Prophet

The Story of Nat Turner

Author: Kenya Cagle

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781492206774

Category: Drama

Page: 186

View: 1997

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Nat Turner, born into slavery October 2, 1800, on a Southampton County plantation, became a preacher who stated in his confession he'd been chosen by God to lead slaves from bondage. On August 21, 1831, he led a freedom movement that resulted in the participation of nearly 100 slaves and free blacks throughout the state. This crusade concluded with the ultimate punishment of nearly 60 slave owners, their wives and children. He eluded capture for nearly six weeks was eventually imprisoned and later hanged. The incident frightened the slave owners so much that in a desperate attempt to hold on to their unjust power they enacted harsher laws against slaves and free black that exhilarated the emancipation movement. Born October 2, 1800 in Southampton County, Virginia. Nat is born on the Virginia plantation of Benjamin Turner. At the age of 3 Nat is witnessed by his parents prophesying about past events. Completely amazed they realize that their son was born for a higher purpose. In addition to being a young prophet Benjamin Turner and the entire neighborhood is astonished and shocked to learn of Nat's mysterious reading and writing comprehension at age 5. At age 10, Nat's father escapes slavery vowing to return for his wife and child. By age 12 Nat encounters a gang of 4 white youth who pummels him helplessly with snowballs. A few weeks later Nat runs into that same gang. This time he revenges the defeat by pelting his attackers with rocks. As a teenager Nat leaves the plantation without permission. An overseer immediately whips him upon his return. Nat sets a trap for the overseer, which results in a horse accident. The overseer legs are crushed. He is unable to return to work. Nat becomes fed up with being enslaved. He runs away. After being free for 30 days, Nat receives a vision from God telling him to return to his earthly master. Nat also see images of the future civil war to come. Nat is assured by the Holy Spirit that his special purpose would help to bring about change. Still thinking about himself Nat argues with the spirit. The spirit chastises Nat. Nat decides to return.After Nat returns some slave dislikes him. Others think he is nuts for returning. On his return, a young beautiful slave girl named Cherry questions Nat. God rewards Nat for his loyalty and he marries Cherry. Cherry is a strong black woman who loves Nat and stands behind everything he does. It is Cherry who Nat shares his innermost thoughts and visions with. They have one child, Charlotte whom Nat loves very much. He does his best to be a good father. Because he returned on his own, Nat is allowed to travel as much as he wants without a pass. In addition he is allowed to preach at different plantations. He is a fiery preacher and leader in his Southampton County neighborhood. His reputation expands and Nat is one of the most sought after black preachers in the south. Nat's slave owners trust him very much. Nat's first signal is an eclipse of the Sun in 1831. It is revealed to Nat that he would lead an emancipation movement among his people. It is at this time that he realizes he must rise up and stand for his people. The emancipation movement begins officially on August 21, 1831, when he and six other former slaves, now freedom fighters punish the Travis family killing all five inhabitants, managing to secure arms and horses. This is when it all hits the fan. Nat and the freedom fighters travel from plantation to plantation punishing the wicked slave owners and their families with death through various means. They encounter many obstacles. They meet many interesting characters both slaves and non-slaves. In the end 55 slave owners and their families are eliminated. Over 200 innocent black are killed by barbaric revengeful mobs. It takes the United States Calvary, hundreds of militia and a force of nearly three thousand soldiers to stop this small group of determined revolutionaries.

Nat Turner

A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory

Author: Kenneth S. Greenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195177565

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 7410

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Nat Turner's name rings through American history with a force all its own. Leader of the most important slave rebellion on these shores, variously viewed as a murderer of unarmed women and children, an inspired religious leader, a fanatic—this puzzling figure represents all the terrible complexities of American slavery. And yet we do not know what he looked like, where he is buried, or even whether Nat Turner was his real name. In Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory, Kenneth S. Greenberg gathers twelve distinguished scholars to offer provocative new insight into the man, his rebellion, and his time, and his place in history. The historians here explore Turner's slave community, discussing the support for his uprising as well as the religious and literary context of his movement. They examine the place of women in his insurrection, and its far-reaching consequences (including an extraordinary 1832 Virginia debate about ridding the state of slavery). Here are discussions of Turner's religious visions—the instructions he received from God to kill all of his white oppressors. Louis Masur places him against the backdrop of the nation's sectional crisis, and Douglas Egerton puts his revolt in the context of rebellions across the Americas. We trace Turner's passage through American memory through fascinating interviews with William Styron on his landmark novel, The Confessions of Nat Turner, and with Dr. Alvin Poussaint, one of the "ten black writers" of the 1960s who bitterly attacked Styron's vision of Turner. Finally, we follow Nat Turner into the world of Hollywood. Nat Turner has always been controversial, an emblem of the searing wound of slavery in American life. This book offers a clear-eyed look at one of the best known and least understood figures in our history.

