Honest Sins

Georgian Libertinism and the Plays and Novels of Henry Fielding

Author: Tiffany Potter

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773518032

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 1329

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The good-natured Georgian libertinism that emerged maintained the subversive social, religious, sexual, and philosophical tenets of the old libertinism, but misogynist brutality was replaced by freedom and autonomy for the individual, whether male or female.

Suicide...the Unpardonable Sin?

Author: V. L. Wilson

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1434375803

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 64

View: 8366

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Early in the last century a boy, Ivy Flowers, swam across Tar Bay to Hoopers Island to see a girl. In time, Shirley Flowers was born of the union that began with that swim. During the same period, Captain Augustus Elsworth Phillips, Jr. was the captain of the cargo schooner, McCready. In her aft-cabin a boy, Brice Phillips would be conceived. Brice Phillips and Shirley Flowers would marry and have two sons, Steve and Jeffrey. With the family's Hoopers Island packing plant as a base, the Phillips would create a worldwide empire based upon their relationship with the crab. This is the story of that family. It is also the story of the Empires of the Crab.

The Demonic

Literature and Experience

Author: Ewan Fernie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136178589

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 634

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Are we either good or bad, and do we really know the difference? Why do we want what we cannot have, and even to be what we’re not? Can we desire others without wanting to possess them? Can we open to others and not risk possession ourselves? And where, in these cases, do we draw the line? Ewan Fernie argues that the demonic tradition in literature offers a key to our most agonised and intimate experiences. The Demonic ranges across the breadth of Western culture, engaging with writers as central and various as Luther, Shakespeare, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Melville and Mann. A powerful foreword by Jonathan Dollimore brings out its implications as an intellectual and stylistic breakthrough into new ways of writing criticism. Fernie unfolds an intense and personal vision, not just of Western modernity, but of identity, morality and sex. As much as it’s concerned with the great works, this is a book about life.