.

Gardening for a Lifetime

How to Garden Wiser as You Grow Older

Author: Sydney Eddison

Publisher: Timber Press

ISBN: 1604692529

Category: Gardening

Page: 208

View: 9760

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From the winner of the National Garden Club's Award of Excellence Although the garden may beckon as strongly as ever, the tasks involved—pulling weeds, pushing wheelbarrows, digging holes, moving heavy pots—become increasingly difficult, or even impossible, with advancing age. But the idea of giving it up is unthinkable for most gardeners. So what’s the alternative? In Gardening for a Lifetime, Sydney Eddison draws on her own forty years of gardening to provide a practical and encouraging roadmap for scaling back while keeping up with the gardening activities that each gardener loves most. Like replacing demanding plants like delphiniums with sturdy, relatively carefree perennials like sedums, rudbeckias, and daylilies. Or taking the leap and hiring help—another pair of hands, even for a few hours a week, goes a long way toward getting a big job done. This new edition features an additional chapter describing how Sydney’s struggles with hip and back problems forced her to walk the walk. As a friend of hers says, “Last summer you wrote the book. Now, I’m happy to see that you’ve read it.” Gentle, personable, and practical, Gardening for a Lifetime will be welcomed by all gardeners looking to transform gardening from a list of daunting chores into the gratifying, joyful activity it was meant to be.

Orozco

The Life and Death of a Mexican Revolutionary

Author: Raymond Caballero

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806159537

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 9940

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On August 31, 1915, a Texas posse lynched five “horse thieves.” One of them, it turned out, was General Pascual Orozco Jr., military hero of the Mexican Revolution. Was he a desperado or a hero? Orozco’s death proved as controversial as his storied life, a career of mysterious contradictions that Raymond Caballero puzzles out in this book. A long-overdue biography of a significant but little-known and less understood figure of Mexican history, Orozco tells the full story of this revolutionary’s meteoric rise and ignominious descent, including the purposely obscured circumstances of his death at the hands of a lone, murderous lawman. That story—of an unknown muleteer of Northwest Chihuahua who became the revolution’s most important military leader, a national hero and idol, only to turn on his former revolutionary ally Francisco Madero—is one of the most compelling narratives of early-twentieth-century Mexican history. Without Orozco’s leadership, Madero would likely have never deposed dictator Porfirio Díaz. And yet Orozco soon joined Madero’s hated assassin, the new dictator, Victoriano Huerta, and espoused progressive reforms while fighting on behalf of reactionaries. Whereas other historians have struggled to make sense of this contradictory record, Caballero brings to light Orozco’s bizarre appointment of an unknown con man to administer his rebellion, a man whose background and character, once revealed, explain many of Orozco’s previously baffling actions. The book also delves into the peculiar history of Orozco’s homeland, offering new insight into why Northwest Chihuahua, of all places in Mexico, produced the revolution’s military leadership, in particular a champion like Pascual Orozco. From the circumstances of his ascent, to revelations about his treachery, to the true details of his death, Orozco at last emerges, through Caballero’s account, in all his complexity and significance.

Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power

Race and the Intimate in Colonial Rule

Author: Ann Laura Stoler

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520231104

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 697

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"To my knowledge, there simply is no one else writing on questions of colonialism, gender, race, and intimacy who brings this depth and reach of historical and anthropological illumination to bear."—Nancy F. Cott, author of Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation "This new book brings our collective agenda forward with a degree of maturity and flexibility that makes narrow academic preferences both unnecessary and misleading."—Doris Sommer, author of Proceed with Caution, When Engaged by Minority Writing in the Americas

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

Author: Mo Willems

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781406386073

Category:

Page: 40

View: 780

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When a bus driver takes a break in this hilarious Caldecott Honor-winning picture book, he gives the reader just one instruction: "Don't let the pigeon drive the bus!" But, boy, that pigeon tries every trick in the book to get in that driving seat: he whines, wheedles, fibs and flatters. Will you let him drive? Told entirely in speech bubbles, this brilliantly original and funny picture book demands audience participation!