Myths, Legends, and Folktales of America

An Anthology

Author: David Leeming,Jake Page

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199728954

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 4811

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This marvelous collection brings together the great myths and legends of the United States--from the creation stories of the first inhabitants, to the tall tales of the Western frontier, to the legendary outlaws of the 1920s, and beyond. This thoroughly engaging anthology is sweeping in its scope, embracing Big Foot and Windigo, Hiawatha and Uncle Sam, Paul Revere and Billy the Kid, and even the Iroquois Flying Head and Elvis. In the book's section on dogmas and icons, for instance, Leeming and Page discuss the American melting pot, the notion of manifest destiny, and the imposing historical and literary figure of Henry Adams. And under Heroes and Heroines, they have assembled everyone from "Honest Abe" Lincoln and George "I Cannot Tell a Lie" Washington to Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, and Martin Luther King, Jr. For every myth or hero rendered here, the editors include an informative yet readable excerpt, often the definitive account of the story in question. Taken as a whole, Myths, Legends, and Folktales of America reveals how waves of immigrants, encountering this strange land for the first time, adapted their religions, beliefs, and folklore to help make sense of a new and astounding place. Covering Johnny Appleseed and Stagolee as well as Paul Bunyan and Moby Dick, this wonderful anthology illuminates our nation's myth-making, enriching our idea of what it means to be American.

A Theological Account of Nat Turner

Christianity, Violence, and Theology

Author: K. Lampley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137322969

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 1234

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In this unique volume, Lampley analyzes the theology of Nat Turner's violent slave rebellion in juxtaposition with Old Testament views of prophetic violence and Jesus' politics of violence in the New Testament and in consideration of the history of Christian violence and the violence embedded in traditional Christian theology.

African Americans, Grades 5-8

Author: Robert W. Smith

Publisher: Teacher Created Resources

ISBN: 1420633953

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 96

View: 4602

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Encourage students to take an in-depth view of the people and events of specific eras of American history. Nonfiction reading comprehension is emphasized along with research, writing, critical thinking, working with maps, and more. Most titles include a Readers Theater.

Joining Places

Slave Neighborhoods in the Old South

Author: Anthony E. Kaye

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807877609

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 2632

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In this new interpretation of antebellum slavery, Anthony Kaye offers a vivid portrait of slaves transforming adjoining plantations into slave neighborhoods. He describes men and women opening paths from their owners' plantations to adjacent farms to go courting and take spouses, to work, to run away, and to otherwise contend with owners and their agents. In the course of cultivating family ties, forging alliances, working, socializing, and storytelling, slaves fashioned their neighborhoods into the locus of slave society. Joining Places is the first book about slavery to use the pension files of former soldiers in the Union army, a vast source of rich testimony by ex-slaves. From these detailed accounts, Kaye tells the stories of men and women in love, "sweethearting," "taking up," "living together," and marrying across plantation lines; striving to get right with God; carving out neighborhoods as a terrain of struggle; and working to overthrow the slaveholders' regime. Kaye's depiction of slaves' sense of place in the Natchez District of Mississippi reveals a slave society that comprised not a single, monolithic community but an archipelago of many neighborhoods. Demonstrating that such neighborhoods prevailed across the South, he reformulates ideas about slave marriage, resistance, independent production, paternalism, autonomy, and the slave community that have defined decades of scholarship.

The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Va., as Fully and Voluntarily Made to Thomas R. Gray, in the Prison where He was Confined, and Acknowledged by Him to be Such, when Read Before the Court of Southampton

With the Certificate, Under Seal of the Court Convened at Jerusalem, Nov. 5, 1831, for His Trial

Author: Nat Turner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Southampton Insurrection, 1831

Page: 24

View: 4374

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This Far by Faith

Readings in African-American Women's Religious Biography

Author: Judith Weisenfeld,Richard Newman

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415913126

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 326

View: 6373

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This is a collection of biographies of many women, including gospel singers, black nuns, preachers, missionaries and civil-rights workers. These biographies look at the history and experiences of African American women, in relation to their spirituality and activities in organized religion. Main topics include the bias against women by the male leadership of the Black Church, the racism and sexism of mainstream religions, the relationship between spirituality and activism, and the outside-of-church ways in which women are involved in religion. The book ranges from the period of slavery to the present day, and profiles figures such as Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Willie Mae Ford Smith and Ella Baker, exploring the role that religious institutions, artistic forms and impulses played in their lives.

Nat Turner's Slave Rebellion

Author: Michael Burgan

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 9780736868792

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 1925

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In graphic novel format, this book tells the true story of the 1831 Virginia slave rebellion led by slave Nat Turner, who believed he was a prophet.

Soul Searching

Black-Themed Cinema from the March on Washington to the Rise of Blaxploitation

Author: Christopher Sieving

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819571342

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 280

View: 7533

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The sixties were a tremendously important time of transition for both civil rights activism and the U.S. film industry. Soul Searching examines a subject that, despite its significance to African American film history, has gone largely unexplored until now. By revisiting films produced between the march on Washington in 1963 and the dawn of the “blaxploitation” movie cycle in 1970, Christopher Sieving reveals how race relations influenced black-themed cinema before it was recognized as commercially viable by the major studios. The films that are central to this book—Gone Are the Days (1963), The Cool World (1964), The Confessions of Nat Turner (never produced), Uptight (1968), and The Landlord (1970)—are all ripe for reevaluation and newfound appreciation. Soul Searching is essential reading for anyone interested in the politics and cultural movements of the 1960s, cinematic trends like blaxploitation and the American “indie film” explosion, or black experience and its many facets. Ebook Edition Note: All images have been redacted.