Fair & Balanced

A History of Journalistic Objectivity

Author: Steven R. Knowlton,Karen L. Freeman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781885219282

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 246

View: 1870

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A history of objectivity in journalism in the United States from 1650 to the present.

Objectivity in Journalism

Author: Steven Maras

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745663923

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 248

View: 3755

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Objectivity in journalism is a key topic for debate in media, communication and journalism studies, and has been the subject of intensive historical and sociological research. In the first study of its kind, Steven Maras surveys the different viewpoints and perspectives on objectivity. Going beyond a denunciation or defence of journalistic objectivity, Maras critically examines the different scholarly and professional arguments made in the area. Structured around key questions, the book considers the origins and history of objectivity, its philosophical influences, the main objections and defences, and questions of values, politics and ethics. This book examines debates around objectivity as a transnational norm, focusing on the emergence of objectivity in the US, while broadening out discussion to include developments around objectivity in the UK, Australia, Asia and other regions.

Historical Dictionary of Journalism

Author: Ross Eaman

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810862890

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 6701

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Journalism is the discipline of gathering, writing, and reporting news, and it includes the process of editing and presenting news articles. Journalism applies to various media, including but not limited to newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and the internet. The word 'journalist' started to become common in the early 18th century to designate a new kind of writer, about a century before 'journalism' made its appearance to describe what those writers produced. Though varying in form from one age and society to another, it gradually distinguished itself from other forms of writing through its focus on the present, its eye-witness perspective, and its reliance on everyday language. The Historical Dictionary of Journalism relates how journalism has evolved over the centuries. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on the different styles of journalism, the different types of media, and important writers and editors.

Media Bias

Finding It, Fixing It

Author: Jenn Burleson Mackay

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786455055

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 264

View: 9330

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In this book, scholars examine the many prevailing arguments about media bias from a non-polemical perspective. Essays cover individual forms of bias, including ideology, politics, television, photography, religion, abortion, homosexuality, gender, race, crime, environment, region, military, corporate ownership, labor and health. Each essay introduces the topic, presents arguments for and against the specific bias, assesses the evidence for all arguments, and includes a list of suggested readings. Two additional essays discuss the broader aspects of the bias debate and give a personal perspective on reporting the controversial Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Encyclopedia of American Journalism

Author: Stephen L. Vaughn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135880190

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 664

View: 2076

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The Encyclopedia of American Journalism explores the distinctions found in print media, radio, television, and the internet. This work seeks to document the role of these different forms of journalism in the formation of America's understanding and reaction to political campaigns, war, peace, protest, slavery, consumer rights, civil rights, immigration, unionism, feminism, environmentalism, globalization, and more. This work also explores the intersections between journalism and other phenomena in American Society, such as law, crime, business, and consumption. The evolution of journalism's ethical standards is discussed, as well as the important libel and defamation trials that have influenced journalistic practice, its legal protection, and legal responsibilities. Topics covered include: Associations and Organizations; Historical Overview and Practice; Individuals; Journalism in American History; Laws, Acts, and Legislation; Print, Broadcast, Newsgroups, and Corporations; Technologies.

Moral Reasoning for Journalists

Author: Steven R. Knowlton,Bill Reader

Publisher: Praeger Trade

ISBN: 9780313345500

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 243

View: 3578

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This book, which is written primarily for the working (or soon-to-be-working) journalist, serves as an introduction to the underpinnings of journalism ethics, and as a guide for journalists and journalism teachers who are looking for ways to make ethical choices beyond "going with your gut."

Just the Facts

How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Author: David T.Z. Mindich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764150

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 200

View: 2005

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If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.

Documentary

The Margins of Reality

Author: Paul Ward

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231850093

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 144

View: 8472

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In using case studies such as Touching the Void (2003) and the films of Nick Broomfield, this timely introduction to the growing field of documentary explores the definition and understanding of the form, as well as the relationship between documentary and drama, specifically the notion of reconstruction and reenactment. Paul Ward also discusses animated documentaries, the fertile genre of comedy, and feature-length contemporary works that have achieved widespread cinematic release.

Partisan Journalism

A History of Media Bias in the United States

Author: Jim A. Kuypers

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442225947

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 306

View: 4102

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In Partisan Journalism: A History of Media Bias in the United States, Jim A. Kuypers guides readers on a journey through American journalistic history, focusing on the warring notions of objectivity and partisanship. Kuypers shows how the American journalistic tradition grew from partisan roots and, with only a brief period of objectivity in between, has returned to those roots today. The book begins with an overview of newspapers during Colonial times, explaining how those papers openly operated in an expressly partisan way; he then moves through the Jacksonian era’s expansion of both the press and its partisan nature. After detailing the role of the press during the War Between the States, Kuypers demonstrates that it was the telegraph, not professional sentiment, that kicked off the movement toward objective news reporting. The conflict between partisanship and professionalization/objectivity continued through the muckraking years and through World War II, with newspapers in the 1950s often being objective in their reporting even as their editorials leaned to the right. This changed rapidly in the 1960s when newspaper editorials shifted from right to left, and progressive advocacy began to slowly erode objective content. Kuypers follows this trend through the early 1980s, and then turns his attention to demonstrating how new communication technologies have changed the very nature of news writing and delivery. In the final chapters covering the Bush and Obama presidencies, he traces the growth of the progressive and partisan nature of the mainstream news, while at the same time explores the rapid rise of alternative news sources, some partisan, some objective, that are challenging the dominance of the mainstream press. This book steps beyond a simple charge-counter-charge of political bias in the news in that it offers an argument that the press in America, except for a brief period, was essentially partisan from its inception and has returned with a vengeance to its original roots. The final argument presented in the book is that this new development may actually be healthy for American Democracy.

Voice of America

A History

Author: Alan L. Heil

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231126748

Category: History

Page: 538

View: 5380

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For more than sixty years the Voice of America has served as the nations largest publicly funded overseas broadcasting network. This is an "insiders story, " reflecting the transformation of VOA from a propaganda organ to a respected source of information.